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Comments about the soundtrack for Memoirs of a Geisha (John Williams)
Brilliant

Marcus Lewis
<Send E-Mail>
(24-180-172-173.dhcp.fdul.wi.chart
er.com)


  Responses to this Comment:
Mark2006
Brilliant   Sunday, December 25, 2005 (8:22 p.m.) 

Many of us have been writing about how well the score works on the album, which is true, but after I saw the film I appreciated the score even more. What we don't realize on album is just how incredible a job the Maestro does of matching the images on screen with these wonderful pieces. The sequence that the "Chairman's Waltz" underscores is beautifully fitting and adds an element that was not there before and, honestly, one I never would have imagined the scene having in the first place.

Someone earlier compared this score to Crouching Tiger and to The Last Samauri and those scores and Geisha are so different. The manner in which Williams not only accompanies the film, but also uplifts it is what seperates it from other Eastern scores. The skilled use of sync points throughout the entire film are remarkable and I'd almost forgotten they are his hallmark. On the MIB II Dvd Danny Elfman talks about using sync points in a movie because "that's how he writes" but his are incredibly clumsy compared to Williams' masterful display in Geisha.

In short, this score is a wonderful breath of fresh air that Williams continues to give us in the 21st century. From his new sounds in A.I. to the gray shades of Minority Report to the jazzy Catch Me If You Can to the wonderful Terminal, he has continued to re-invent himself and this year he should walk home with Oscar. Plus, he's done something the Academy loves -- written great music in an ethnic genre! Bravo, Maestro.

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Mark2006
<Send E-Mail>
(85.195.119.22)

  In Response to:
Marcus Lewis
Re: Brilliant   Sunday, March 12, 2006 (8:23 p.m.) 

> Many of us have been writing about how well the score works on the album,
> which is true, but after I saw the film I appreciated the score even more.
> What we don't realize on album is just how incredible a job the Maestro
> does of matching the images on screen with these wonderful pieces. The
> sequence that the "Chairman's Waltz" underscores is beautifully
> fitting and adds an element that was not there before and, honestly, one I
> never would have imagined the scene having in the first place.

> Someone earlier compared this score to Crouching Tiger and to The Last
> Samauri and those scores and Geisha are so different. The manner in which
> Williams not only accompanies the film, but also uplifts it is what
> seperates it from other Eastern scores. The skilled use of sync points
> throughout the entire film are remarkable and I'd almost forgotten they
> are his hallmark. On the MIB II Dvd Danny Elfman talks about using sync
> points in a movie because "that's how he writes" but his are
> incredibly clumsy compared to Williams' masterful display in Geisha.

> In short, this score is a wonderful breath of fresh air that Williams
> continues to give us in the 21st century. From his new sounds in A.I. to
> the gray shades of Minority Report to the jazzy Catch Me If You Can to the
> wonderful Terminal, he has continued to re-invent himself and this year he
> should walk home with Oscar. Plus, he's done something the Academy loves
> -- written great music in an ethnic genre! Bravo, Maestro.

just great score:D =

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