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Comments about the soundtrack for The Lone Ranger (Hans Zimmer/Various)
the Finale

whez08
(c-24-147-192-16.hsd1.ma.comcast.n
et)


  Responses to this Comment:
BruinRogue
Jacque
the Finale   Saturday, July 27, 2013 (10:52 p.m.) 

This "Finale" track has a really high IQ indeed. It keeps the intensity without watering down the intelligent blending of Rossini with Zimmer for a single moment. I don't know how many pages it takes to fill up 10 minutes with fully orchestrated music, but it must be an insane amount of work. Yet not at the expense of creativity.

RC is like a factory that spits out a new talent every once in a while. Wonder if one day Hans Zimmer will say about Zanelli what he once admitted about John Powell (being better composer than him). Respect for everybody who worked on that score, though Zanelli steals the show.

Thanks for another fair and objective review.



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BruinRogue
(156.111.195.20)

  In Response to:
whez08

  Responses to this Comment:
Pawel Stroinski
Re: the Finale   Sunday, July 28, 2013 (4:46 p.m.) 

> This "Finale" track has a really high IQ indeed. It keeps the
> intensity without watering down the intelligent blending of Rossini with
> Zimmer for a single moment. I don't know how many pages it takes to fill
> up 10 minutes with fully orchestrated music, but it must be an insane
> amount of work. Yet not at the expense of creativity.

> RC is like a factory that spits out a new talent every once in a while.
> Wonder if one day Hans Zimmer will say about Zanelli what he once admitted
> about John Powell (being better composer than him). Respect for everybody
> who worked on that score, though Zanelli steals the show.

> Thanks for another fair and objective review.

The Finale track is probably one of the best tracks I've heard all year. I will be following at Zanelli's career with great interest. He's managed to use Zimmer themes into a very outstanding and compatible piece. I wanted For God and for Country, Ride, The Railroad Waits for No One to wow me but they were just passable at best. Still, it was much better than the debacle known as Man of Steel where you had both a horrible director and a composer who's a shell of his former self.


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Pawel Stroinski
(dll163.neoplus.adsl.tpnet.pl)
Profile Picture
  In Response to:
BruinRogue
Re: the Finale   Monday, July 29, 2013 (4:20 a.m.) 

> The Finale track is probably one of the best tracks I've heard all year. I
> will be following at Zanelli's career with great interest. He's managed to
> use Zimmer themes into a very outstanding and compatible piece. I wanted
> For God and for Country, Ride, The Railroad Waits for No One to wow me but
> they were just passable at best. Still, it was much better than the
> debacle known as Man of Steel where you had both a horrible director and a
> composer who's a shell of his former self.

When you consider additional music in RCP scores, you have to be aware that the ghostwriters are responsible for the writing itself, but *not* the general concept. Zimmer is giving them exact outline which theme to include where and in what way. It's not exactly brimming with creativity.

In case of the Overture, Zimmer seemingly didn't really want to have anything to do with the Rossini piece. Not out of his laziness, according to Verbinski he was against using it at all, but finally caved in to the director's demands, telling him that the Overture will be dealt with only after the rest of the thematic material is set up.



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Jacque
(97-118-101-5.hlrn.qwest.net)

  In Response to:
whez08

  Responses to this Comment:
Edmund Meinerts
whez08
Re: the Finale   Monday, July 29, 2013 (8:26 a.m.) 

> This "Finale" track has a really high IQ indeed. It keeps the
> intensity without watering down the intelligent blending of Rossini with
> Zimmer for a single moment. I don't know how many pages it takes to fill
> up 10 minutes with fully orchestrated music, but it must be an insane
> amount of work. Yet not at the expense of creativity.

> RC is like a factory that spits out a new talent every once in a while.
> Wonder if one day Hans Zimmer will say about Zanelli what he once admitted
> about John Powell (being better composer than him). Respect for everybody
> who worked on that score, though Zanelli steals the show.

> Thanks for another fair and objective review.

