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Comments about the soundtrack for The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (Hans Zimmer/Various)
That review is poor.

Edmund Meinerts
(5ad74cd1.bb.sky.com)
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  Responses to this Comment:
Ds
Beyond El Mar
bam
Jacque
JFC
That review is poor.   Sunday, May 11, 2014 (2:46 a.m.) 

I'm really sorry to side with the trolls and all, but I don't think you gave Zimmer a fair shot in that review. No, the score isn't subtle. Guess what? Neither is a dude who swings around on a web and fights another dude with electricity bolts coming out of his arms!!!

This is the first superhero score I can think of in a long while that has clear, readily identifiable themes for both hero and villain. They might not be orchestrally complex in the way you seem to demand, but they are obvious and identifiable. Is Spidey's theme underutilized? Perhaps, but you don't even mention the cue in which it's given the most forthright statements, "Cold War"! You can't just gloss over the parts of the score that don't back up your arguments!

Putting this score below the complete trash that was Captain America: The Winter Soldier and 300: Rise of an Empire is way, way off the mark. These days you seem to be more harsh on Zimmer himself than the composers who try and ape him, and that's completely the wrong way around. You seem to punish Zimmer for having an identifiable style, but you go easy on the composers who ape him because, hell, the industry demands it, right? If you applied the same standards to, say, Williams as you did to Zimmer ("The Book Thief is simply a rehash of the same melancholic piano drama heard in scores like Angela's Ashes, Presumed Innocent and other Williams drama scores of the 1990s. *"), you'd be a laughingstock.

Look, I get that the site isn't doing well and you need to drum up some traffic. But don't do that by generating cheap controversy.

Man, I haven't felt this way about a Zimmer review of yours since Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End.


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Ds
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  In Response to:
Edmund Meinerts
Re: That review is poor.   Sunday, May 11, 2014 (3:11 a.m.) 

> I'm really sorry to side with the trolls and all, but I don't think you
> gave Zimmer a fair shot in that review. No, the score isn't subtle. Guess
> what? Neither is a dude who swings around on a web and fights another
> dude with electricity bolts coming out of his arms!!!

> This is the first superhero score I can think of in a long while
> that has clear, readily identifiable themes for both hero and villain.
> They might not be orchestrally complex in the way you seem to demand, but
> they are obvious and identifiable. Is Spidey's theme underutilized?
> Perhaps, but you don't even mention the cue in which it's given the most
> forthright statements, "Cold War"! You can't just gloss over the
> parts of the score that don't back up your arguments!

> Putting this score below the complete trash that was Captain America:
> The Winter Soldier
and 300: Rise of an Empire is way, way off
> the mark. These days you seem to be more harsh on Zimmer himself than the
> composers who try and ape him, and that's completely the wrong way around
.
> You seem to punish Zimmer for having an identifiable style, but you go
> easy on the composers who ape him because, hell, the industry demands it,
> right? If you applied the same standards to, say, Williams as you did to
> Zimmer ("The Book Thief is simply a rehash of the same
> melancholic piano drama heard in scores like Angela's Ashes, Presumed
> Innocent
and other Williams drama scores of the 1990s.
> *"), you'd be a laughingstock.

> Look, I get that the site isn't doing well and you need to drum up some
> traffic. But don't do that by generating cheap controversy.

> Man, I haven't felt this way about a Zimmer review of yours since
> Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End.

Edmund, you're 100% right. I hope one day Clemmensen hires you to handle all RCP scores because, even if I do not alway agree with you, you seem to have a more balanced, subtle opinion.

This score may lack subtlety... but not as much as Clemmensen's review does.


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Beyond El Mar
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  In Response to:
Edmund Meinerts
Re: That review is poor.   Sunday, May 11, 2014 (3:25 p.m.) 

> I'm really sorry to side with the trolls and all, but I don't think you
> gave Zimmer a fair shot in that review. No, the score isn't subtle. Guess
> what? Neither is a dude who swings around on a web and fights another
> dude with electricity bolts coming out of his arms!!!

