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Oh, come on now

J
(adsl-066-156-081-221.sip.asm.bell
south.net)


  Responses to this Comment:
David
Narendur
C. Hook
Oh, come on now   Tuesday, July 4, 2006 (5:30 p.m.) 

Get with the times! Just because you don't like the 'modern' sound as you spend 1000 words delving into, it doesn't mean that it doesn't work. Scores like the Rock, the first Pirates of the Caribbean, Crimson Tide, etc. They work for me - and I collect film scores.

So how about you focus more on your retirement plans since it seems like you're about ready to reach that magical age of 65 with how anal you sound.

Can't filmtracks find someone who will review this score openly without first opening up with a long monologue on why they hate modern scores and that traditional scores are better?

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David
(azwp03-o.wellsfargo.com)
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  In Response to:
J

  Responses to this Comment:
Jon
Jay
Re: Oh, come on now   Tuesday, July 4, 2006 (7:06 p.m.) 

He isn't being anal about the music being composed in a modern method. He's merely stating that it's generic...which it is. Extremely. Do you honestly feel that this music fits the 17th century setting of the film? That's the real problem: the music just doesn't fit or enhance what's happening on screen. The score fails in its one and only job.

His comparison of this score to countless other Bruckheimer film scores done by Zimmer and his cronies is spot-on. This score could be cut-and-pasted into any other Bruckheimer action/military/crime-drama/spy/adventure film and not miss a beat. Zimmer's self-plagiarism has become a joke.


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Jon
(adsl-066-156-081-221.sip.asm.bell
south.net)

  In Response to:
David

  Responses to this Comment:
Pieter
Joon
Re: Oh, come on now   Tuesday, July 4, 2006 (8:31 p.m.) 

> He isn't being anal about the music being composed in a modern method.
> He's merely stating that it's generic...which it is. Extremely. Do you
> honestly feel that this music fits the 17th century setting of the film?
> That's the real problem: the music just doesn't fit or enhance what's
> happening on screen. The score fails in its one and only job.

> His comparison of this score to countless other Bruckheimer film scores
> done by Zimmer and his cronies is spot-on. This score could be
> cut-and-pasted into any other Bruckheimer
> action/military/crime-drama/spy/adventure film and not miss a beat.
> Zimmer's self-plagiarism has become a joke.

Lets look at the film again. This is a film that is based on a DISNEY RIDE. I don't think the music should have the soundings of a 17th century setting, as that would set the wrong tone for the movie. The movie is a popcorn flick, a blockbuster that deserves an energetic score that is fun and not completely true to the timeframe but the intent of the characters. The characters aren't going for an accurate portrayal, they're representing characters with that 'Disney' charm. In that sense, I think this score works for the movie. Maybe you should look at the point of the movie again, and realize that you want a score to turn the movie into something it is not.

And so you're saying that this score (not pieces - the whole score) would work for Pearl Harbor? I think that would set a wrong tone there. Oh lets not forget him producing Top Gun - I think it would work there too. No, it would again be the wrong tone. Violins playing during take off?

Quit the stereotypes! Zimmer does scores we've heard before, but so have other composers such as Horner, Goldsmith, and many more. If it works - then that is what needed. They don't need to recreate the genre every movie

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Pieter
(ip503caf22.speed.planet.nl)

  In Response to:
Jon
Re: Oh, come on now   Wednesday, July 5, 2006 (4:55 a.m.) 

> Lets look at the film again. This is a film that is based on a DISNEY
> RIDE.
The music from the ride actually does sound period and piratey.

> I don't think the music should have the soundings of a 17th century
> setting, as that would set the wrong tone for the movie.
That would set the WRONG tone? So having music that very much fits with the timeframe sets a wrong tone. "That's interesting...", Captain Jack Sparrow

> The movie is a popcorn flick, a blockbuster that deserves an energetic score that is fun
I would highly urge you to listen to Cutthroat Island. It does sound piratey and period and uses only real orchestra and real choir. However, it sounds more fun and energetic than PotC. Although I admit PotC is fun and energetic, it's not quality fun and energetic. Cutthroat Island is one obvious example of a score that has a very high quality, but also a very high fun factor. And the amount of energy in the music to Cutthroat Island is almost ridiculous.

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Joon
<Send E-Mail>
(71-37-23-110.tukw.qwest.net)

  In Response to:
Jon
Re: Oh, come on now   Sunday, September 24, 2006 (10:14 a.m.) 

> Quit the stereotypes! Zimmer does scores we've heard before, but so have
> other composers such as Horner, Goldsmith, and many more. If it works -
> then that is what needed. They don't need to recreate the genre every
> movie

Clemmenson has criticized other composers (namely James Horner) for self-plagarization as well.


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Jay
<Send E-Mail>
(42323140.innernet.net)

  In Response to:
David
Re: Oh, come on now   Friday, August 4, 2006 (8:17 a.m.) 

> He isn't being anal about the music being composed in a modern method.
> He's merely stating that it's generic...which it is. Extremely. Do you
> honestly feel that this music fits the 17th century setting of the film?
> That's the real problem: the music just doesn't fit or enhance what's
> happening on screen. The score fails in its one and only job.

> His comparison of this score to countless other Bruckheimer film scores
> done by Zimmer and his cronies is spot-on. This score could be
> cut-and-pasted into any other Bruckheimer
> action/military/crime-drama/spy/adventure film and not miss a beat.
> Zimmer's self-plagiarism has become a joke.

Oh, and James Horner's hasn't?


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Narendur
(p85.212.158.237.tisdip.tiscali.de)
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  In Response to:
J
Re: Oh, come on now   Wednesday, July 5, 2006 (8:23 a.m.) 

> Can't filmtracks find someone who will review this score openly without
> first opening up with a long monologue on why they hate modern scores and
> that traditional scores are better?

Earth to Genius: Filmtracks is a one-man operation, so who else should review it? You could do it, but I don't think you're willing or able to do that.

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C. Hook
(200.122.153.46)
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  In Response to:
J
Re: Oh, come on now   Wednesday, July 5, 2006 (8:20 p.m.) 

> Get with the times! Just because you don't like the 'modern' sound as you
> spend 1000 words delving into, it doesn't mean that it doesn't work.
> Scores like the Rock, the first Pirates of the Caribbean, Crimson Tide,
> etc. They work for me - and I collect film scores.

The Rock got four stars and Crimson Tide got five on this website. Your argument, which we will call "Jack", has finally come out of your anus.

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