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Comments about the soundtrack for In Dreams (Elliot Goldenthal)
Non-Classical Score?

Josh
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  Responses to this Comment:
Christian Clemmensen
Non-Classical Score?   Wednesday, July 30, 2003 (8:15 a.m.) 

"[...] the composer's inaccessible style that ignores the norms of classical and contemporary music."

Uh, what?

While I'm happy that the reviewer finally seems to be digging a Goldenthal score, I think that said reviewer's classical knowledge is limited to those mass-produced Mozart-and-Beethoven grab-bag CDs. There is something called the avant-garde, which dawned near the beginning of the past century, going against the grain in more ways than one with regards to musical compositions. Atonality, serialism, pushing instruments to their extreme limits, experiments in masses of sound, dissonance, musique concrète, the emergence of mistiness-clarity, and a bunch of other things came to and Goldenthal makes use of some of those in his scores all the time.

So, to say that he ignores the rules of contemporary music is to show, very blatantly, that one does not know what contemporary music is.

It's not John Williams. Not by a long shot.

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Christian Clemmensen
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  In Response to:
Josh

  Responses to this Comment:
Will
Re: Non-Classical Score?   Wednesday, July 30, 2003 (9:16 a.m.) 

> I think that said reviewer's classical knowledge is limited to
> those mass-produced Mozart-and-Beethoven grab-bag CDs. There is something
> called the avant-garde, which dawned near the beginning of the past
> century, going against the grain in more ways than one with regards to
> musical compositions. Atonality, serialism, pushing instruments to their
> extreme limits, experiments in masses of sound, dissonance, musique
> concrète, the emergence of mistiness-clarity, and a bunch of other things
> came to and Goldenthal makes use of some of those in his scores all the
> time.

Yes, and knowing several people who have performed in orchestras for decades, I don't know a single person who actually ENJOYS performing "masses of sound." The San Francisco Symphony union fought to wear earplugs while performing avant-garde dissonance.

Are you willing to defend avant-garde styles as the overriding historical norm of all classical music? I doubt it. You need to check the definition of the word "norm"...

> So, to say that he ignores the rules of contemporary music is to show,
> very blatantly, that one does not know what contemporary music is.

How can you make such a definitive statement about such a vauge term like "contemporary"?

It amazes me... the distance to which Goldenthal fans seem to go to challenge a rather mundane, non-descript sentence in an otherwise untroubled review...

Christian



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Will
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  In Response to:
Christian Clemmensen
Re: Non-Classical Score?   Tuesday, November 4, 2003 (1:09 p.m.) 

> Yes, and knowing several people who have performed in orchestras for
> decades, I don't know a single person who actually ENJOYS performing
> "masses of sound." The San Francisco Symphony union fought to
> wear earplugs while performing avant-garde dissonance.

I can understand your statement here. I used to work for Sony Pictures and would often talk to the musicians on their way to score films (and once sent a bottle of wine to Ken Wannberg, John Williams, and Steven Spielberg when they scored "Catch Me If You Can") and they didn't care for Goldenthal's music, maybe because it's difficult to perform and the antithesis of the classics many of them are used to. Personally, I love Goldenthal's scores and think he has a fresh approach.

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