SUPPORT FILMTRACKS! CLICK HERE FIRST:
Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk
iTunes (U.S.)
Amazon.ca
Amazon.fr
eBay (U.S.)
Amazon.de
Amazon.es
Half.com
Glisten Effect
Editorial Reviews
Scoreboard Forum
Viewer Ratings
Composers
Awards
   NEWEST MAJOR REVIEWS:
     1. Transformers: Last Knight
    2. Cars 3
   3. The Mummy
  4. Wonder Woman
 5. POTC: Dead Men Tell No Tales
6. Alien: Covenant


   CURRENT BEST-SELLING SCORES:
       1. Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
      2. Fantastic Beasts/Find Them
     3. Willow
    4. The Ghost and the Darkness
   5. An American Tail
  6. The Wind and the Lion
 7. Doctor Strange
8. 10 Cloverfield Lane
   CURRENT MOST POPULAR REVIEWS:
         1. Star Wars: Force Awakens
        2. E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
       3. Titanic
      4. Avatar
     5. Nineteen Eighty-Four
    6. Gladiator
   7. Star Wars: A New Hope
  8. Animal Farm
 9. LOTR: Fellowship of the Ring
10. Harry Potter: Sorcerer's Stone
Home Page
Menu Options ▼
Comments about the soundtrack for The Hurt Locker (Marco Beltrami/Buck Sanders)
Solid effort, but... strange

Flo
<Send E-Mail>
(g224126041.adsl.alicedsl.de)
Profile Picture

  Responses to this Comment:
Scott W. Williams
Solid effort, but... strange   Tuesday, March 2, 2010 (10:07 a.m.) 

I can't really agree with the review. It is indeed a pretty strange score. Haven't seen the film, and most likely never will, because the subject matter doesn't really interest my I only got this score because I like the style Beltrami has evolved to.
It's pretty difficult to really appreciate this thing, and it's not a score I would listen to all day, or maybe more than once a while. But somehow, I find the ideas pretty cool and fresh. Today I watched a Vince DiCola interview and he mentioned something that I thought was pretty interesting. It was along the lines that he'd like to see more synthesizers utilized in filmscoring as it's currently very centered on orchestra-heavy music. Now I don't wan to be disrespectful or anything but I tend to agree with him. This score is different for a change, maybe not the most pleasant thing around, but different.

To those people who speak of this more as sound effect than music, I think that you don't need a motiv or melody for everything. Sometimes a certain sound suffices (I think of what Zimmer did with the Joker Theme). Totally depends on what you are aiming for. So I wouldn't bash those people who like this score with sarcastic comments about them having some emotional problem. If that were so, what about those people who listen to - for instance - Wagner a lot?

Cheers



Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


Scott W. Williams
<Send E-Mail>
(adsl-250-182-99.ard.bellsouth.net)

  In Response to:
Flo

  Responses to this Comment:
Flo
Re: Solid effort, but... strange   Tuesday, March 2, 2010 (11:33 a.m.) 

> This score is different for a change, maybe not
> the most pleasant thing around, but different.

If nothing else, that is so true. Which is one of the reasons I think it's Oscar-worthy.

> To those people who speak of this more as sound effect than music, I think
> that you don't need a motiv or melody for everything. Sometimes a certain
> sound suffices (I think of what Zimmer did with the Joker Theme). Totally
> depends on what you are aiming for. So I wouldn't bash those people who
> like this score with sarcastic comments about them having some emotional
> problem.

Great point about the Zimmer Joker Theme. That was a really interesting idea of his, so simple and different but worked just as well as any melody could have. It suggested a cold, aloof and menacing theme for the joker with just a slow rising synth noise.


Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


Flo
<Send E-Mail>
(g224126041.adsl.alicedsl.de)
Profile Picture
  In Response to:
Scott W. Williams

  Responses to this Comment:
Scott W. Williams
Re: Solid effort, but... strange   Tuesday, March 2, 2010 (1:26 p.m.) 

>Which is one of the reasons I think it's Oscar-worthy.
I am not sure if I would give anything for Oscar-Nomination or not. The score is a strong entry in Beltramis work, the Oscars on the other hand is the most opinionated, studio-controlled - and worthless - award that there is. (Speaking for that part of the world population that has to live with sharing ONE best foreign movie award )
As I mentioned earlier I'd like to see other people come forward with the kind of instrumental creativity as Beltrami does. He may not be the "best"(who is the best anyway?) composer in the world but he sure has an interesting voice and from what I have seen in interviews he is very interested in approaching a score from a fresh point of view. Something I thought - that was long ago, after listening to his Scream and other horror scores - he would never achieve. Alas I was wrong

> Great point about the Zimmer Joker Theme. That was a really interesting
> idea of his, so simple and different but worked just as well as any melody
> could have. It suggested a cold, aloof and menacing theme for the joker
> with just a slow rising synth noise.