> This is the first superhero score I can think of in a long while
> that has clear, readily identifiable themes for both hero and villain.
> They might not be orchestrally complex in the way you seem to demand, but
> they are obvious and identifiable. Is Spidey's theme underutilized?
> Perhaps, but you don't even mention the cue in which it's given the most
> forthright statements, "Cold War"! You can't just gloss over the
> parts of the score that don't back up your arguments!

> Putting this score below the complete trash that was Captain America:
> The Winter Soldier
and 300: Rise of an Empire is way, way off
> the mark. These days you seem to be more harsh on Zimmer himself than the
> composers who try and ape him, and that's completely the wrong way around.
> You seem to punish Zimmer for having an identifiable style, but you go
> easy on the composers who ape him because, hell, the industry demands it,
> right? If you applied the same standards to, say, Williams as you did to
> Zimmer ("The Book Thief is simply a rehash of the same
> melancholic piano drama heard in scores like Angela's Ashes, Presumed
> Innocent
and other Williams drama scores of the 1990s.
> *"), you'd be a laughingstock.

> Look, I get that the site isn't doing well and you need to drum up some
> traffic. But don't do that by generating cheap controversy.

> Man, I haven't felt this way about a Zimmer review of yours since
> Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End.

It just seems Clemmensen is more harsh when it comes to not re-using existing themes for an already established character, i.e., Garfield's Spiderman.

CC barely gave Tyler a 4th star, but he also was disappointed in Tyler's non-use of Doyle's themes.


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bam
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  In Response to:
Edmund Meinerts
lmao re: hans hate   Sunday, May 11, 2014 (4:08 p.m.) 

the reviews at this site are so lame. blame hans zimmer for everything wrong

> I'm really sorry to side with the trolls and all, but I don't think you
> gave Zimmer a fair shot in that review. No, the score isn't subtle. Guess
> what? Neither is a dude who swings around on a web and fights another
> dude with electricity bolts coming out of his arms!!!

> This is the first superhero score I can think of in a long while
> that has clear, readily identifiable themes for both hero and villain.
> They might not be orchestrally complex in the way you seem to demand, but
> they are obvious and identifiable. Is Spidey's theme underutilized?
> Perhaps, but you don't even mention the cue in which it's given the most
> forthright statements, "Cold War"! You can't just gloss over the
> parts of the score that don't back up your arguments!

> Putting this score below the complete trash that was Captain America:
> The Winter Soldier
and 300: Rise of an Empire is way, way off
> the mark. These days you seem to be more harsh on Zimmer himself than the
> composers who try and ape him, and that's completely the wrong way around.
> You seem to punish Zimmer for having an identifiable style, but you go
> easy on the composers who ape him because, hell, the industry demands it,
> right? If you applied the same standards to, say, Williams as you did to
> Zimmer ("The Book Thief is simply a rehash of the same
> melancholic piano drama heard in scores like Angela's Ashes, Presumed
> Innocent
and other Williams drama scores of the 1990s.
> *"), you'd be a laughingstock.

> Look, I get that the site isn't doing well and you need to drum up some
> traffic. But don't do that by generating cheap controversy.

> Man, I haven't felt this way about a Zimmer review of yours since
> Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End.



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Jacque
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  In Response to:
Edmund Meinerts

  Responses to this Comment:
Yarron Katz
Re: That review is poor.   Sunday, May 11, 2014 (5:54 p.m.) 

Reading the review I was convinced he'd give it two stars. He couldn't even help complimenting the Electro theme. And while the main theme is "hokey" as he said at least there's a level of craftsmanship in it absent from Zimmer's Batman and Superman scores, as well as a love theme, no matter how sparse. I was genuinely surprised to see the * at the end. This is clearly a superior score to MoS and at least the equal of TDK trilogy scores. I'd give it *** for the score and ** in the context of the franchise for abandoning Horner's themes, and a ** overall. Getting mad at the difference between * and ** may seem trite but as you said, there's a clear differential between trash like 300 and a score like this, which if seriously flawed is still functional and at times inspired. This review recalls his ignoring of all the positive qualities of the Pirates scores even if those were flawed too.


