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Comments about the soundtrack for A Beautiful Mind (James Horner)
Horners Endless repetations

Klen
(spider-fra-ta014.proxy.aol.com)


  Responses to this Comment:
Sean Raduechel
Horners Endless repetations   Sunday, March 24, 2002 (3:10 a.m.) 

I havent listened to ABM yet , but i think heres the right place to critisize the problem i have with horner.
i got many soundtracks composed by horner , from StarTrek II over Willow to Enemy at the Gates.
Yesterday I listened to many of them , and its unbelievable : in the 1989 Willow Score its one Theme which is identically used in Enemy at the Gates.Then I listen to enemy at the gates.Here he uses a theme which sounds a bit similar to Schindlers List.but its also a theme he uses in Apollo13.
And this way it goes on , he composes one main theme , and the rest he fills with variations of older themes or underthemes he once composed.
If you really want to enjoy a horner soundtrack you cant listen to some of them in a short period of time.Otherwise youŽll really be bothered of this endless repeations.
dont get me wrong,im a big horner fan , and i think heŽs one of the greatest movie composers ever , but i hope ill hear a soundtrack of him where he doesnt uses any of his older themes.

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Sean Raduechel
<Send E-Mail>
(csradu469.uwsp.edu)

  In Response to:
Klen

  Responses to this Comment:
.
Re: Horners Endless repetations   Sunday, April 7, 2002 (9:56 a.m.) 

> I havent listened to ABM yet , but i think heres the right place to
> critisize the problem i have with horner.
i got many soundtracks
> composed by horner , from StarTrek II over Willow to Enemy at the Gates.
>
Yesterday I listened to many of them , and its unbelievable : in the
> 1989 Willow Score its one Theme which is identically used in Enemy at the
> Gates.Then I listen to enemy at the gates.Here he uses a theme which
> sounds a bit similar to Schindlers List.but its also a theme he uses in
> Apollo13.
And this way it goes on , he composes one main theme , and
> the rest he fills with variations of older themes or underthemes he once
> composed.
If you really want to enjoy a horner soundtrack you cant
> listen to some of them in a short period of time.Otherwise youŽll really
> be bothered of this endless repeations.
dont get me wrong,im a big
> horner fan , and i think heŽs one of the greatest movie composers ever ,
> but i hope ill hear a soundtrack of him where he doesnt uses any of his
> older themes.

I have several other scores by Horner, and although I would never really claim myself to be a fan of any particular composer, I too enjoy Horner's work. Although I have only heard Willow's main theme, I can tell you this, there are really only a few others that Horners repitition occurs in that they are not really just extensions of his style and tend to kill the scores significance. The two that I know of are Bicentenial Man and, believe it or not, Titanic. Bicentenial Man is almost a duplication of Braveheart, Deep Impact, and Land Before Time, two of which I can claim to be original since all accusations on them are just extensions of Horner's style (like his preference to use large choral arrangments). Titanic, having just realized this recently, is actually heavily, too heavily I might add, modelled after The Rocketeer. In conclusion, you put up a good point, but as my friends and I like to say, there are only a limited number of notes that can be used in a limited number of ways. Besides, if you really look closely, you'll see that Horner is not the only one to do that.

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.
(p1.proxy.tpo.fi)

  In Response to:
Sean Raduechel

  Responses to this Comment:
Sean Raduechel
Re: Horners Endless repetations   Tuesday, June 18, 2002 (4:52 p.m.) 

> I have several other scores by Horner, and although I would never really
> claim myself to be a fan of any particular composer, I too enjoy Horner's
> work. Although I have only heard Willow's main theme, I can tell you this,
> there are really only a few others that Horners repitition occurs in that
> they are not really just extensions of his style and tend to kill the
> scores significance. The two that I know of are Bicentenial Man and,
> believe it or not, Titanic. Bicentenial Man is almost a duplication of
> Braveheart, Deep Impact, and Land Before Time, two of which I can claim to
> be original since all accusations on them are just extensions of Horner's
> style (like his preference to use large choral arrangments). Titanic,
> having just realized this recently, is actually heavily, too heavily I
> might add, modelled after The Rocketeer. In conclusion, you put up a good
> point, but as my friends and I like to say, there are only a limited
> number of notes that can be used in a limited number of ways. Besides, if
> you really look closely, you'll see that Horner is not the only one to do
> that.

You have to remember, that he does music for the background. He doesn't do the music for us to listen to, but for us to enjoy a movie with, if you watch any movie with Horner's composion, the music fits perfectly to the picture. That's why soundtracks can never be as good as music done for only listening. Theme and variation is for the best of the film, not necessarily best music to listen to.

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Sean Raduechel
<Send E-Mail>
(wcfls-238.wcfls.lib.wi.us)

  In Response to:
.
The listenablility of film scores   Thursday, June 20, 2002 (5:32 p.m.) 

> You have to remember, that he does music for the background. He doesn't do
> the music for us to listen to, but for us to enjoy a movie with, if you
> watch any movie with Horner's composion, the music fits perfectly to the
> picture. That's why soundtracks can never be as good as music done for
> only listening. Theme and variation is for the best of the film, not
> necessarily best music to listen to.

Yes it is true that film music should be judged primarily based on how it works with the film, but in no way does that mean that film music is undesirable to listen to of that it could never compare to music composed solely for listening.
Listenability of music is based mostly off of personal taste, for instance my personal tastes are more in preference towards soundtracks because of the clear emotions they evoke. So clearly one cannot state that film scores are unlistenble. Also, when comparing filmtracks to other music styles, to say that Thomas Newmann can never be as good as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is folly because Newmann does not compose classical music. Most soundtracks are of a completely different genre of music. Those that sound relatively similar to other genres, namely classical, tend to share most of their similarities with particular genres within those genres, like Americana. Even then, the focus of the composer, say Elmer Bernstein, is not to write a great americana piece, but to fullfill the purpose of the film. To be frank, what I am basically getting at here is that we should not say that film music can never compare in quality and listenability to the grand works of the stage and concert hall, because they are created for a completely different role, and whether or not we enjoy listening to them apart from their films, they are still great works by brilliant minds.

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