I also think it gave the actor more room as other themes do. The Joker was a lot about improvisation and that theme, although just one note, somehow also had a very improvisatory feel to it. I am usually not into the recent Zimmer scores, but sometimes he manages to surprise me

Cheers


Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


Scott W. Williams
<Send E-Mail>
(adsl-250-182-99.ard.bellsouth.net)

  In Response to:
Flo

  Responses to this Comment:
Scott W. Williams
Flo
Re: Solid effort, but... strange   Tuesday, March 2, 2010 (1:58 p.m.) 

> The score is a strong entry in Beltramis work, the Oscars on the other hand > is the most opinionated, studio-controlled - and worthless - award there
> is.

Well I definitely agree that the Oscars are generally worthless, in the film score game recognition is seldom achieved on such a large scale as the Academy Awards, film scores aren't usually supposed to call a lot of attention to themselves, and for Beltrami and Sanders to finally be recognized in a very public forum I think is exciting, long overdue (in my opinion), and important.

> As I mentioned earlier I'd like to see other people come forward with the
> kind of instrumental creativity as Beltrami does. He may not be the
> "best"(who is the best anyway?) composer in the world but he
> sure has an interesting voice and from what I have seen in interviews he
> is very interested in approaching a score from a fresh point of view.

I wish more people understood how hard Beltrami (and Sanders) work to approach each project with a fresh perspective and originality. It might not always shine through in the final product because ultimately it's the director's or studio's wishes, but Beltrami is an unsung hero in trying new and experimental things, not resting on his laurels. Unfortunately a lot of these bold efforts are not known because the scores and/or movies are often dismissed or ignored, but what other composers use cacti needles as a musical instrument (3 Burials)? What other composers use the sound of a piano pedal being pushed and depressed (The Omen)? What other composers use an old grandfather clock (3:10 to Yuma)? What other composers would use a sample frog sound from the Smithsonian sound effect library (Crow Salvation)? What other composers derive most of their score from different ways a piano can be played (or electronically altered, or beat on, or torn apart, like in Captivity)? What other composers pay such subtle tribute to original scores by Kamen, Goldsmith, Fiedel and Morricone while retaining his own distinct style (Die Hard 4, Omen, Yuma)? What other composer was described by teacher Jerry Goldsmith as the future of film scoring? I think Jerry would know. In fact I trust Jerry's taste in modern film music more than any website review. The fact that Beltrami was trained closely by such an enduring and dearly departed legend of film scoring as Goldsmith, with his endorsement and recognition, speaks highly of Beltrami's willingness to experiment, toil often thanklessly, and continued promise. Through my detailed research of Marco's work, career, and inventive ideas, as well as attendance at his Die Hard 4 scoring session, I have learned that Beltrami is so much more than his body of work reflects to the casual or even seasoned film score listener -- although he's achieved a remarkable level of artistry in his (so far) short 14 years composing...

...in my deeply heartfelt opinion.

I know a lot of people don't care for Beltrami's music. The average ranking vote on this website indicates this as well. A lot of people don't care for James Horner's repetition of his and others' work, a lot of people don't care for the "soulless" quality of Hans Zimmer's proteges' work, a lot of people don't care for the electronic trend in film scoring, a lot of people don't like this or that...I am happy to say I don't look at listening to film scores this way. I just enjoy it. I don't focus on negative, or what it's not, or what it could be (most of the time), I just find composers or scores that I admire and I listen to them and I'm happy. This is not to say that I disagree with people who are intensely critical of film scores or composers, because I think it's important to have standards and tastes, I just don't focus on it. I focus on the fact that I'm glad that I love film music, I'm glad it's available to hear, I enjoy examining different composers, different approaches, different ideas, how a composition is designed, why, what different colors or textures are used, how it integrates with the film. I love what I listen to and I love that I can enjoy it so purely and be entertained or moved or excited while still intellectually able to appreciate the art and science behind the profession. Whew! Sorry for rambling!



Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


Scott W. Williams
<Send E-Mail>
(adsl-250-182-99.ard.bellsouth.net)

  In Response to:
Scott W. Williams
One More Thing!   Tuesday, March 2, 2010 (2:25 p.m.) 