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Yarron Katz
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Jacque
Re: That review is poor.   Sunday, July 6, 2014 (5:36 p.m.) 
• Now Playing: The Amazing Spider Man 2... meh.  

> Reading the review I was convinced he'd give it two stars. He couldn't
> even help complimenting the Electro theme. And while the main theme is
> "hokey" as he said at least there's a level of craftsmanship in
> it absent from Zimmer's Batman and Superman scores, as well as a love
> theme, no matter how sparse. I was genuinely surprised to see the * at the
> end. This is clearly a superior score to MoS and at least the equal of TDK
> trilogy scores. I'd give it *** for the score and ** in the context of the
> franchise for abandoning Horner's themes, and a ** overall. Getting mad at
> the difference between * and ** may seem trite but as you said, there's a
> clear differential between trash like 300 and a score like this, which if
> seriously flawed is still functional and at times inspired. This review
> recalls his ignoring of all the positive qualities of the Pirates scores
> even if those were flawed too.

I hear your point, but when you are talking about an already established franchise you have to review it in the context of that franchise. To put it differently: Spiderman will never be considered against films like '300'. It's held to a different standard. A film like '300' can get 2 stars for being functional because it's a one off and stands alone. Spiderman on the other hand does not stand alone. It stands with every Spiderman film preceding it which has already created a baseline for expected quality. Therefore the composer needs to step up to bat with a baseline to achieve since he's going to make "Spiderman" as an icon better or worse. In other words his soundtrack is going to either bring up or drag down the entire franchise. It's not a one film thing. It is an extra challenge that comes with the job, but at the same time he had an outstanding foundation to work with. A composer is entitled to abandon that foundation, but in doing so he is making the claim that he had reason enough to abandon it because he can make it better. As a result you have more to gain but also more to lose. In this case by Zimmer abandoning an outstanding basis and replacing it with something barely functional one is fully entitled to penalize him. Particularly when it was done so brazenly. A composer needs to be held accountable for the reasoning behind choices that made the soundtrack what it is. His choice to re-invent the wheel with a worse wheel, just to show everyone he can make it newer must be considered. And in doing so he didn't just damage the movie, he damaged "Spiderman".


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JFC
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  In Response to:
Edmund Meinerts

  Responses to this Comment:
Edmund Meinerts
NM
Ethan R. Smith
Craig Richard Lysy
Jens
Re: That review is poor.   Monday, May 12, 2014 (7:10 a.m.) 

> I'm really sorry to side with the trolls and all, but I don't think you
> gave Zimmer a fair shot in that review. No, the score isn't subtle. Guess
> what? Neither is a dude who swings around on a web and fights another
> dude with electricity bolts coming out of his arms!!!

> This is the first superhero score I can think of in a long while
> that has clear, readily identifiable themes for both hero and villain.
> They might not be orchestrally complex in the way you seem to demand, but
> they are obvious and identifiable. Is Spidey's theme underutilized?
> Perhaps, but you don't even mention the cue in which it's given the most
> forthright statements, "Cold War"! You can't just gloss over the
> parts of the score that don't back up your arguments!

> Putting this score below the complete trash that was Captain America:
> The Winter Soldier
and 300: Rise of an Empire is way, way off
> the mark. These days you seem to be more harsh on Zimmer himself than the
> composers who try and ape him, and that's completely the wrong way around.
> You seem to punish Zimmer for having an identifiable style, but you go
> easy on the composers who ape him because, hell, the industry demands it,
> right? If you applied the same standards to, say, Williams as you did to
> Zimmer ("The Book Thief is simply a rehash of the same
> melancholic piano drama heard in scores like Angela's Ashes, Presumed
> Innocent
and other Williams drama scores of the 1990s.
> *"), you'd be a laughingstock.

> Look, I get that the site isn't doing well and you need to drum up some
> traffic. But don't do that by generating cheap controversy.

> Man, I haven't felt this way about a Zimmer review of yours since
> Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End.

