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Comments about the soundtrack for Inception (Hans Zimmer)
Too bad...

Bram Brouwers
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(82-171-81-225.ip.telfort.nl)


  Responses to this Comment:
Blake Perdue
Too bad...   Saturday, July 31, 2010 (2:01 a.m.) 

... The allknowing reviewer didn't include this link between Zimmer's composition and the Piaf's 'kick-song' which is used throughout the movie:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q2sD3QvwnjY


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Blake Perdue
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(c-24-16-180-16.hsd1.wa.comcast.ne
t)

  In Response to:
Bram Brouwers

  Responses to this Comment:
SmokeyPSD
Re: Too bad...   Sunday, August 1, 2010 (10:17 p.m.) 
• Now Playing: Waiting For a Train - Inception  

> ... The allknowing reviewer didn't include this link between Zimmer's
> composition and the Piaf's 'kick-song' which is used throughout the movie:

> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q2sD3QvwnjY

Yes. I thought this was pretty obvious while viewing the film. While I appreciate that, this score as a whole wasn't correctly expressing the mood of certain scenes, and there were no themes to build on. If you think that part of the movie's score was well constructed, then more power to you. I think it's pretty cool, but that was one track out of the entire score. Everything else was derivative of his previous blockbuster formulas. I don't think that take on Piaf's song is absolutely brilliant like so many others (I'm not saying you do), because while he uses it and it's thoughtful, MUSICALLY he sticks to his dark knight rhythm layers and string staccato lines. During that climactic act, his arrangement of this track could have really been balls to the wall with not just the complexity of the music, but trying to express the emotions of each shot. The track is emotionally stationary.

The reason we appreciate Inception's(FILM) ability to ask questions and are so willing to dive into story related theory-crafting is because we can appreciate that the medium(FILM) these ideas take place in are well constructed. Nolan sets up well framed shots and surpasses most movies this year in terms of cinematography. And as filmspotting says, he weaves in many genres of film sucessfully.

The reason many on filmtracks aren't willing to give in to the concept that Zimmer's score is groundbreaking or truly deep is because the medium (score) those ideas take place in aren't that interesting. Why should we care when, really, it doesn't do its job as a film score. ie expressing what each scene NEEDED, having more themes than the two loose "dreaming/ unknown of reality" that blares for over a half an hour straight. The scene with Mal jumping was tragic, yet was hindered by the score's lack of punctuation.

Zimmer definitely put a lot of thought into this score. Just didn't put in a lot of -work- into the compositional and arrangement side of things. He may have, but many of us are just kinda disappointed that they're just not nearly as expressive and engaging as some of his much better works.

I don't think this score is -bad-. Besides it's really well mixed and feels pleasing to the ear.


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SmokeyPSD
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rnode.on.net)

  In Response to:
Blake Perdue

  Responses to this Comment:
Blake Perdue
GK
Re: Too bad...   Wednesday, August 4, 2010 (11:41 a.m.) 
• Now Playing: Chinatown - 11 - J.J. Gittis  

> Yes. I thought this was pretty obvious while viewing the film. While I
> appreciate that, this score as a whole wasn't correctly expressing the
> mood of certain scenes, and there were no themes to build on. If you think
> that part of the movie's score was well constructed, then more power to
> you. I think it's pretty cool, but that was one track out of the entire
> score. Everything else was derivative of his previous blockbuster
> formulas. I don't think that take on Piaf's song is absolutely brilliant
> like so many others (I'm not saying you do), because while he uses it and
> it's thoughtful, MUSICALLY he sticks to his dark knight rhythm layers and
> string staccato lines. During that climactic act, his arrangement of this
> track could have really been balls to the wall with not just the
> complexity of the music, but trying to express the emotions of each shot.
> The track is emotionally stationary.

> The reason we appreciate Inception's(FILM) ability to ask questions and
> are so willing to dive into story related theory-crafting is because we
> can appreciate that the medium(FILM) these ideas take place in are well
> constructed. Nolan sets up well framed shots and surpasses most movies
> this year in terms of cinematography. And as filmspotting says, he weaves
> in many genres of film sucessfully.

