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Comments about the soundtrack for Hannibal (Hans Zimmer)
transcripts

aho
(pec-82-1.tnt5.m2.uunet.de)


  Responses to this Comment:
Harry Adams
steve
transcripts   Wednesday, April 4, 2001 (1:13 p.m.) 

Hi,

Does anyone have a transcript of the "lyrics" ? I would love to actually read the words (especially from "Let my home be my gallows")

Would be great!

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Harry Adams
(ts06-067.dublin.indigo.ie)

  In Response to:
aho

  Responses to this Comment:
steve
DanteAl
Re: transcripts   Monday, October 29, 2001 (6:17 a.m.) 

Here they are, as far as I can make out:

'Dear Clarice,
I have followed with enthusiasm the course of your disgrace and public shaming. My own never bothered me, except for the inconvenience of being incarcerated, but you may lack perspective.

In our discussions down in the dungeon it was apparent to me that your father, the dead night watchman, figures largely in your value system. I think your success in putting an end to Jame Gumb's career as a couturier pleased you most because you could imagine your father being pleased. But now, alas, you're in bad odour with the FBI. Do you imagine your daddy being shamed by your disgrace? Do you see him in his plain pine box crushed by your failure, the sorry, petty end of a promising career?

What is worst about this humiliation, Clarice? Is it how your failure will reflect on your mommy and daddy? Is your worst fear that people will now and forever believe they were indeed just good old trailer camp, tornado-bait white trash, and that perhaps you are too?

By the way, I couldn't help noticing on the FBI's rather dull public website that I have been hoisted from the bureau's archives of the common criminal, and elevated to the more prestigious Ten Most Wanted List. Is this coincidence, or are you back on the case? If so, goody goody, because I need to come out of retirement and return to public life. Clearly, this new assignment is not your choice. Rather, I suppose it is part of the bargain, but you accepted it, Clarice. Your job is to craft my doom, so I'm not sure how well I should wish you. But I'm sure we'll have a lot of fun.

Ta-ta,
H.'

'Because of his avarice, and his betrayal of the Emperor's trust, Pierre De La Vinia was disgraced, blinded and imprisoned. Dante's pilgrim finds Pierre De La Vinia on the seventh level of The Inferno. Like Judas Iscariot, he died by hanging. But Judas and Pierre De La Vinia are linked in Dante by the avarice he saw in them. In fact hanging and avarice are linked in the medieval mind.

This is the earliest depiction of the Crucifixion, carved on an ivory box in Gaul, about A.D. 400. It includes the death, by hanging, of Judas, his face upturned to the branch that suspends him. Here he is again on the doors of the (sounds like 'Menemethem') cathedral, hanging. This time with his bowels falling out.

Now on this plate from the 15th century edition of The Inferno Pierre De La Vinia's body hangs from a bleeding tree. I will not belabour the obvious parallel with Judas Iscariot, but Dante Allegeri needed no drawn illustration. It is his genius to make Pierre De La Vinia, now in hell, speak in strained hisses and coughing syllables, almost as though he is hanging still.
(Words in Italian which I can't make out)
Avarice, hanging, self destruction.
(More Italian)
I made my own home be my gallows.'

'He woke her then, and trembling and obedient she ate that burning heart out of his hand. Weeping, I saw them then depart from me.

Could he daily feel a stab of hunger for her, and find nourishment in the very side of her? I think so. Would she see through the (sounds like 'bours') of his plight, and ache for him?'


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steve
<Send E-Mail>
(195.194.195.11)
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  In Response to:
Harry Adams

  Responses to this Comment:
LEO
Roberto
Hannibal and Dantes Inferno - translations and corrections   Wednesday, November 12, 2003 (9:27 a.m.) 

Hi, great site. Wonderful film albeit a little detracted from the book.

On a suitably academic note as would please Hannibal, 'H' is describing in the score the character which should be correctly identified as being Pier della Vigna. As a former advisor to Emperor Frederick II, della Vigna eventually committed suicide when he fell into disfavour at the court.

He was immortalised in Dantes Inferno where he was to spend eternity in the form of a tree. Virgil and Dante meet a group of Centaurs, creatures who are half man, half horse. One of them, Nessus, takes them into the Second Ring of the Seventh Circle of Hell, where they encounter those who were violent toward themselves (the Suicides). These souls must endure eternity in the form of trees. It is there that Dante speaks with Pier della Vigna.

Regards the Italian bit that is a little indistinguishable, it is From Canto XIII of The Inferno, by Dante Alighieri. it concerns the forests of the suicides that I have mentioned above. It goes along the lines of - "when the fierce soul has quit the fleshy case, it tore itself from, Minos sends it down. To the seventh depth. it falls to this wooded place. no chosen spot, but where fortune flings it in - and there it sprouts like a grain of spelt, to shoot up as a sapling, like a wild plant and then, the harpies, feeding on the foliage, create pain and an outlet for the pain as well. We too shall come like the rest, each one to get, his cast off body but not for us to dwell, within again for justice must forbid having what one has robbed oneself of. still, here we shall drag them, and through the mournful wood, our bodies will be hung with every one fixed on the thorn bush of its wounding shade. And I. I made my own home be my gallows".