Though I cannot speak for the reviewer I can speak for myself and say that I think that the reason for the Zimmer hate is the fact that the man's "identifiable style" seems to have shattered the industry completely. The film scoring industry, in my opinion, has lost much of it's finesse and yeah, complexity. Does a score have to be orchestrally complex? Yes. Especially if you have six plus other people working with you. As a four year composition student I can write more orchestrally complex, two hour pieces of crap than a dozen of the Zimmer clones. I think that anyone can just fart out a theme, slap it on the french horns and trombones, scratch out some repeating figures in the low strings and call it good. The only Zimmer clone that I have any respect for is John Powell and he doesn't even write for film anymore. The man seems to be fed up with Hollywood and the way the industry is. But why is it this way? Zimmer. And so Powell turns to concert composing, a far less commercially stable business but a far more rewarding one as there are no directors screaming down your ear "I WANTED FREAKING ZIMMER. WHY AREN'T YOU HANS ZIMMER? MAKE MY MOVIE SOUND LIKE BATMAN! SOUND LIKE ZIMMER! BWAAAAAAAAM! BWAAAAAAAM! James Horner isn't scoring anymore. What's with that? He doesn't like scoring for Hollywood. Why? I don't know, Horner is weird like that but I bet it has something to do with ZIMMER. Every time I hear his name is assigned to a film I get physically Ill. Every time I actually hear the score, same thing. I hate Zimmer because he killed the sound that has so often brought me so much joy. He killed the industry that I was so looking forward to working in but now I want nothing to do with. I hate Zimmer because now, to the general public, he is all that film scoring is. That fake orchestral sound that is, by the way, killing the orchestra. That simplistic rock influenced bull crap that a first year piano student could play perfectly simply sight reading. No more Williams, no more Horner, no more Powell. No, no, no, It's all just ZIMMER. Zimmer this, Zimmer, that, I am tired of Zimmer. I know I'm just fueling the fire but I am tired of the debates. I'm tired of the Zimmer fan boys who don't seem to know the first thing about music. I'm tired of Clemmenson posting Zimmer reviews before he reviews the good scores (Like Rio 2. Where is my Rio 2?) I am tired of film scores. The only film scores that come out nowadays are ZIMMER clones anyway so what's the point? Good orchestral music IS DEAD. A conerstone of music that has stood for 500 years is dead. Symphony orchestras are going bankrupt, popular music is getting more and more simplistic and idiotic. And guess what? I never thought I would say this; SO ARE THE FILM SCORES! Yes this review is poor, but so is the music.



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Edmund Meinerts
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JFC

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Ty Scott
Flo
Adrian
Whoa, pony. Easy on the melodrama.   Monday, May 12, 2014 (9:00 a.m.) 

> Does a score have to be orchestrally complex? Yes.

Why? Who said? That's an awfully narrow-minded way to look at things, isn't it? So you don't think there's any place in any film score for jazz, rock or electronica? You don't think there's any artistry in the effective combination of those genres? You think a movie like Tron Legacy, where electronics and technology are integral to the plot, would have been better served with a purely orchestral score?

> Every time I hear his name is assigned to a film I get physically Ill.

If it really affects you that much, seek help.

> I hate Zimmer because he killed the
> sound that has so often brought me so much joy.

"Killed"? Really? So primarily orchestral artists like Alexandre Desplat, Michael Giacchino, Danny Elfman, Marco Beltrami and Howard Shore, whose careers are going stronger than ever, they all sound like Zimmer too? Or up-and-comers like Andrew Lockington? We're getting three new Star Wars scores from John Williams in the next few years...I suppose those will sound like Zimmer as well?

> I'm tired of Clemmenson posting
> Zimmer reviews before he reviews the good scores (Like Rio 2. Where is my
> Rio 2?)

I thought The Amazing Spider-Man 2 was fresher-sounding and had more to offer than Rio 2. And believe me, you'll find no greater supporter of John Powell at Filmtracks than me. But just because something is well-orchestrated and has so and so many simultaneous lines of action, doesn't necessarily mean it's a better or more effective film score.

