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Comments about the soundtrack for A Beautiful Mind (James Horner)
Horner IS a really THIEF!!!

Paul
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  Responses to this Comment:
Nick Wilder
copernicus
Ommadawn
Horner IS a really THIEF!!!   Thursday, August 21, 2003 (11:04 a.m.) 

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Nick Wilder
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  In Response to:
Paul
Re: Horner IS a really THIEF!!!   Sunday, November 16, 2003 (3:37 p.m.) 

> SEE PREVIOUS COMMENT!

"Horner IS a really THIEF!!!" Excellent grammar. Anyway, I liked the score. I thought that Church's voice added a unique sound to the music (even though it may have been a self rip-off. Okay, it was). But it is HIS music to rip off isn't it? Leave the guy alone! As long as the music fits the movie, that's the main thing. Even if the score itself sucks (which this one doesn't).

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copernicus
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  In Response to:
Paul
Re: Horner IS a really THIEF!!!   Sunday, December 14, 2003 (6:40 p.m.) 

I personally feel that Horner has perfectly captured the despairity of a crazy man's mind. You can feel the hopelessness and the loneliness in this music. Horner writes his music in colors; it isn't hard to notice. A very rare find in movie music.

Also, a comment on Horner's so-called "borrowing techniques": Danny Elfman clearly stole his famous Batman theme from the first movement of Paul Hindemith's Mathis der Maler, but you don't hear anyone compaining about that. Check it out sometime.

copernicus

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Ommadawn
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  In Response to:
Paul
Re: Horner IS a really THIEF!!!   Saturday, January 3, 2004 (5:44 a.m.) 

>Horner IS a really THIEF!!

So is Williams, and so is Goldsmith at times. But we dont have to use such a harsh word. All film composers have written works heavily influenced by Classical pieces. Listen to "Making the plane" from William's "Home Alone", and you may aswell be listening to the Nutracker Suite. They've also used their own material in later films. Yet,Home Alone is one of my favourite Williams scores. Why you ask?. Well,because it works extremely well. The idea is to write music that works well for a movie and helps it. Not to make sure that you please ranting and raving score fans out there,by never repeating yourself or re-using a formula. They've got more important work to do,than making sure they dont offend you by using their own material now and again,or writing scores heavily influenced by existing works. This must be realized. The fact that material and certain formulas are used several times is nothing to do with deliberately going out to "decieve" audiences or anything. If it works, then they will use it several times. I often hear this accusation against Horner when they hear his older scores like "Brainstorm". They rant that he's just using his old material. He was'nt then. He was creating new material. Horner does often re-use forumlas, but why people get so angry about it is beyond my understanding. Just chill out a bit.


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