> The reason many on filmtracks aren't willing to give in to the concept
> that Zimmer's score is groundbreaking or truly deep is because the medium
> (score) those ideas take place in aren't that interesting. Why should we
> care when, really, it doesn't do its job as a film score. ie expressing
> what each scene NEEDED, having more themes than the two loose
> "dreaming/ unknown of reality" that blares for over a half an
> hour straight. The scene with Mal jumping was tragic, yet was hindered by
> the score's lack of punctuation.

> Zimmer definitely put a lot of thought into this score. Just didn't put in
> a lot of -work- into the compositional and arrangement side of things. He
> may have, but many of us are just kinda disappointed that they're just not
> nearly as expressive and engaging as some of his much better works.

> I don't think this score is -bad-. Besides it's really well mixed and
> feels pleasing to the ear.

Quite honestly your reply just comes off as a snob, seriously. so it was obvious to you that it was a feature of the soundtrack... So? He enjoyed the mechanism of the slowed tune, obvious or not, what difference does it make. You may have found that the score didn't suit the mood and tone of the scenes in the film, that's all fine and dandy but come on? Is your opinion really gospel or really matter that much? There are a great many other people, who would differ with you, are you saying they don't "understand" film music, or even film as much as you? I'm sorry if it sounds like I'm attacking you, I guess I'm aiming this more at just the community at large at filmtracks, because some people need a real wake up call.

I've been around filmtracks for quite awhile now and I'm by no means a Hans Zimmer follower, but it's really starting to get my goat this elitist bull that is starting to be prevalent on filmtracks now on here that it's cool to hate on him and others. I actually found the score for Inception fantastic and quite honestly, I haven't cared for many scores of late, I was looking forward to Predators with Debney even though I wanted Silvestri to do it still but even that was pretty mediocre. The point is that film writing is in a pretty big slump right now and what good is it achieving this antisocial atmosphere on this website to boot?

Inception provided an interesting soundscape to it all and quite a few moments i was intrigued by it while I was watching the film, that's more than can be said for so many films for the past 3 years. In the end though that's neither here nor there, whatever happened to giving respect to one another and eachothers differing opinions on the 1 interest we share, film scores.



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Blake Perdue
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t)

  In Response to:
SmokeyPSD

  Responses to this Comment:
SmokeyPSD
Re: Too bad...   Wednesday, August 4, 2010 (4:10 p.m.) 
• Now Playing: Bolt (Original Motion Picture Score) - Sing-along Rhino  

> Quite honestly your reply just comes off as a snob, seriously. so it was
> obvious to you that it was a feature of the soundtrack... So? He enjoyed
> the mechanism of the slowed tune, obvious or not, what difference does it
> make. You may have found that the score didn't suit the mood and tone of
> the scenes in the film, that's all fine and dandy but come on? Is your
> opinion really gospel or really matter that much? There are a great many
> other people, who would differ with you, are you saying they don't
> "understand" film music, or even film as much as you? I'm sorry
> if it sounds like I'm attacking you, I guess I'm aiming this more at just
> the community at large at filmtracks, because some people need a real wake
> up call.

> I've been around filmtracks for quite awhile now and I'm by no means a
> Hans Zimmer follower, but it's really starting to get my goat this elitist
> bull that is starting to be prevalent on filmtracks now on here that it's
> cool to hate on him and others. I actually found the score for Inception
> fantastic and quite honestly, I haven't cared for many scores of late, I
> was looking forward to Predators with Debney even though I wanted
> Silvestri to do it still but even that was pretty mediocre. The point is
> that film writing is in a pretty big slump right now and what good is it
> achieving this antisocial atmosphere on this website to boot?

> Inception provided an interesting soundscape to it all and quite a few
> moments i was intrigued by it while I was watching the film, that's more
> than can be said for so many films for the past 3 years. In the end though
> that's neither here nor there, whatever happened to giving respect to one
> another and eachothers differing opinions on the 1 interest we share, film
> scores.