> I am tired of film scores. The only film scores that come out
> nowadays are ZIMMER clones anyway so what's the point? Good orchestral
> music IS DEAD. A conerstone of music that has stood for 500 years is dead.
> Symphony orchestras are going bankrupt, popular music is getting more and
> more simplistic and idiotic. And guess what? I never thought I would say
> this; SO ARE THE FILM SCORES! Yes this review is poor, but so is the
> music.

Jesus Christ, the overkill in this paragraph is laughable. Yes, Zimmer has undoubtedly had an effect on the industry and it's been for the worse on many occasions, but painting it in black and white the way you do makes you look like a ranting lunatic. And stop saying "killed". You make it sound like Hans Zimmer is sneaking into violinists' houses and murdering them in their sleep.


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Ty Scott
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  In Response to:
Edmund Meinerts
Re: Whoa, pony. Easy on the melodrama.   Monday, May 12, 2014 (9:27 a.m.) 

> "Killed"? Really? So primarily orchestral artists like Alexandre
> Desplat, Michael Giacchino, Danny Elfman, Marco Beltrami and Howard Shore,
> whose careers are going stronger than ever, they all sound like Zimmer
> too? Or up-and-comers like Andrew Lockington? We're getting three new
> Star Wars scores from John Williams in the next few years...I
> suppose those will sound like Zimmer as well?

I've really been happy with Beltrami lately. To me he had the best year of 2013. And to add to that, I think Roque Banos is a good up and comer too. Really loved his work on the Evil Dead and Oldboy remakes. Yeah, this is far from killed. More like flourished.

> And stop saying "killed". You make it sound like Hans Zimmer is sneaking into
> violinists' houses and murdering them in their sleep.

He probably attaches headphones to their ears and plays "BWAAAAAMMMM!!!" til their brains pop. XD



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Flo
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  In Response to:
Edmund Meinerts
Re: Whoa, pony. Easy on the melodrama.   Monday, May 12, 2014 (11:32 a.m.) 

> And stop saying "killed". You
> make it sound like Hans Zimmer is sneaking into violinists' houses and
> murdering them in their sleep.

maybe he will, once Bruckheimer is done with the woodwind section
Joke aside, I agree 100% with your first comment. The music was far better than this review made it turn out and there isn't really much in the way of a review on the score, it reads more like what Adorno had to write about Sibelius back in his days. Minus the long sentence constructs that Adorno made.



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Adrian
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  In Response to:
Edmund Meinerts

  Responses to this Comment:
Ethan R. Smith
Re: Whoa, pony. Easy on the melodrama.   Monday, May 12, 2014 (9:30 p.m.) 

> Why? Who said? That's an awfully narrow-minded way to look at things,
> isn't it? So you don't think there's any place in any film score for jazz,
> rock or electronica? You don't think there's any artistry in the effective
> combination of those genres? You think a movie like Tron Legacy,
> where electronics and technology are integral to the plot, would have been
> better served with a purely orchestral score?

That's the problem, you said it yourself. This is Spider-Man, not Tron Legacy. If you want to hear a good use of electronics blended with identifiable themes, look no further than Horner's score. He utilizes sound effects to create the atmosphere of a journey, and with horns sounding in the background, it provides a heroic feel. So what you get is a heroic journey, precisely the thesis of a superhero film. I like certain elements that Zimmer incorporated here, particularly the Electro voices, but overall the score didn't help cement the film in my mind in the way past scores have (included those scored by Zimmer). It's hard to give credit to a piece of work as a whole that succeeds and fails in certain areas, when the whole purpose of the score is to serve the film and make itself memorable. The film passed without the score leaving a mark on me whatsoever. If I had to make an effort to listen actively for praise points versus a score catching my attention immediately, it's not too hard to tell if it's good or not.


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Ethan R. Smith
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Adrian
Re: Whoa, pony. Easy on the melodrama.   Monday, May 12, 2014 (11:58 p.m.) 

