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Comments about the soundtrack for The Hunt for Red October (Basil Poledouris)
English or Russian

Jennifer
<Send E-Mail>
(bdsl.66.14.183.229.gte.net)


  Responses to this Comment:
Chris
Dylan Clements
Tony
English or Russian   Saturday, November 15, 2003 (9:43 p.m.) 

I noticed that at the beginning of the movie those aboard the Red October are speaking in Russian. A few moments later they are speaking in English. Is this switch for the benefit of the English audience? I don't know if this question makes sense but... When I hear the Russians aboard the Red October speak in English are they actually speaking in Russian? It does not make sense to me that the Russian crew members speak English. I would appreciate anyones input.

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Chris
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(dialup-67.75.98.135.Dial1.Stamfor
d1.Level3.net)

  In Response to:
Jennifer

  Responses to this Comment:
F&AM
Re: English or Russian   Thursday, November 27, 2003 (8:06 a.m.) 

> I noticed that at the beginning of the movie those aboard the Red October
> are speaking in Russian. A few moments later they are speaking in English.
> Is this switch for the benefit of the English audience? I don't know if
> this question makes sense but... When I hear the Russians aboard the Red
> October speak in English are they actually speaking in Russian? It does
> not make sense to me that the Russian crew members speak English. I would
> appreciate anyones input.

Its to benift the English audience. Yes, when they do speak English they are really speaking Russian.


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F&AM
(1cust55.tnt24.sjc4.da.uu.net)

  In Response to:
Chris

  Responses to this Comment:
Chris
Daz
Richard Curtis
Re: English or Russian   Friday, January 2, 2004 (5:40 a.m.) 

> Its to benift the English audience. Yes, when they do speak English they
> are really speaking Russian.

I honestly do not know where you are getting this from. The movie is an english production, the crew is not real soviets...though many may be native speakers of the language.

When the transition was made it was total for the whole movie, that is, no dubbing.

In fact, all the officers, such as the navigations officer, not just Sam Niel and Sean Conery...were Americans.

Or at the very least, spoke good english.

If those scenes were filmed entirely for the benefit of Russians, than it would have all been filmed in russian, and the English dubbed over it. Or such.

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Chris
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  In Response to:
F&AM
Re: English or Russian   Friday, January 9, 2004 (6:44 p.m.) 

Thats right, thats what i ment.


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Daz
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entralplus.com)

  In Response to:
F&AM
Re: English or Russian   Friday, March 18, 2005 (4:26 p.m.) 

> I honestly do not know where you are getting this from. The movie is an
> english production, the crew is not real soviets...though many may be
> native speakers of the language.

> When the transition was made it was total for the whole movie, that is, no
> dubbing.

> In fact, all the officers, such as the navigations officer, not just Sam
> Niel and Sean Conery...were Americans.

> Or at the very least, spoke good english.

> If those scenes were filmed entirely for the benefit of Russians, than it
> would have all been filmed in russian, and the English dubbed over it. Or
> such.

Not to put my head in the lions mouth but Sam Neill was actually born in Ireland and spent most of his life in Austrailia and England.
Sean Connery is an extremely famous SCOTTISH actor
Peter Firth (who played the political officer) is also a famous ENGLISH actor!
Tim Curry is also a famous ENGLISH actor.

So in fact most of the leading cast are not American at all!



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Richard Curtis
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k)

  In Response to:
F&AM
Re: English or Russian   Saturday, August 5, 2006 (4:19 p.m.) 

> I honestly do not know where you are getting this from. The movie is an
> english production, the crew is not real soviets...though many may be
> native speakers of the language.

> When the transition was made it was total for the whole movie, that is, no
> dubbing.

> If those scenes were filmed entirely for the benefit of Russians, than it
> would have all been filmed in russian, and the English dubbed over it. Or
> such.

I'm not sure you understand the question - as I read it, the initial quesiton concerns the Russians on Red October (but also on the Konavolev and in the Red Fleet Political Directorate).

