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Comments about the soundtrack for WALL-E (Thomas Newman)
It's a film score, not an album

P.Kodes
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  Responses to this Comment:
berlioz
It's a film score, not an album   Tuesday, July 1, 2008 (7:23 p.m.) 

I think we need to stop this trend of reviewing film scores as standalone musical compositions.

WALL-E is a perfect score because it works well in the film, an inseparable part of it.

Every film score does not need a dominant melody to give it identity. The score has plenty of identity.

Every sentimental track does not need to have gushing emotive string melodies. Newman's soft music box conveys far more emotion in a smaller package.

I guess the problem is that Newman is a director's composer, not a filmtracks-reviewer's composer. Newman prefers to support a film and contribute to it rather than take over the film.

Considering all of this site's reviews of Newman's works, it seems that filmtracks' interest in Thomas Newman's film is correlated to how much it sounds like John Williams. Unfortunately, Newman is simply not the "loud blaring horn melodies" type, and prefers to support the film in a more subtle way.

In my opinion, as a score, this is the finest film score of the year.



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berlioz
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  In Response to:
P.Kodes

  Responses to this Comment:
Theowne
Abigailian
Re: It's a film score, not an album   Wednesday, July 2, 2008 (12:18 a.m.) 

> I think we need to stop this trend of reviewing film scores as standalone
> musical compositions.

> WALL-E is a perfect score because it works well in the film, an
> inseparable part of it.

Yet it is sold as a standalone album. When you buy a score CD, you don't get the film along with it. Therefore, even as the music may work extremely well in the film, it doesn't mean that it'll make a particularly good album, which is the form of the product you'll be buying. So of course it needs to be reviewed as a standalone composition. DUH!



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Theowne
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  In Response to:
berlioz

  Responses to this Comment:
Paul
Re: It's a film score, not an album   Wednesday, July 2, 2008 (11:07 a.m.) 

> Yet it is sold as a standalone album. When you buy a score CD, you don't
> get the film along with it. Therefore, even as the music may work
> extremely well in the film, it doesn't mean that it'll make a particularly
> good album, which is the form of the product you'll be buying. So of
> course it needs to be reviewed as a standalone composition. DUH!

That's nice, except for the fact that this site does not claim to review how the music sounds on a standalone album. This website constantly makes judgments about film composer's skills and ability. A film composer composes in order to contribute to a film, and you have to decide what you're going to evaluate. Are you reviewing how the music sounds on an album, or are you reviewing the composer's work and output for the film? PICK ONE and don't confuse the two.



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Paul
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bell.net)

  In Response to:
Theowne

  Responses to this Comment:
Theowne
How about picking one screen name, first.   Wednesday, July 2, 2008 (1:00 p.m.) 

> PICK ONE and don't confuse the two.

Choose one screen name and try not to confuse others into thinking you have more people on your side of the argument. How about you use the name "clunky"?



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Theowne
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  In Response to:
Paul
Re: How about picking one screen name, first.   Wednesday, July 2, 2008 (2:39 p.m.) 

> Choose one screen name and try not to confuse others into thinking you
> have more people on your side of the argument. How about you use the name
> "clunky"?

Yes, it was all a grand conspiracy to trick you. It couldn't have been a simple forgetful mistake by a person who (like anyone) uses multiple user names across the net. No, it was a grand scheme meant to trick you, Paul. Because winning on the internet (or filmtracks) just means that much to me.



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Abigailian
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  In Response to:
berlioz

  Responses to this Comment:
Kevin Smith
Re: It's a film score, not an album   Saturday, July 5, 2008 (4:54 p.m.) 

> Yet it is sold as a standalone album. When you buy a score CD, you don't
> get the film along with it. Therefore, even as the music may work
> extremely well in the film, it doesn't mean that it'll make a particularly
> good album, which is the form of the product you'll be buying. So of
> course it needs to be reviewed as a standalone composition. DUH!

Yes and no.

I don't imagine I'm the only one who does this, but I'll listen to a soundtrack as a different way to experience a movie, after I've seen it. The music is the most direct way to reexperience the emotions. In which case, I could care less about it's qualty as a standalone album.

As far as I can tell, a lot of the time it doesn't even seem like he's SEEN the movies that the soundtracks belong to. To me, it would seem fair that he listens to the sondtrack, makes his notes, sees the movie and then looks at it from BOTH perspectives.

He also does seem to pass judgements on composers if forces beyond the composer's control release a crappy album. However, I do think that most film scores SHOULD be released, for the reasons stated in the first paragraph.



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Kevin Smith
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  In Response to:
Abigailian
Re: It's a film score, not an album   Saturday, September 20, 2008 (10:47 a.m.) 

> Yes and no.

> I don't imagine I'm the only one who does this, but I'll listen to a
> soundtrack as a different way to experience a movie, after I've seen it.
> The music is the most direct way to reexperience the emotions. In which
> case, I could care less about it's qualty as a standalone album.

> As far as I can tell, a lot of the time it doesn't even seem like he's
> SEEN the movies that the soundtracks belong to. To me, it would seem fair
> that he listens to the sondtrack, makes his notes, sees the movie and then
> looks at it from BOTH perspectives.

> He also does seem to pass judgements on composers if forces beyond the
> composer's control release a crappy album. However, I do think that most
> film scores SHOULD be released, for the reasons stated in the first
> paragraph.

There are scores for movies that I never want to see, example is Rambo First Blood Part II. So I care about the standalone listen part.

It's just one average review, calm down.



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