> That's the problem, you said it yourself. This is Spider-Man, not Tron
> Legacy. If you want to hear a good use of electronics blended with
> identifiable themes, look no further than Horner's score. He utilizes
> sound effects to create the atmosphere of a journey, and with horns
> sounding in the background, it provides a heroic feel. So what you get is
> a heroic journey, precisely the thesis of a superhero film. I like certain
> elements that Zimmer incorporated here, particularly the Electro voices,
> but overall the score didn't help cement the film in my mind in the way
> past scores have (included those scored by Zimmer). It's hard to give
> credit to a piece of work as a whole that succeeds and fails in certain
> areas, when the whole purpose of the score is to serve the film and make
> itself memorable. The film passed without the score leaving a mark on me
> whatsoever. If I had to make an effort to listen actively for praise
> points versus a score catching my attention immediately, it's not too hard
> to tell if it's good or not.

This might have to do with the fact that's criminally under-mixed in the film.


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NM
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  In Response to:
JFC

  Responses to this Comment:
Ethan R. Smith
Re: That review is poor.   Monday, May 12, 2014 (1:20 p.m.) 

> The film scoring industry, in my opinion, has lost much of
> it's finesse and yeah, complexity. Does a score have to be orchestrally
> complex? Yes.

Not necessarily.

> As a four year composition student I can write more orchestrally
> complex, two hour pieces of crap than a dozen of the Zimmer clones.

Probably not to be honest. These people know their stuff about music otherwise they wouldn't be working on films.

> He killed the industry
> that I was so looking forward to working in but now I want nothing to do
> with. I hate Zimmer because now, to the general public, he is all that
> film scoring is. That fake orchestral sound that is, by the way, killing
> the orchestra. That simplistic rock influenced bull crap that a first year
> piano student could play perfectly simply sight reading.

I understand why you're vexed but you're overreacting. There are still opportunities to write the music you want to write, you have to push hard to make your potential clients see it your way, that your kind of music is what will add value, rather than moaning they just want another sound. It has always been thus.

Listen, as a fellow amateur/semipro composer, I know the frustration of seeing endless reams of crap being produced by people who download some sample libraries and now think they can compose. I know the frustration of finding it difficult to get projects to work on because people are only after the popular sound. But it doesn't stop me writing what I want to write, even if concessions have to be made.

It's probably frustrating feeling like your four years studying music doesn't count for as much, and that the value of your skill-set has been diminished, but that's just how it is, and you got to deal with it.



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Ethan R. Smith
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NM
Re: That review is poor.   Monday, May 26, 2014 (6:33 p.m.) 

> It's probably frustrating feeling like your four years studying music
> doesn't count for as much, and that the value of your skill-set has been
> diminished, but that's just how it is, and you got to deal with it.

This, unfortunately, hit the nail on the head.
As a non-music student, I feel like my compositions are completely as viable (and even more in demand) than almost all of the music students I know.


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Ethan R. Smith
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JFC

  Responses to this Comment:
Pawel Stroinski
Re: That review is poor.   Tuesday, May 13, 2014 (12:05 a.m.) 

> Does a score have to be orchestrally
> complex? Yes. Especially if you have six plus other people working with
> you. As a four year composition student I can write more orchestrally
> complex, two hour pieces of crap than a dozen of the Zimmer clones. I
> think that anyone can just fart out a theme, slap it on the french horns
> and trombones, scratch out some repeating figures in the low strings and
> call it good.

Oh great, if you're so talented, why doesn't Hollywood hire you to score every film? I'm willing to reckon that Zimmer's Spider-Man theme is more memorable than ANYTHING you've ever written, and most likely more memorable than anything you will ever write.

What is it with you people and synthetic instruments? You come off as a crying baby. "AHHHH IT HAS SOUND EFFECTS AND SYNTH IN IT. IT MUST BE TRASH AND NOT MUSIC BECAUSE A COMPUTER IS PLAYING IT AND NOT AN ORCHESTRA."

Synthetic instrumental effects in a period-piece about world war II, or a movie about feudal Japan. Unfortunately, your argument is completely laughable. This is a movie that takes place in today's world- "it isn't Tron." Well, I don't know if you noticed or not, but THE VILLAIN IS MADE OF [bleep!]ING ELECRICITY. HE FLIES AROUND AND ZAPS PEOPLE. HE INHABITS ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS AND MAKES THEM SCREECH AND BUZZ. If that doesn't merit synth instruments, I don't have a single clue what does.

