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Comments about the soundtrack for Van Helsing (Alan Silvestri)
It's Okay Nothing More

Mark
(pcp01155849pcs.newhav01.mi.comcas
t.net)


  Responses to this Comment:
Tomek
It's Okay Nothing More   Monday, April 26, 2004 (8:50 p.m.) 

I was looking foward to this score more than any other this year, and it was a total disappointment. The whole score seems generic and repetative. If you've heard the clips already, you've pretty much heard the most interesting parts of the score. There isn't anything else all to impressive. Well maybe a couple things, but not enough to recommend buying this CD. Maybe it's the choral usage because I'm really tried of choral use in scores. I would say **/*****

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Tomek
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  In Response to:
Mark

  Responses to this Comment:
Pogel Adler
Re: It's Okay Nothing More   Tuesday, April 27, 2004 (12:25 a.m.) 

> I was looking foward to this score more than any other this year, and it
> was a total disappointment. The whole score seems generic and repetative.
> If you've heard the clips already, you've pretty much heard the most
> interesting parts of the score. There isn't anything else all to
> impressive. Well maybe a couple things, but not enough to recommend buying
> this CD. Maybe it's the choral usage because I'm really tried of choral
> use in scores. I would say **/*****

You know, yesterday while listening to Debney's "The Passion" I also had the same conclusion, about the over-use of chorus in recent years, especially since everyone saw how really good adapt the chorus as Howard Shore showed in first "The Lord of the Rings" score. Don Davis did phenomenal job in "The Matrix Revolutions" especially, then came Debney and now Silvestri. It seems that everyone wants to utilize huge orchestra and huge chorus these days (Shore again in "ROTK", Beltrami in "Hellboy", Ottman in "X2" etc.). It's great, but it's slowly becoming tiresome, especially that IMHO chorus' role is to enhance the depth of music and orchestral music especially, not to lead the music. They (composers) probably listen too often to "Carmina Burana" these days...


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Pogel Adler
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  In Response to:
Tomek

  Responses to this Comment:
Pogel Adler
Tomek
Christian Kühn
LotR?!   Tuesday, April 27, 2004 (5:19 a.m.) 

I don't think the mediocre LOTR scores have chanced the listening experiences of NORMAL (not crazy LotR-fanboys) listeners or of the directors or of whoever.
The chorus makes sense in this score because it's pseudo-gothic style, it's as the movie is a stereotype.
Let's face it: LotR wasn't the big hit everyone claims it to be, film and music-wise. It's a part of pop-culture, but film and music wise it isn't better then the prequels (of StarWars).

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Pogel Adler
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  In Response to:
Pogel Adler

  Responses to this Comment:
Tomek
Christian Kühn
...continued   Tuesday, April 27, 2004 (5:43 a.m.) 

And talking of the latter: Episode 1 used a gigantic chorus and everybody loved it (there was even a music video). So if anything, THIS film would have been the starting-point of popular use of chorus in a major motion picture.
But I still think your "theory" is ridiculous and st*pid. No offence to you, though.

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Tomek
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  In Response to:
Pogel Adler

  Responses to this Comment:
Canamic
Re: ...continued   Wednesday, April 28, 2004 (12:57 a.m.) 

> And talking of the latter: Episode 1 used a gigantic chorus and everybody
> loved it (there was even a music video). So if anything, THIS film would
> have been the starting-point of popular use of chorus in a major motion
> picture.
But I still think your "theory" is ridiculous and
> st*pid. No offence to you, though.

It was not "theory", just a thought. It's great that composers these days want to use such massive chorus parts in their scores, but is every score really needs such approach? I agree that Williams' idea to use big chorus in Episode I was a great one and probably it was in some way a starting-point of popular use of chorus these days, but I'll say that Basil Poledouris move the imagination stronger some 20 years later when he used chorus in Conan the Barbarian score.

No offence taken

Tomek


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Canamic
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rter.com)

  In Response to:
Tomek

  Responses to this Comment:
Pogel Adler
Eric
Neo Rasa
Choirs aren't exactly new   Thursday, April 29, 2004 (7:20 p.m.) 

Where did you people get the idea that prominent choral parts in film music is a relatively new development? Many of the first Golden era film composers were highly influenced by European opera and orchestral works from people like R. Strauss, Wagner, and Mahler. So no, I think choirs in film music dates quite a bit before Goldsmith.

On another note, its downright silly to say there's too much choir in film music today. That's like saying your sick of the string section.

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Pogel Adler
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  In Response to:
Canamic

  Responses to this Comment:
JB
I totally agree *NM*   Friday, April 30, 2004 (6:26 a.m.) 



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JB
(e81-197-65-169.elisa-laajakaista.
fi)

  In Response to:
Pogel Adler
Curious...   Saturday, May 22, 2004 (3:57 a.m.) 

This is very curious. You seem to be agreeing, that choral music and film music that employ strings is getting overused. Yet, you gave me a thrashing for my experiment saying the complete opposite.