At the end of the transcript, I believe that the obscured word is 'bars'. Ive tried slowing the track on CD, best I can make out. Once again, great stuff. Anyone interested in Dantes work and the references of 'H', they can find them made easily accessible, in an academic manner, at www.sparknotes.com/poetry/inferno/ the first 5 hyperlinks are free, the others are password and pay but these are enough to satisfy


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LEO
(216.242.79.61)

  In Response to:
steve
Re: Hannibal and Dantes Inferno - translations and corrections   Wednesday, December 17, 2003 (12:17 p.m.) 

Just a couple of things:

The name of the cathedral is Benevento (Benevento Cathedral)

Here are the words in italian from the Dante's Inferno, Canto XIII

Come l'altre verrem per nostre spoglie,
ma non però ch'alcuna sen rivesta,
ché non è giusto aver ciò ch'om si toglie.

Qui le trascineremo, e per la mesta
selva saranno i nostri corpi appesi,
ciascuno al prun de l'ombra sua molesta».

----------------------------------------------

Like others for our spoils shall we return;
But not that any one may them revest,
For 'tis not just to have what one casts off.

Here we shall drag them, and along the dismal
Forest our bodies shall suspended be,
Each to the thorn of his molested shade.

then, the last verse of the Canto XIII

Io fei gibbetto a me de le mie case

Enjoy!

> Hi, great site. Wonderful film albeit a little detracted from the book.

> On a suitably academic note as would please Hannibal, 'H' is describing in
> the score the character which should be correctly identified as being Pier
> della Vigna. As a former advisor to Emperor Frederick II, della Vigna
> eventually committed suicide when he fell into disfavour at the court.

> He was immortalised in Dantes Inferno where he was to spend eternity in
> the form of a tree. Virgil and Dante meet a group of Centaurs, creatures
> who are half man, half horse. One of them, Nessus, takes them into the
> Second Ring of the Seventh Circle of Hell, where they encounter those who
> were violent toward themselves (the Suicides). These souls must endure
> eternity in the form of trees. It is there that Dante speaks with Pier
> della Vigna.

> Regards the Italian bit that is a little indistinguishable, it is From
> Canto XIII of The Inferno, by Dante Alighieri. it concerns the forests of
> the suicides that I have mentioned above. It goes along the lines of -
> "when the fierce soul has quit the fleshy case, it tore itself from,
> Minos sends it down. To the seventh depth. it falls to this wooded place.
> no chosen spot, but where fortune flings it in - and there it sprouts like
> a grain of spelt, to shoot up as a sapling, like a wild plant and then,
> the harpies, feeding on the foliage, create pain and an outlet for the
> pain as well. We too shall come like the rest, each one to get, his cast
> off body but not for us to dwell, within again for justice must forbid
> having what one has robbed oneself of. still, here we shall drag them, and
> through the mournful wood, our bodies will be hung with every one fixed on
> the thorn bush of its wounding shade. And I. I made my own home be my
> gallows".

> At the end of the transcript, I believe that the obscured word is 'bars'.
> Ive tried slowing the track on CD, best I can make out. Once again, great
> stuff. Anyone interested in Dantes work and the references of 'H', they
> can find them made easily accessible, in an academic manner, at
> www.sparknotes.com/poetry/inferno/ the first 5 hyperlinks are free, the
> others are password and pay but these are enough to satisfy


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Roberto
<Send E-Mail>
(201-254-74-227.speedy.com.ar)

  In Response to:
steve
Re: Hannibal and Dantes Inferno - translations and corrections   Tuesday, February 21, 2006 (8:34 p.m.) 

Hi there, thank you for the kindest to post the quotes, coul someone tell me which font are you using on this site? it looks like a writing-machine.thanks
R.

> Hi, great site. Wonderful film albeit a little detracted from the book.

> On a suitably academic note as would please Hannibal, 'H' is describing in
> the score the character which should be correctly identified as being Pier
> della Vigna. As a former advisor to Emperor Frederick II, della Vigna
> eventually committed suicide when he fell into disfavour at the court.

> He was immortalised in Dantes Inferno where he was to spend eternity in
> the form of a tree. Virgil and Dante meet a group of Centaurs, creatures
> who are half man, half horse. One of them, Nessus, takes them into the
> Second Ring of the Seventh Circle of Hell, where they encounter those who
> were violent toward themselves (the Suicides). These souls must endure
> eternity in the form of trees. It is there that Dante speaks with Pier
> della Vigna.

> Regards the Italian bit that is a little indistinguishable, it is From
> Canto XIII of The Inferno, by Dante Alighieri. it concerns the forests of
> the suicides that I have mentioned above. It goes along the lines of -
> "when the fierce soul has quit the fleshy case, it tore itself from,
> Minos sends it down. To the seventh depth. it falls to this wooded place.
> no chosen spot, but where fortune flings it in - and there it sprouts like
> a grain of spelt, to shoot up as a sapling, like a wild plant and then,
> the harpies, feeding on the foliage, create pain and an outlet for the
> pain as well. We too shall come like the rest, each one to get, his cast
> off body but not for us to dwell, within again for justice must forbid
> having what one has robbed oneself of. still, here we shall drag them, and
> through the mournful wood, our bodies will be hung with every one fixed on
> the thorn bush of its wounding shade. And I. I made my own home be my
> gallows".

