SUPPORT FILMTRACKS! CLICK HERE FIRST:
Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk
iTunes (U.S.)
Amazon.ca
Amazon.fr
eBay (U.S.)
Amazon.de
Amazon.es
Half.com
Glisten Effect
Editorial Reviews
Scoreboard Forum
Viewer Ratings
Composers
Awards
   NEWEST MAJOR REVIEWS:
     1. Incredibles 2
    2. Solo: A Star Wars Story
   3. Deadpool 2
  4. Avengers: Infinity War
 5. A Quiet Place
6. Ready Player One
   CURRENT MOST POPULAR REVIEWS:
         1. Star Wars: The Last Jedi
        2. Gladiator
       3. Blade Runner 2049
      4. Batman
     5. Thor: Ragnarok
    6. The Avengers
   7. Spider-Man: Homecoming
  8. Avatar
 9. Dunkirk
10. Phantom Thread
Home Page
Menu Options ▼
Comments about the soundtrack for Minority Report (John Williams)
If you want to read something interesting, come here.

Levente Benedek
<Send E-Mail>
(line-127-221.dial.matav.net)


  Responses to this Comment:
Roman Dlouhý
Tomek
ugly joe
If you want to read something interesting, come here.   Sunday, October 6, 2002 (12:30 p.m.) 

The opening part of the sound track by John Williams echoes that of Vangelis' score in Blade Runner (1982), with the booming noises and a black screen, before the opening scene fades in.
If Williams uses the same motif from Blade Runner, than so does the screnwriter:
References to Blade Runner (1982), also based on a written work by author Philip K. Dick.
Both films begin with an extreme close-up shot of an open eye, and repeat the eye motif throughout.
Rutger Hauer's character (in Blade Runner) visits the genetic engineer who created his artificial eyes, Tom Cruise's character visits the surgeon who replaces his eyes.
Both films feature detectives making a key discovery by spotting a woman reflected in the mirror in the background of a crime-scene image that they are looking at.
Several times, bright shafts of light pour in through the windows behind the characters as they talk; this effect was used extensively in the earlier film.
After Cruise's encounter with Crowe, he drives with Agatha through a gorgeous green scenery, and tells her they're going "Someplace safe", a scene which parallels the ending scene of Blade Runner (the original, not the Director's Cut version.

During the scenes that show Anderton manipulating the PreCogs' visions of future crimes, the music in the background is Schubert's Symphony #8 in B Minor -- more commonly known as the "Unfinished" symphony.



Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


Roman Dlouhý
<Send E-Mail>
(ns.rb.cz)

  In Response to:
Levente Benedek
Heads up! The post above is a staggering SPOILER! *NM*   Wednesday, October 9, 2002 (1:10 a.m.) 



Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


Tomek
<Send E-Mail>
(w3cache.po.punkt.pl)

  In Response to:
Levente Benedek
Re: If you want to read something interesting, come here.   Wednesday, October 9, 2002 (5:06 p.m.) 

Firstly, I only saw the movie, the score in the film didn't convince me so I'm not going to buy it in the close future (my principle is: "if I didn't enjoy the score as heard in the film don't hurry up with buying it" ), considering that Williams is my favorite and beloved number 1 composer for years I was simply dissapointed by the score and less by the film.But You talking here about "Blade Runner", one of my very best movies so...

> The opening part of the sound track by John Williams echoes that of
> Vangelis' score in Blade Runner (1982), with the booming noises and a
> black screen, before the opening scene fades in.

That's truth. Vangelis' opening title music sounded not from this world. Just simply synths, but has some power...

If Williams uses the
> same motif from Blade Runner, than so does the screnwriter:
References
> to Blade Runner (1982), also based on a written work by author Philip K.
> Dick.
Both films begin with an extreme close-up shot of an open eye,
> and repeat the eye motif throughout.

Yes, and the close-up shot in BR came trough the history of cinema already

Rutger Hauer's character (in
> Blade Runner) visits the genetic engineer who created his artificial eyes,> Tom Cruise's character visits the surgeon who replaces his eyes.

The diffrence is that in BR it was a Japanese, in MR it is Swedish (Peter Stormare, who originaly is Swedish)

Both
> films feature detectives making a key discovery by spotting a woman
> reflected in the mirror in the background of a crime-scene image that they
> are looking at.