I feel sorry for people like you. Have fun never getting a job. And that's not only because your "useless" music degree. It's mostly because of your crap attitude about film music in general. You must be SOOOOO smart. If you are such a genius, why do people keep hiring "idiots" like Zimmer and not you?

Please don't come back to these forums ever again. Go hang out at FSM, I'm sure they won't mind.


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Pawel Stroinski
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  In Response to:
Ethan R. Smith
Re: That review is poor.   Tuesday, May 13, 2014 (7:10 a.m.) 

> Oh great, if you're so talented, why doesn't Hollywood hire you to score
> every film? I'm willing to reckon that Zimmer's Spider-Man theme is more
> memorable than ANYTHING you've ever written, and most likely more
> memorable than anything you will ever write.

> What is it with you people and synthetic instruments? You come off as a
> crying baby. "AHHHH IT HAS SOUND EFFECTS AND SYNTH IN IT. IT MUST BE
> TRASH AND NOT MUSIC BECAUSE A COMPUTER IS PLAYING IT AND NOT AN
> ORCHESTRA."

> Synthetic instrumental effects in a period-piece about world war II, or a
> movie about feudal Japan. Unfortunately, your argument is completely
> laughable. This is a movie that takes place in today's world- "it
> isn't Tron." Well, I don't know if you noticed or not, but THE
> VILLAIN IS MADE OF [bleep!]ING ELECRICITY. HE FLIES AROUND AND ZAPS
> PEOPLE. HE INHABITS ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS AND MAKES THEM SCREECH AND BUZZ.
> If that doesn't merit synth instruments, I don't have a single clue what
> does.

> I feel sorry for people like you. Have fun never getting a job. And that's
> not only because your "useless" music degree. It's mostly
> because of your crap attitude about film music in general. You must be
> SOOOOO smart. If you are such a genius, why do people keep hiring
> "idiots" like Zimmer and not you?

> Please don't come back to these forums ever again. Go hang out at FSM, I'm
> sure they won't mind.

If the guy is serious about having a career in film scoring and industry people actually read the comment sections on this site, he just effectively committed a professional suicide.



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Craig Richard Lysy
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  In Response to:
JFC
Film Score Art is Alive and Well.   Tuesday, May 13, 2014 (1:24 a.m.) 

My friend, take a breath. I get that you are disappointed, but film score art is alive and well. Zimmer himself recently commented at a forum that he understands that 'people feel he is destroying film score art.' His admission and declaration that he was abandoning his RC scoring methodology suggests that he understands that he needs to turn the page and begin a new opus. TASM2 for me is a clear departure and confirms to me that Zimmer is again innovating and charting a new course. I remain open.

European, art house and independent films continue to offer a rich array of thematic orchestral scores. The few big blockbuster films however seem to grab all the headlines. When quarter 2 closes, check out my list and you will see my point! Now, onward to Godzilla, which I believe will make both you and me very happy!

All the best!



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Jens
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t)

  In Response to:
JFC
Re: That review is poor.   Friday, May 16, 2014 (8:19 p.m.) 
• Now Playing: Solar Crisis - Maurice Jarre  

> [Ö] Good orchestral
> music IS DEAD. A conerstone of music that has stood for 500 years is dead.
> Symphony orchestras are going bankrupt, popular music is getting more and
> more simplistic and idiotic. And guess what? I never thought I would say
> this; SO ARE THE FILM SCORES! Yes this review is poor, but so is the
> music.

Itís true that complex orchestral scores are more on the fringes now. Donít look for one in a blockbuster, unless someone like Desplat or Giacchino is at the helm. Hollywood is stagnant, but old-fashioned film music is still de rigueur in Japan and Europe, and video games love to evoke the classic movie style.

Thereís so much great new music out there if you care to look. Also, the collectorís market is insanely active, and wonderful old scores are being released every week. I for one am looking forward to The Peacemaker Complete.



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