Sorry my post right out the gate was pretty dickish. Anyway, I'm just trying to defend my side of the fence with justifications. I don't think my words are gospel or anything. OP's post felt like it's trying to jab at the editor's intellect and I wanna defend the editor a little. There seems to be a big war raging on these boards and not enough justification on either sides. Actually, the "I think Inception is a great score" side is doing most of the justifying, just to deaf ears. Just wanna defend Team B. While I think the traits used in my post are ingredients for a good film score, does that mean I think everyone should take those traits to heart? Absolutely not! I use them though because it's just what I've found to work for me.

I encourage anybody to love a film score as much as they can. That being said, I also think people should be okay with the fact that people won't like that film score as much as them.

Anyway, I'm just as new to filmtracks as the new inception folks, so I'm not part of any hivemind. Yet... >.>



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SmokeyPSD
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rnode.on.net)

  In Response to:
Blake Perdue
Re: Too bad...   Thursday, August 5, 2010 (1:40 a.m.) 

> Sorry my post right out the gate was pretty dickish. Anyway, I'm just
> trying to defend my side of the fence with justifications. I don't think
> my words are gospel or anything. OP's post felt like it's trying to jab at
> the editor's intellect and I wanna defend the editor a little. There seems
> to be a big war raging on these boards and not enough justification on
> either sides. Actually, the "I think Inception is a great score"
> side is doing most of the justifying, just to deaf ears. Just wanna defend
> Team B. While I think the traits used in my post are ingredients for a
> good film score, does that mean I think everyone should take those traits
> to heart? Absolutely not! I use them though because it's just what I've
> found to work for me.

> I encourage anybody to love a film score as much as they can. That being
> said, I also think people should be okay with the fact that people won't
> like that film score as much as them.

> Anyway, I'm just as new to filmtracks as the new inception folks, so I'm
> not part of any hivemind. Yet... >.>

Thanks for the great reply Blake, I dont have a problem with differing views. The problem I see forming with this atmosphere is that it is completely confrontational, often real debate and discussion getting lost, and it's just degenerating, almost to the infantile atmosphere of the console fanboy mentality. GK in his reply just reitirated my point. That he's not being a snob when he's belittling someone else's opininon, he just simply has more "experience" as a film score lover. With his lack of respect, I beg to differ

I enjoyed Inception, but I have quite a experienced and developed knowledge of film scores so that's just sheer and utter bull. I also study, write and perform music. Is GK saying that my love for the silent Benhur score, the omen, the good the bad and the ugly are all terrible scores aswell, I need more "experience" as my appreciation of Inception shows a lack of musical knowledge and knowledge of scores in general and their use in film.


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GK
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m)
Profile Picture
  In Response to:
SmokeyPSD
Re: Too bad...   Wednesday, August 4, 2010 (6:38 p.m.) 

> Quite honestly your reply just comes off as a snob, seriously. so it was
> obvious to you that it was a feature of the soundtrack... So? He enjoyed
> the mechanism of the slowed tune, obvious or not, what difference does it
> make. You may have found that the score didn't suit the mood and tone of
> the scenes in the film, that's all fine and dandy but come on? Is your
> opinion really gospel or really matter that much?

It's no gospel, it's just a realistic view on a very mediocre and lifeless score.
And having a lot of knowledge and experience with film music isn't being a "snob", it's the ability to sort out the bland and ordinary from the extraordinary.

> There are a great many
> other people, who would differ with you, are you saying they don't
> "understand" film music, or even film as much as you?

If someone indulged himself in cooking every day for two years, he has developed a finer sense for flavours and a better hand for products than someone who just started yesterday.
It's not "snobbish", it's the way life works.

People who listen less to film music understand less than those who listen to it regulary. It's that simple.

Live and learn.
Those who have less experience would do good listening to those having more, than just stomp their foot on the groud and say "you're snobbish".


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