One more thing that I love about Beltrami (and yes I'm aware that I have too much time on my hands for writing all of this and I'm sure not that many people will even read it but I rarely get a chance to praise Beltrami publicly)...what he did with the Scream trilogy. I've had the intense pleasure of hearing all three complete scores, which I don't think a lot of people have unfortunately. I thought his score for the first Scream was very intelligent and brave for his first big film score. His sound wasn't as mature but you could hear so much promise. If you examine the complete scores for the trilogy, you discover how hard he worked on all three, never getting lazy but continuing to challenge himself. He could have easily done cut-and-paste but he developed each score from the previous, and made it increasingly large scale. There are at least a dozen small motifs that are peppered throughout the trilogy in different variations as well as a few great themes that are given different orchestrations or power as the series went on. The way Beltrami adapts while honoring his main theme for Sidney is incredible, utilizing a female vocal in many different ways, including adding a harmonious male vocal in the third movie to represent Sidney's brother, culminating in a glorious and heavenly presentation at the end of the trilogy, eliminating subtle dread and replacing it with triumph. James Horner recently said in an interview that the "operatic" type of film scoring done in films like Star Wars, where each character or mood had it's own theme, isn't done anymore. Beltrami did it in the Scream trilogy, only not as recognizably or as easy to whistle after hearing. He had a theme for Sidney, a western motif for Dewey (that was mangled by Zimmer's replacement), a love theme for Dewey and Gale, a descending-note motif for Ghostface, a mystery theme, countless motifs and recurring sounds, interpreted differently as the trilogy went on. I'm terribly excited to see what they would do with Scream 4, which I predict will happen with Beltrami. I enjoy complete scores because I find it intellectually rewarding and relentlessly entertaining to see each tiny detail, from incidental 0:30 second cues to 10:00 extravaganzas, and appreciate how it can (if done well) come together. For a lot of scores, in my opinion, hearing partial scores is like reading a novel with chapters missing...you might get the overall point and hit the high notes, but it's not as rich and rewarding and deep an experience without all of the colors and details. Certainly a lot of cues in a score are written and recorded only because the director insisted and I can't blame a composer for not wanting to release those cues or cues that the composer feels aren't interesting, but for a guy like me who revels in exploring all of the details of a film score complete scores are a gift. That's why I wish there would be a complete presentation of the Scream trilogy, to showcase how not one but three scores can be tied together, expanded upon, developed, and explored by a composer who is really working hard to come up with new and exciting material and new and exciting variations on original content. Thanks for reading, just a fan!


Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


Flo
<Send E-Mail>
(g224126041.adsl.alicedsl.de)
Profile Picture
  In Response to:
Scott W. Williams
Re: Solid effort, but... strange   Tuesday, March 2, 2010 (4:18 p.m.) 

>Whew! Sorry for rambling!
Long post .

In essence... and much shorter ... you are right.
But I guess it's the same as it was when John Williams composed the music for Star Wars. Currently Hollywood favours selling every aspect of it's productions - and challenging scores being not exactly your idea of a best seller - so they tend to demand stuff that is either pretty bland and only appeals to people the same way that radio makes you buy a CD in a store. Countless repetition.

> I just don't focus on it. I focus
> on the fact that I'm glad that I love film music, I'm glad it's available
> to hear, I enjoy examining different composers, different approaches,
> different ideas, how a composition is designed, why, what different colors
> or textures are used, how it integrates with the film. I love what I
> listen to and I love that I can enjoy it so purely and be entertained or
> moved or excited while still intellectually able to appreciate the art and
> science behind the profession.

Same goes for me. I listen to a lot of different composers. Why? Because I like what they do. Hans Zimmers orchestral works are not really appealing to me, but he composes the hell-of-a-music for smaller ensembles (smaller for HIM) like Black Hawk Down. A lot of people don't like it, i find it terrific. it's something different from a guy who has come to a point where at least I feel that I have heard it one too many times.
So when something as crazy and different as this score by Marco Beltrami comes around, it's like... Hey, that sounds interesting. I know Beltrami can do good things with an orchestra and he knows a lot about electronic effects. But here... that's new. I hope - better, know - he won't abandon his other way, but it's nice to hear something different for a change.
So - to other people who think like Christian in this review - give this thing a chance.



Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display



Copyright © 1998-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast,
rewritten or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. Scoreboard created 7/24/98 and last updated 4/25/15.