Yes!Good observation! But the techniques are quite different. Cruise uses a 3-D some kind of a virtual screen ( I was rather overhelmed by all those virtual advertisements and other stuff in the film) and in Blade Runner Ford uses some fantastic photo-device, which stimulated our imagination lot better.

Several times, bright shafts of light pour in through
> the windows behind the characters as they talk; this effect was used
> extensively in the earlier film.

This was one of the things that made Blade Runner so unique and "atmospheric", but I must admit that Janusz Kamiński's cinematography in MR is also brilliant (as always)

After Cruise's encounter with Crowe,
> he drives with Agatha through a gorgeous green scenery, and tells her
> they're going "Someplace safe", a scene which parallels the
> ending scene of Blade Runner (the original, not the Director's Cut
> version.

The difference is that they went by car and in BR they went by train

Finally my short conclusion is that with even all those similarities MR is a solid s-f extravaganza but IMHO will never reach the level of masterpiece which BR is (and yes,the Director's Cut is even better!) . Interesingly the A.I. which was a project of a late Kubrick made by Spielberg to almost masterpiece of s-f IMHO, I (and not only me I suppose) find there also couple references to Kubrick's old films. Additionaly Williams' score in A.I. was heart-breaking and simply awesome in compare to what he did in MR

Regards

Tomek

Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


ugly joe
(cliente-217216065178.cm128.senpd.
supercable.es)

  In Response to:
Levente Benedek

  Responses to this Comment:
Roman Dlouhý
Paul Andrew MacLean
Luis L.
GreetingsEarthling
Blade Runner vs Minority Report   Friday, October 11, 2002 (11:43 a.m.) 

Hi, Levente
how are you doing?
I've just read your interesting mail and I'd just like to add a few personal impressions. Certainly, there are some similarities between these two films, but don't let them confuse us. Blade Runner is a masterpiece, a jewel, whereas Minority Report is a good film, yeah, maybe one of the best Spielberg films in years, but that's all. Spielberg's film will never equal Bladerunner.
And this applies as well to music. No matter how much Williams tries to echo Vangelis' superb score, William's music is crap. Noisy, stupid, it lacks originality, beauty, it once again proves what I've been saying for such a long time: JOHN WILLIAMS HAS RUN OUT OF IDEAS, HE HAS NOTHING NEW TO OFFER, AND HIS MUSIC IS QUITE MEDIOCRE. Obviously, I won't go on comparing Vangelis with Williams, because Vangelis is a genius, wheras Williams is not. All you have to do is compare the discography of both musicians. If all Williams' recordings sound the same, Vangelis has made Jazz, avant-garde, rock, progressve, orchestral, new age, futuristic, soundtracks... and with excellent results most of the times.
Williams... please, go home
ugly joe


Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


Roman Dlouhý
<Send E-Mail>
(ns.rb.cz)

  In Response to:
ugly joe

  Responses to this Comment:
Pawel Stroinski
MSM
Roman Dlouhý
Re: The Day I got "1492" I knew I'd conquered Paradise!   Tuesday, October 15, 2002 (1:22 a.m.) 

Hadn't it been for some select Vangelis' works, I would have always lived in lies, suppositions and affectations. I mean until I listened to "El Greco", "Mythodea", "Oceanic", "Albedo", "1492", "L'Apocalypse Des Animaux" and of-spoken "Blade Runner", I'd assumed I could have told between good, mediocre and dross. But I had been mistaken. Vangelis opened my eyes and made me understand music in its nuts-and-bolts level.
If I want to listen to some real great jazz that even Jimmy Scott wouldn't pull off had he lived twice as long, I'm putting unmistakable "L'Apocalypse Des Animaux" on play, when it gets dark outside my window so my frame of mind inspires me to listen to some thematically abundant, compositionally rich work, I hurry to load "El Greco" in. And when all the tries to satiate my thirst for real classic music spiced with some opera vocals have failed after countless CDs with music of some (help me with spelling) composers like Wagner, Dvorák, Tchaikovsky, I recall I've recently bought "Mythodea" and suddenly after first few notes I start feeling the way only Vangelis can make me feel.
Tell me, ugly joe, to whom do I owe my thanks for Vangelis' splendidness? Please, ugly joe, don't waste your and our time talking about guys like Williams. He's nothing compared to Vangelis, the musical Son of God. I regret I don't have enough means to complete my Vangelis collection. And once I've topped it off, I will trash out all the trash I'd been buying till I found HIM!

