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Academic Overture

Cortoisis
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  Responses to this Comment:
S.Venkatnarayanan
Academic Overture   Friday, August 8, 2008 (12:58 p.m.) 

I was pleasantly surprised while listening to the track "Whirl Through Academe" to hear a segment of Johannes Brahms' "Academic Overture." This can be heard between 2:39 and 2:49 of the track.

Just thought that was clever and wanted to know if other such references were included in any of the other cues.


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S.Venkatnarayanan
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  In Response to:
Cortoisis

  Responses to this Comment:
Tom Garber
John Williams copied Brahms music?   Friday, October 10, 2008 (4:18 a.m.) 

> I was pleasantly surprised while listening to the track "Whirl
> Through Academe" to hear a segment of Johannes Brahms' "Academic
> Overture." This can be heard between 2:39 and 2:49 of the track.

> Just thought that was clever and wanted to know if other such references
> were included in any of the other cues.

That's quite unbelievable that john has involved in Plagiarism. Do you agree with this?


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Tom Garber
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  In Response to:
S.Venkatnarayanan

  Responses to this Comment:
S.Venkatnarayanan
Re: John Williams copied Brahms music?   Wednesday, October 29, 2008 (5:36 a.m.) 

Dear Mr. Venkatnarayanan,
The quotation by John Williams from Brahms's Academic Festival Overture is quite appropriate. Brahms wrote his piece as a thank-you for the an honorary Doctor's Degree in music given to him by the University of Breslau.
In his piece, he quoted from several well-known tunes that were sung by college students in those days. So John Williams is paying homage to the proud history of collegiate life by quoting Brahms here.
In a similar humorous vein, in Saint Saens's Carnival of the Animals, in the movement called 'Fossils', he quotes from children's songs that were considered to be out-of-date, and therefore 'fossils'.

- Tom Garber



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S.Venkatnarayanan
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  In Response to:
Tom Garber

  Responses to this Comment:
Tom Garber
Re: John Williams copied Brahms music?   Sunday, November 2, 2008 (10:54 p.m.) 

> Dear Mr. Venkatnarayanan,
> The quotation by John Williams from Brahms's Academic Festival Overture is
> quite appropriate. Brahms wrote his piece as a thank-you for the an
> honorary Doctor's Degree in music given to him by the University of
> Breslau.
> In his piece, he quoted from several well-known tunes that were sung by
> college students in those days. So John Williams is paying homage to the
> proud history of collegiate life by quoting Brahms here.
> In a similar humorous vein, in Saint Saens's Carnival of the Animals, in
> the movement called 'Fossils', he quotes from children's songs that were
> considered to be out-of-date, and therefore 'fossils'.

> - Tom Garber

You mean to say that it wasn't deliberate or intentional by Williams to lift that particular notes from Brahms' Academic Festival overture. Is it not?


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Tom Garber
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  In Response to:
S.Venkatnarayanan

  Responses to this Comment:
S.Venkatnarayanan
Re: John Williams copied Brahms music?   Monday, November 3, 2008 (4:49 a.m.) 

Dear Mr. Venkatnarayanan,
Yes - you're absolutely correct, John Williams deliberately used the same notes that Brahms wrote in his Academic Festival Overture. Forgive me if I didn't explain clearly what I was trying to say.
I think what's important here is the spirit in which this quotation should be taken. Usually when we think of plagarism, we think of something dishonest or disreputable. I think what John William did here is commendable instead. He wanted to have fun by paying homage to the same jovial sense of humor Brahms had in borrowing this College song in the first place. Brahms didn't write this tune - it's a folk song that was known in Germany for generations.
Another example of this kind of thing can be found in the last movement of Haydn's Symphony No. 104. His so-called 'London' Symphony. Haydn was adored by the British, and in this piece, he quotes a tune that pays homage to London itself.



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S.Venkatnarayanan
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  In Response to:
Tom Garber
Re: John Williams copied Brahms music?   Thursday, November 6, 2008 (3:31 a.m.) 

> Dear Mr. Venkatnarayanan,
> Yes - you're absolutely correct, John Williams deliberately used the same
> notes that Brahms wrote in his Academic Festival Overture. Forgive me if I
> didn't explain clearly what I was trying to say.
> I think what's important here is the spirit in which this quotation should
> be taken. Usually when we think of plagarism, we think of something
> dishonest or disreputable. I think what John William did here is
> commendable instead. He wanted to have fun by paying homage to the same
> jovial sense of humor Brahms had in borrowing this College song in the
> first place. Brahms didn't write this tune - it's a folk song that was
> known in Germany for generations.
> Another example of this kind of thing can be found in the last movement of
> Haydn's Symphony No. 104. His so-called 'London' Symphony. Haydn was
> adored by the British, and in this piece, he quotes a tune that pays
> homage to London itself.

Mr.Tom Garber,

Thank you very much for your explanation. I am a huge fan of John Williams. When i first heard that particular track i was shocked and i thought how Maestro could involve in plagiarism? But now i am cleared. Thank you very much once again.

Have a nice day!


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