I'm a little wary of all the praise for "Finale". The references to Zimmer's themes are clever but ultimately Rossini is the one responsible for the enjoyability of the track. He wrote all that great overture material. I'm confused why Clemmensen chose to give the score another star based on the track alone, it's just a placement of a famous classical piece that used to be the theme song for Lone Ranger. You don't have to work very hard when a dead composer has done most of the work for you.



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Edmund Meinerts
(p5b25984f.dip0.t-ipconnect.de)
Profile Picture
  In Response to:
Jacque
Re: the Finale   Monday, July 29, 2013 (9:39 a.m.) 

> I'm a little wary of all the praise for "Finale". The references
> to Zimmer's themes are clever but ultimately Rossini is the one
> responsible for the enjoyability of the track. He wrote all that great
> overture material. I'm confused why Clemmensen chose to give the score
> another star based on the track alone, it's just a placement of a famous
> classical piece that used to be the theme song for Lone Ranger. You don't
> have to work very hard when a dead composer has done most of the work for
> you.

But it's the way the overture is used and weaved in and out of the Zimmer themes and material that's so ingenious. It's certainly not "just" a placement of an existing cue.


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whez08
(c-24-147-192-16.hsd1.ma.comcast.n
et)

  In Response to:
Jacque

  Responses to this Comment:
Daniel Zuko
Victor L.
Re: the Finale   Monday, July 29, 2013 (11:46 a.m.) 

> I'm a little wary of all the praise for "Finale". The references
> to Zimmer's themes are clever but ultimately Rossini is the one
> responsible for the enjoyability of the track. He wrote all that great
> overture material. I'm confused why Clemmensen chose to give the score
> another star based on the track alone, it's just a placement of a famous
> classical piece that used to be the theme song for Lone Ranger. You don't
> have to work very hard when a dead composer has done most of the work for
> you.

I agree with Edmund Meinerts here. There are minutes of pure Zanelli's thematic work that fits the original Overture like they are one whole. Giving a composer a famous melody with the task of developing its extension is more challenging than writing from scratch, because he'd have to keep up with the level of talent in someone else's universe (style). Zanelli walks in William Tell shoes without making a wrong step and I only wish Rossini could hear it.

PS. Can you people list more examples of classics remade by modern film composers? Like this, and Hannibal by Zimmer...



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Daniel Zuko
<Send E-Mail>
(b120037f.virtua.com.br)

  In Response to:
whez08
Re: the Finale   Thursday, August 1, 2013 (6:46 p.m.) 

Anyone remembers "Kane" on C64 ?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZsR-rEuaeug

Pay special attention to the music...



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Victor L.
<Send E-Mail>
(c-e407e353.2412-9-64736c15.cust.b
redbandsbolaget.se)

  In Response to:
whez08
Re: the Finale   Wednesday, October 9, 2013 (11:50 a.m.) 

> I agree with Edmund Meinerts here. There are minutes of pure Zanelli's
> thematic work that fits the original Overture like they are one whole.
> Giving a composer a famous melody with the task of developing its
> extension is more challenging than writing from scratch, because he'd have
> to keep up with the level of talent in someone else's universe (style).
> Zanelli walks in William Tell shoes without making a wrong step and I only
> wish Rossini could hear it.

> PS. Can you people list more examples of classics remade by modern film
> composers? Like this, and Hannibal by Zimmer...

I agree that the "Finale" track struck me, atleast on the surface, as a very intelligent and playful piece of writing. It maintains the pace and tempo, yet allows flourishes and themes to weave in and out.

It reminded me of one of my last real noteworthy Zimmer tracks, which is "I don't think now is the best time" from the 3rd Pirates movie. It has a similar constant pace and weaves themes in and out to hit action points in the movie.
This track, aswell as the Finale, are the kinds of tracks where if you play them alot, and then watch the movie, you get more enjoyment out of the scene they pair with, because you can sense coming moments on screen.

The mix on the Pirates track below however is really muddy and dense, and it loses alot of playfulness and energy from the flat mix that buries most dynamic elements.

http://youtu.be/B5IlxIzL8mw?t=4m53s



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