That is very contradictory. Make up your mind!!

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Eric
(d142-173-60-67.bchsia.telus.net)

  In Response to:
Canamic
Re: Choirs aren't exactly new   Friday, April 30, 2004 (6:37 p.m.) 

Now that you mention it, I *AM* getting pretty sick of the string section. They think they're so hot.

> Where did you people get the idea that prominent choral parts in film
> music is a relatively new development? Many of the first Golden era film
> composers were highly influenced by European opera and orchestral works
> from people like R. Strauss, Wagner, and Mahler. So no, I think choirs in
> film music dates quite a bit before Goldsmith.

> On another note, its downright silly to say there's too much choir in film
> music today. That's like saying your sick of the string section.


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Neo Rasa
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  In Response to:
Canamic
Re: Choirs aren't exactly new   Thursday, May 6, 2004 (5:39 a.m.) 

>On another note, its downright silly to say there's too much choir in film >music today.

Amen. I was actually reading this review thinking how great it is to see heavy choir usage again. Gorgeous as it is, I can only go back to Conan the Barbarian so many times a day.

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Christian Kühn
(2.vauban.fr.studentenwohnheim-bw.
de)
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  In Response to:
Pogel Adler
Re: ...continued   Wednesday, April 28, 2004 (12:02 p.m.) 

> And talking of the latter: Episode 1 used a gigantic chorus and everybody
> loved it (there was even a music video). So if anything, THIS film would
> have been the starting-point of popular use of chorus in a major motion
> picture.

That is incorrect...Jerry Goldsmith started the trend of using a chorus more frequently. Fact of the matter is that a chorus is a good fir for many sci-fi and/or fantasy films, and since we have quite a lot of them these days, hence we have quite a lot of choral scores.

CK

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Tomek
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  In Response to:
Pogel Adler

  Responses to this Comment:
Pogel Adler
Re: LotR?!   Wednesday, April 28, 2004 (12:46 a.m.) 

> I don't think the mediocre LOTR scores have chanced the listening
> experiences of NORMAL (not crazy LotR-fanboys) listeners or of the
> directors or of whoever.
The chorus makes sense in this score because
> it's pseudo-gothic style, it's as the movie is a stereotype.
Let's
> face it: LotR wasn't the big hit everyone claims it to be, film and
> music-wise. It's a part of pop-culture, but film and music wise it isn't
> better then the prequels (of StarWars).

It's Your subjective opinion about mediocrity of LOTR scores. And the chorus makes sense not because it's pseudo-gothic, but it's purpose is to enhance monumental visuals of the film and be representative of several races & beings in film (notice that chorus sings there in Mordor langauge, Elvish etc.). LOTR movies were enormous commercial successes (and in a way artistic too) but I agree with You that they haven't such magic as films like "Willow" or "The Neverending Story". It's a pop-culture, but what did You except? Were the Tolkien books aimed at sophisticated critics or massive population? Star Wars prequels looks poor in compare to LOTR trilogy, Lucas should never done them...


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Pogel Adler
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  In Response to:
Tomek
Re: LotR?!   Wednesday, April 28, 2004 (12:50 p.m.) 

The chorus makes sense in this score because
Let's

> It's Your subjective opinion about mediocrity of LOTR scores. And the
> chorus makes sense not because it's pseudo-gothic, but it's purpose is to
> enhance monumental visuals of the film and be representative of several
> races & beings in film (notice that chorus sings there in Mordor
> langauge, Elvish etc.). LOTR movies were enormous commercial successes
> (and in a way artistic too) but I agree with You that they haven't such
> magic as films like "Willow" or "The Neverending
> Story". It's a pop-culture, but what did You except? Were the Tolkien
> books aimed at sophisticated critics or massive population? Star Wars
> prequels looks poor in compare to LOTR trilogy, Lucas should never done
> them...

The prequels are pretty unnecessary. I would have expected less of a hype on, I'm sorry I have to say this again, pretty boring movies and mediocre scores
You are of course right about what you say. The "pseudo-gothic" comment was made on Van Helsing, though. Sorry if that wasn't clear. LotR of course needed the chorus, I would have been even more disappointed if Shore hadn't used any


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Christian Kühn
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de)
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  In Response to:
Pogel Adler

  Responses to this Comment:
Pogel Adler
Re: LotR?!   Wednesday, April 28, 2004 (11:59 a.m.) 

You do know that we Bavarians are the most brutal of all Germans? So I would advise to keep your mouth shut; your constant bitching about how medoicre LotR is is becoming very boring now.

Christian

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Pogel Adler
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  In Response to:
Christian Kühn
Re: LotR?!   Wednesday, April 28, 2004 (12:44 p.m.) 

As a proud Prussian, I of course give a crap about what you say
No seriously, your constant "bitching" about LotR being so "great" and all is much more annoying, I'm telling you!

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