Y L

Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


Pawel Stroinski
<Send E-Mail>
(pc31.pi.tpsa.pl)
Profile Picture
  In Response to:
Roman Dlouhý

  Responses to this Comment:
CS^TBL
Re: The Day I got "1492" I knew I'd conquered Paradise!   Friday, October 18, 2002 (8:05 a.m.) 

> Hadn't it been for some select Vangelis' works, I would have always lived
> in lies, suppositions and affectations. I mean until I listened to
> "El Greco", "Mythodea", "Oceanic",
> "Albedo", "1492", "L'Apocalypse Des Animaux"
> and of-spoken "Blade Runner", I'd assumed I could have told
> between good, mediocre and dross. But I had been mistaken. Vangelis opened
> my eyes and made me understand music in its nuts-and-bolts level.
If I
> want to listen to some real great jazz that even Jimmy Scott wouldn't pull
> off had he lived twice as long, I'm putting unmistakable
> "L'Apocalypse Des Animaux" on play, when it gets dark outside my
> window so my frame of mind inspires me to listen to some thematically
> abundant, compositionally rich work, I hurry to load "El Greco"
> in. And when all the tries to satiate my thirst for real classic music
> spiced with some opera vocals have failed after countless CDs with music
> of some (help me with spelling) composers like Wagner, Dvorák,
> Tchaikovsky, I recall I've recently bought "Mythodea" and
> suddenly after first few notes I start feeling the way only Vangelis can
> make me feel.
Tell me, ugly joe, to whom do I owe my thanks for
> Vangelis' splendidness? Please, ugly joe, don't waste your and our time
> talking about guys like Williams. He's nothing compared to Vangelis, the
> musical Son of God. I regret I don't have enough means to complete my
> Vangelis collection. And once I've topped it off, I will trash out all the
> trash I'd been buying till I found HIM!

> Y L

Will you throw out ALL Williams work?

And Gladiator?

Pawel


Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


CS^TBL
<Send E-Mail>
(hmm-dca-ap02-d05-178.dial.freesur
f.nl)

  In Response to:
Pawel Stroinski
Re: The Day I got "1492" I knew I'd conquered Paradise!   Saturday, November 2, 2002 (2:27 p.m.) 

You can't compare the music from bladerunner with MinRep. You can't even compare the movies themself. While MR probably is a realistic view of the future, Bladerunner is a spooky/lonely/mysterious view of the future. The same story for the music, being a fan of both Williams and Vangelis, I'd say that Vangelis's music for blader *is* spooky/lonely/mysterious. Bladerunner is one of those movies where the music is 1:1 with the movie. When I went to the cinema to watch MR, I expected more, based on the art-concepts on the MR website. In the end I have to conclude that the story of MR could have been played today.. it's imo a today-story, playing in the future, while Bladerunner is a future-story playing in the far future.. compared to MR, I'd place Bladerunner somewhere in 2315 orso

The music of Vangelis is played on synthesizers which you can't just give a place on the timeline of life.. ok, it's what was possible on synths in 1981/1982.. but still today the music sounds like the future.. that's because it isn't orchestral.. (which sounds 'familiar' to us, which makes it sound like 'today') Vangelis' music contains those weird beeps, slide-downs, big booms, an emotional minimalistic sounding rhodes, all elements which suits a future movie very well..

I'd say that Williams is briliant, but that both Spielberg and Williams should do what they do best.. which is basicly, nearly everything they did before A.I.
And about Vangelis, he does what he does.. and he does that very well.. if you ever need futuristic music for a futuristic movie like Bladerunner.. hire Vangelis.. guaranteed succes.


Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


MSM
(onw117pc15.farmedu.rug.nl)

  In Response to:
Roman Dlouhý
Vangelis' music has it's technical bouderies.   Friday, October 25, 2002 (3:29 a.m.) 

I think you guys are somewhat exaggerating. Williams' music is music-technically spoken, and often also emotionally, by far Vangelis' superior. Think of Hook, Schindler's List, Superman, Witches of Eastwick, Empire of the Sun, Seven Years in Tibet. Those are scores Vangelis could have never written. On the other hand, Williams CAN write Vangelis like music which is emotionally even stronger than much of Vangelis' own works (I think of Jurassic Park).
Don't get me wrong, I am certainly a fan of Vangelis, but he's no match for Williams (in his Golden Years). By the way, I think Vangelis' March With Me is one of the best pieces of music ever written in the history of mankind.

Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


Roman Dlouhý
<Send E-Mail>
(ns.rb.cz)

  In Response to:
Roman Dlouhý
Deeply sorry about any caused misapprehension...!   Monday, November 11, 2002 (12:44 a.m.) 

Guys, I was being ironical in the post you replied to! I can't abide Vangelis' music a way beyond any conceivable utterance. Doesn't it glance out from what's written between the lines?

Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


Paul Andrew MacLean
<Send E-Mail>
(142.syracuse-01rh16rt.ny.dial-acc
ess.att.net)

  In Response to:
ugly joe

  Responses to this Comment:
Concrete
Re: Blade Runner vs Minority Report   Tuesday, October 15, 2002 (4:40 p.m.) 

> Vangelis is a genius, wheras Williams is
> not.

I haven't yet heard Minority Report, so I cannot defend it. I am however a BIG fan of *both* John Williams and Vangelis Papathanassiou, and I would personally defend Williams as the more acomplished musician.

John Williams is a classically trained composer, arranger, conductor and concert pianist, a graduate of the Julliart School of Music and influenced primarily by the classical and jazz traditions. Vangelis is self-taught, admits he unable to read music, and is largely influenced by Greek and other ethnic music, sometimes church music, and his roots in rock and roll (from his tenure as keyborist for the bands Formix, and later Aphrodite's child).

>All you have to do is compare the discography of both musicians. If
> all Williams' recordings sound the same, Vangelis has made Jazz,

So has Williams. In the 50s, before he ever scored a film, Williams was well-known as a jazz pianist and arranger.

> avant-garde,

Check-out Williams' highly avant garde, Takemitsu-flavoured score for Images. Sample also his cue "The Abduction of Barry" from Close Encounters. Certainly these are as avant garde as "Beaubourg" and "Invisible Connections".

>rock, progressve,

Williams is not much of a rocker I confess. But speaking as someone who hates rock anyway, to me that's not much of a loss!

> orchestral,

Vangelis' one (and only) orchestral work, "Mythodea", was composed with the help of arranger Blake Neely. Williams can write for orchestra without the aid of an arranger. Williams does use an orchestrator to save time in the rush to complete a film score (but his sketches are essentially complete) and Williams' concert works are penned by him alone.

> new age, futuristic,

Williams has also done a fair amount of electronic work himself (the final scene in The Witches of Eastwick is all synthesized, while Heartbeeps makes extensive use of electronics). In fact I would say Williams is really the more versatile composer.

"Fururistic" is not what one can call a musical genre. However, if one is talking about what type of music tends to be associated with "furturistic" it would probably be John Williams (ever hear of Star Wars?).

> soundtracks... and with excellent results most of the times.

No argument here. Blade Runner, The Bounty, 1492 are all stellar works.

Being classically trained does not make one a better composer necessarily (if I were making a movie I'd probably hire Vangelis before I'd hire, say, Bill Conti) but Williams is *the* most sought-after composer in the film business. This is not only because his scores are popular, but because his music lifts and elivates a movie in a way few other composers can. Williams stature amoung other musicians is proven by the way people like Itzahk Perlman, Yo-Yo Ma, Christopher Parkening, Stomu Yamash'ta, The Chieftains, etc. have been eager to perform on Williams soundttracks.

And I think it would fair to say that Williams would have been more than capable of writing effective scores for Blade Runner, The Bounty and 1492, but I doubt very much that Vangelis could have as effectively served Superman or Raiders.

Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


Concrete
<Send E-Mail>
(cache2-bagu.server.ntli.net)

  In Response to:
Paul Andrew MacLean
Re: Blade Runner vs Minority Report   Friday, January 23, 2004 (7:40 p.m.) 

For me Vangelis is unique
A True artist who relies on instinct and isn't constrained by technique (perhaps only by what he can use to produce sound)

There will be another John williams. if you look closely at his music there are common threads throughout such as the influence of Stravinsky copland, or Holst. Vangelis seems to take different directions each time capturing the essense of sound and emotion.

I do think both are superb musicians but i believe that 200-300 years from Vangelis's music will still be here.

Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


Luis L.
(24-90-185-231.nyc.rr.com)

  In Response to:
ugly joe
Re: Blade Runner vs Minority Report   Monday, January 13, 2003 (10:55 a.m.) 

> Hi, Levente
how are you doing?
I've just read your interesting
> mail and I'd just like to add a few personal impressions. Certainly, there
> are some similarities between these two films, but don't let them confuse
> us. Blade Runner is a masterpiece, a jewel, whereas Minority Report is a
> good film, yeah, maybe one of the best Spielberg films in years, but
> that's all. Spielberg's film will never equal Bladerunner.
And this
> applies as well to music. No matter how much Williams tries to echo
> Vangelis' superb score, William's music is crap. Noisy, stupid, it lacks
> originality, beauty, it once again proves what I've been saying for such a
> long time: JOHN WILLIAMS HAS RUN OUT OF IDEAS, HE HAS NOTHING NEW TO
> OFFER, AND HIS MUSIC IS QUITE MEDIOCRE. Obviously, I won't go on comparing
> Vangelis with Williams, because Vangelis is a genius, wheras Williams is
> not. All you have to do is compare the discography of both musicians. If
> all Williams' recordings sound the same, Vangelis has made Jazz,
> avant-garde, rock, progressve, orchestral, new age, futuristic,
> soundtracks... and with excellent results most of the times.
>
Williams... please, go home
ugly joe

Give Minority Report 20 years of reflection and you would probably say the same things about it as you have said about Blade Runner.

Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


GreetingsEarthling
<Send E-Mail>
(va-loudon-68-67-234-254.chvlva.ad
elphia.net)

  In Response to:
ugly joe

  Responses to this Comment:
music fan
Re: Blade Runner vs Minority Report   Tuesday, March 23, 2004 (10:18 p.m.) 

> Hi, Levente
how are you doing?
I've just read your interesting
> mail and I'd just like to add a few personal impressions. Certainly, there
> are some similarities between these two films, but don't let them confuse
> us. Blade Runner is a masterpiece, a jewel, whereas Minority Report is a
> good film, yeah, maybe one of the best Spielberg films in years, but
> that's all. Spielberg's film will never equal Bladerunner.
And this
> applies as well to music. No matter how much Williams tries to echo
> Vangelis' superb score, William's music is crap. Noisy, stupid, it lacks
> originality, beauty, it once again proves what I've been saying for such a
> long time: JOHN WILLIAMS HAS RUN OUT OF IDEAS, HE HAS NOTHING NEW TO
> OFFER, AND HIS MUSIC IS QUITE MEDIOCRE. Obviously, I won't go on comparing
> Vangelis with Williams, because Vangelis is a genius, wheras Williams is
> not. All you have to do is compare the discography of both musicians. If
> all Williams' recordings sound the same, Vangelis has made Jazz,
> avant-garde, rock, progressve, orchestral, new age, futuristic,
> soundtracks... and with excellent results most of the times.
>
Williams... please, go home
ugly joe

John Williams and Vangelis are not easily compared, for their geniuses go in different directions. Williams writes technically masterful works, and sometimes manages emotional grandeur (personally, his Duel of the Fates ranks as the single best piece of film music ever written in my opinion.) Vangelis has little or no technical skill, but paints an emotional soundscape of unrivaled intensity and color. Just because one of the approaches appeals more strongly to you, based on your prejudices, do not dismiss the worth of the other approach. If a composer might achieve both, that would be the best, agreed?


Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


music fan
<Send E-Mail>
(202-177-160-157.sify.net)

  In Response to:
GreetingsEarthling
all of you guys are totally crazy!!!   Tuesday, January 17, 2006 (3:33 a.m.) 

I personally think that all of you guys must have flipped!!!All of music is the same notes being recycled in a different way! i am not a big fan of John Williams or Vangelis(I also listen to a lot of classical stuff-Beethoven, Haydn, Mozart etc..),but i think that both of them are accomplished composers.Yeah, Vangelis cannot beat Williams on his solid classical and orchestral grounding, but then Williams cannot beat Vangelis on his electronica musical simplicity! This kind of argument is slightly similar to the one about who is superior: Bach or Beethoven? BOTH of them are good, though they have their flaws.When comparisons become stale, stop the thread!!!!:)

Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display



Copyright © 1998-2018, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast,
rewritten or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. Scoreboard created 7/24/98 and last updated 4/25/15.