SUPPORT FILMTRACKS! CLICK HERE FIRST:
Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk
iTunes (U.S.)
Amazon.ca
Amazon.fr
eBay (U.S.)
Amazon.de
Amazon.es
Half.com
Glisten Effect
Editorial Reviews
Scoreboard Forum
Viewer Ratings
Composers
Awards
   NEWEST MAJOR REVIEWS:
     1. Ant-Man and the Wasp
    2. Jurassic World: Kingdom
   3. Incredibles 2
  4. Solo: A Star Wars Story
 5. Deadpool 2
6. Avengers: Infinity War
   CURRENT MOST POPULAR REVIEWS:
         1. Star Wars: The Last Jedi
        2. Gladiator
       3. Blade Runner 2049
      4. Batman
     5. Thor: Ragnarok
    6. The Avengers
   7. Spider-Man: Homecoming
  8. Avatar
 9. Dunkirk
10. Phantom Thread
Home Page
Menu Options ▼

Edit | Delete
Re: Williams was scratched over by Williams
Profile Image
• Posted by: Will
• Date: Friday, January 7, 2011, at 6:02 a.m.
• IP Address: allen-7.stetson.edu
• In Response to: Re: Williams was scratched over by Williams (DKB)

True to an extent, but many of the new themes have the notes/progressions of Hedwig's theme at their core identities (Window to the Past, Aunt Marge's Waltz). Also the film is given a new central theme of it's own with Double Trouble - a feat Doyle dabbled in with Harry in Winter and Hooper with In Noctem, but something largely ignored in films 5 and 7.

It's easily argued that many of Williams' established themes that could/should have returned at some point in the franchise simply weren't necessary in Azkaban (no Voldemort, no Dobby, no Fawkes). A continuity enthusiast might still wish Voldy's material had been referenced a bit when his name was bandied about, but it's not quite as glaring as losing the material entirely for his on screen rebirth and ascent to power.

So while, Williams did begin to change the palette with Azkaban, the franchises primary identity was still at the core of the new themes, and the 'style' of the score - with a primary identity theme and a few very prominent supporters - was in keeping with the previous films.

With the later composers, I (and many others I assume) have been fine with the additional expansions to the palette - Doyle's more noble/British tones in Goblet, Hooper's haunted choir in Half-Blood, even Desplat's more subdued melodies -- but it's the loss of the thematic continuity that is lamented. Each composers should certainly be allowed to bring their voice into the mix, but to ignore the development that's already been given to these characters/situations is just lazy.




Comments in this Thread:     Expand >>


Copyright © 1998-2018, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast,
rewritten or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. Scoreboard created 7/24/98 and last updated 4/25/15.