> At the end of the transcript, I believe that the obscured word is 'bars'.
> Ive tried slowing the track on CD, best I can make out. Once again, great
> stuff. Anyone interested in Dantes work and the references of 'H', they
> can find them made easily accessible, in an academic manner, at
> www.sparknotes.com/poetry/inferno/ the first 5 hyperlinks are free, the
> others are password and pay but these are enough to satisfy


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DanteAl
<Send E-Mail>
(201.26.11.37.dynamic.jazztel.es)

  In Response to:
Harry Adams
Re: transcripts   Sunday, February 3, 2013 (4:29 a.m.) 

"Here he is again on the doors of the (sounds like 'Menemethem') cathedral".

The cathedral is Benevento

> Here they are, as far as I can make out:

> 'Dear Clarice,
> I have followed with enthusiasm the course of your disgrace and public
> shaming. My own never bothered me, except for the inconvenience of being
> incarcerated, but you may lack perspective.

> In our discussions down in the dungeon it was apparent to me that your
> father, the dead night watchman, figures largely in your value system. I
> think your success in putting an end to Jame Gumb's career as a couturier
> pleased you most because you could imagine your father being pleased. But
> now, alas, you're in bad odour with the FBI. Do you imagine your daddy
> being shamed by your disgrace? Do you see him in his plain pine box
> crushed by your failure, the sorry, petty end of a promising career?

> What is worst about this humiliation, Clarice? Is it how your failure will
> reflect on your mommy and daddy? Is your worst fear that people will now
> and forever believe they were indeed just good old trailer camp,
> tornado-bait white trash, and that perhaps you are too?

> By the way, I couldn't help noticing on the FBI's rather dull public
> website that I have been hoisted from the bureau's archives of the common
> criminal, and elevated to the more prestigious Ten Most Wanted List. Is
> this coincidence, or are you back on the case? If so, goody goody, because
> I need to come out of retirement and return to public life. Clearly, this
> new assignment is not your choice. Rather, I suppose it is part of the
> bargain, but you accepted it, Clarice. Your job is to craft my doom, so
> I'm not sure how well I should wish you. But I'm sure we'll have a lot of
> fun.

> Ta-ta,
> H.'

> 'Because of his avarice, and his betrayal of the Emperor's trust, Pierre
> De La Vinia was disgraced, blinded and imprisoned. Dante's pilgrim finds
> Pierre De La Vinia on the seventh level of The Inferno. Like Judas
> Iscariot, he died by hanging. But Judas and Pierre De La Vinia are linked
> in Dante by the avarice he saw in them. In fact hanging and avarice are
> linked in the medieval mind.

> This is the earliest depiction of the Crucifixion, carved on an ivory box
> in Gaul, about A.D. 400. It includes the death, by hanging, of Judas, his
> face upturned to the branch that suspends him. Here he is again on the
> doors of the (sounds like 'Menemethem') cathedral, hanging. This time with
> his bowels falling out.

> Now on this plate from the 15th century edition of The Inferno Pierre De
> La Vinia's body hangs from a bleeding tree. I will not belabour the
> obvious parallel with Judas Iscariot, but Dante Allegeri needed no drawn
> illustration. It is his genius to make Pierre De La Vinia, now in hell,
> speak in strained hisses and coughing syllables, almost as though he is
> hanging still.
> (Words in Italian which I can't make out)
> Avarice, hanging, self destruction.
> (More Italian)
> I made my own home be my gallows.'

> 'He woke her then, and trembling and obedient she ate that burning heart
> out of his hand. Weeping, I saw them then depart from me.

> Could he daily feel a stab of hunger for her, and find nourishment in the
> very side of her? I think so. Would she see through the (sounds like
> 'bours') of his plight, and ache for him?'



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steve
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(195.194.195.11)
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  In Response to:
aho
the 'burning heart' piece   Wednesday, November 12, 2003 (10:08 a.m.) 

Hello again,
Just to cast a little more light on the final words in the transcript with regards to the 'burning heart' passage ;

the score is (MY LADY LAY ASLEEP, WRAPPED IN A VALE) HE WOKE HER THEN, AND TREMBLING AND OBEDIENT , SHE ATE THAT BURNING HEART OUT OF HIS HAND. WEEPING, I SAW HIM THEN DEPART FROM ME. DO YOU BELIEVE THAT A MAN COULD BECOME SO OBSESSED WITH A WOMAN FROM A SINGLE ENCOUNTER? COULD HE DAILY FEEL A STAB OF HUNGER FOR HER? FIND NOURISHMENT IN THE VERY SIGHT OF HER? I THINK SO. BUT WOULD SHE SEE THROUGH THE BARS OF HIS PLIGHT, AND ACHE FOR HIM?

A beautiful piece.

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