SUPPORT FILMTRACKS! CLICK HERE FIRST:
Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk
iTunes (U.S.)
Amazon.ca
Amazon.fr
eBay (U.S.)
Amazon.de
Amazon.es
Half.com
Glisten Effect
Editorial Reviews
Scoreboard Forum
Viewer Ratings
Composers
Awards
   NEWEST MAJOR REVIEWS:
     1. Transformers: Last Knight
    2. Cars 3
   3. The Mummy
  4. Wonder Woman
 5. POTC: Dead Men Tell No Tales
6. Alien: Covenant


   CURRENT BEST-SELLING SCORES:
       1. Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
      2. Fantastic Beasts/Find Them
     3. Willow
    4. The Ghost and the Darkness
   5. An American Tail
  6. The Wind and the Lion
 7. Doctor Strange
8. 10 Cloverfield Lane
   CURRENT MOST POPULAR REVIEWS:
         1. Star Wars: Force Awakens
        2. E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
       3. Titanic
      4. Avatar
     5. Nineteen Eighty-Four
    6. Gladiator
   7. Star Wars: A New Hope
  8. Animal Farm
 9. LOTR: Fellowship of the Ring
10. Harry Potter: Sorcerer's Stone
Home Page
Menu Options ▼
Comments about the soundtrack for The Golden Compass (Alexandre Desplat)

Edit | Delete
Ending
• Posted by: Sam   <Send E-Mail>
• Date: Sunday, February 10, 2008, at 11:30 a.m.
• IP Address: ip68-230-189-161.dc.dc.cox.net
Message Edited: Sunday, February 10, 2008, at 4:48 p.m.

First, I must congratulate Christian for his in-depth review. I don't always agree with his reviews, but here I think he's absolutely right about the score's strengths and weaknesses. And that is interesting news that they actually filmed scenes depicing the ending of the book but didn't use them in the film. This explains why the end-credits song, "Lyra," contains the lyric, "two worlds collide around her," which is EXACTLY what happens at the end of the book, but not in the film.

I saw the film before reading the book, but, even then, noticed something wrong with the ending. It violates the cardinal rule of screenwriting, "show, don't tell." We're told, second-hand, what happend to Lord Asriel, instead of being given a climactic scene with him. And Lyra's speech, essentially outlining what she's going to do in the sequels, though it's good and heroic, belongs in a stage play, not in a movie.

Not so in the book, the final scenes of which are nothing less than astounding. The usual excuse that a movie has to be different from a book to be more cinematic, doesn't play here, for this is a case where the book's ending is WAY more cinematic than the way the film ends. So, what I want to know is, what in all the parallel universes was director Chris Wietz thinking, when he chopped it off?! Or was the cut forced upon him by studio pressure? Plus, how does he intend to film the sequels (if he ever gets to film them, which is now doubutful), for "en't" their plots entirely dependent on the climactic event in "The Golden Compass"?




Comments in this Thread:     Expand >>


Copyright © 1998-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast,
rewritten or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. Scoreboard created 7/24/98 and last updated 4/25/15.