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John Williams Themes

Stefancos
<Send E-Mail>
(84-105-105-237.cable.quicknet.nl)


  Responses to this Comment:
Jon Allen
John Williams Themes   Saturday, July 28, 2007 (3:42 p.m.) 

Why is everyone, including this reviewer so bothered about Doyle and Hooper not relying on the themes Williams created for his first Potter score when Williams himseld largely abondoned them when his did Prisoner of Azkaban?

Outside of Hedwig's Theme, he did not state a single old theme except in the End Credits.



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Jon Allen
(c-24-125-111-202.hsd1.va.comcast.
net)

  In Response to:
Stefancos

  Responses to this Comment:
Stefancos
Zephos
Re: John Williams Themes   Wednesday, August 1, 2007 (11:14 a.m.) 

> Why is everyone, including this reviewer so bothered about Doyle and
> Hooper not relying on the themes Williams created for his first Potter
> score when Williams himseld largely abondoned them when his did Prisoner
> of Azkaban?

> Outside of Hedwig's Theme, he did not state a single old theme except in
> the End Credits.

That was not John Williams' doing. It was director Alfonso Cauron who told Williams' to abandon his old themes because the themes wouldn't match the new dark tone. I'm sure if Cauron hadn't made this decision Williams' would have been glad to bring back some old themes. But we have to remember, the director has the final say. Same thing goes for Hooper and Doyle.

(Message edited on Wednesday, August 1, 2007, at 11:16 a.m.)


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Stefancos
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(84-105-105-237.cable.quicknet.nl)

  In Response to:
Jon Allen
Re: John Williams Themes   Wednesday, August 1, 2007 (1:36 p.m.) 

Actually, I seriously doubt it. The only reason why so many themes and underscore were re-used in Chamber Of Secrets is because of the very tight schedile and because William Ross was hired to do not adapting work for it.

Generally Williams does not regurgitate that many themes in his sequel scores.

He really only did for Star Wars and Home Alone II.
The Lost World was completely different, the Indiana Jones scores have completely different themes outside of the Raiders March, even Jaws II only used the Shark motif and a very small cameo for 2 other themes.

I think as an incredibly creative person John Williams would rather come up with new themes, a new aproach then just redo what he has already done.

> That was not John Williams' doing. It was director Alfonso Cauron who told
> Williams' to abandon his old themes because the themes wouldn't match the
> new dark tone. I'm sure if Cauron hadn't made this decision Williams'
> would have been glad to bring back some old themes. But we have to
> remember, the director has the final say. Same thing goes for Hooper and
> Doyle.



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Zephos
(francis.ormond.unimelb.edu.au)

  In Response to:
Jon Allen
Re: John Williams Themes   Monday, August 13, 2007 (3:59 a.m.) 

> That was not John Williams' doing. It was director Alfonso Cauron who told
> Williams' to abandon his old themes because the themes wouldn't match the
> new dark tone. I'm sure if Cauron hadn't made this decision Williams'
> would have been glad to bring back some old themes. But we have to
> remember, the director has the final say. Same thing goes for Hooper and
> Doyle.

How do you know this?

It's far more likely Williams decided a fresh approach would work for the film. After all, none of the previous themes would have suited style and half of them were for characters that didn't even appear in the third film.
We really can't know anything about what he would have written if he'd been presented with a different film. And that's what should be at argument here: the films themselves. They are where the music makes sense; thematic continuity be damned.



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