At the start of the film, Ramius and Borodin are observed speaking in Russian, with English subtitles. This would make for a very tedious movie - every Russian character actually speaking in Russian the whole way through and us having to read subtitles.

So, in order to make it easier for the English language audience, we get the scene where Putin is reading from the book, and we magically change languages.
From then on, the Russian characters are speaking English, but we know it is supposed to be 'Russian'. At the end of the film, we do hear real Russian again to, as a previous poster said, allow Ryan to speak Russian and Ramius to speak English. The rest of the film is apparently conducted in English (ie. the officers of the Red October can all speak English and recieve orders comfortably from Mancuso).This last fact, of course, is not true for the Konavolev where they are still speaking 'Russian'.

To put it another way... compare the Babel Fish in The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy (recent release) - once it is in Arthur Dent's head, he hears the Vogons' speech as English, but we believe they are speaking 'Vogon'.

This follows the way Clancy writes his book - once we know which character we are reading about, we know they are sepaking in their native tongue (something he often reinforces with use of particular words and phrases from the characters' language), but naturally all dialogue is printed in english so we can read it.

Hope this helps!

Regards,
Richard

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Dylan Clements
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cbell.net)

  In Response to:
Jennifer
Re: English or Russian   Tuesday, February 17, 2004 (11:54 p.m.) 

> I noticed that at the beginning of the movie those aboard the Red October
> are speaking in Russian. A few moments later they are speaking in English.
> Is this switch for the benefit of the English audience? I don't know if
> this question makes sense but... When I hear the Russians aboard the Red
> October speak in English are they actually speaking in Russian? It does
> not make sense to me that the Russian crew members speak English. I would
> appreciate anyones input.

If you will recall the sequence, the russian political officer Ivan Putin (played by Peter Firth) is reading an excerpt from Ramius' copy of the book of Revelations:

(spoken in Russian, subtitled) "Behold, I come like a thief!...Then they gathered them... together in a place ... called"

(spoken in english) "Armageddon. And the seventh angel poured out his bowl into the air, and a voice cried out from heaven, saying, 'It is done!'"

Meanwhile the camera zooms in to a close up on the political officers mouth stopping at the name Armageddon and then returning to it's orignal view.

I remember thinking at the time that it was a rather elegant way of shedding the constant need for subtitles throughout the rest of the film. Of course they are speaking Russian; this was a Soviet Ballistic Missile submarine. However, given that it was a largely, if not entirely, an english speaking cast acting in a American production, adapted from a book written in English, and was being released to an English speaking audience, I don't think the decision to drop the subtitles was confusing.

As a interesting aside, when the Americans arrive on board the submarine, the Russians return to speaking Russian with subtitles, which allows Jack Ryan to explain that he speaks a little Russian and also allows Ramius to demonstrate that he speaks e\English. From that point on, the few Russian characters with lines are actually speaking English, which explains why the Americans can understand them. Remember that the Russians who remained on board, with one notable exception, were planning to defect to the United States, so it is reasonable to imagine that many of them would have learned to speak some English.

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Tony
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(pcp0010731885pcs.howard01.md.comc
ast.net)

  In Response to:
Jennifer
Re: English or Russian   Wednesday, May 4, 2005 (8:36 p.m.) 

> I noticed that at the beginning of the movie those aboard the Red October
> are speaking in Russian. A few moments later they are speaking in English.
> Is this switch for the benefit of the English audience? I don't know if
> this question makes sense but... When I hear the Russians aboard the Red
> October speak in English are they actually speaking in Russian? It does
> not make sense to me that the Russian crew members speak English. I would
> appreciate anyones input.

Yes, the answers have been provided, but what hasn't it what horrible Russian accents they have. I am a Russian linguist, and I can't say there has been a funnier accent than Connery's Conglomeration of Scottish/Irish, English, and Russian!


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