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The Thirteenth Floor
(1999)
Album Cover Art
Co-Composed, Co-Conducted, Co-Orchestrated, and Produced by:
Harald Kloser

Co-Composed, Co-Conducted, and Co-Orchestrated by:
Thomas Wanker

Performed by:
Nordwestdeutsche Philharmonie

Vocals by:
The Vienna Choir Boys
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Milan Records
(June 1st, 1999)
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ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
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ALSO SEE




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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you can shut down your brain long enough to enjoy the shamelessly harmonic and predictably simplistic orchestral and choral techniques of Harald Kloser's incongruous score.

Avoid it... if your guilty pleasures require more than just a few gorgeous crescendos of choral majesty and a little 1930's big band flair.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #997
WRITTEN 6/3/99, REVISED 8/27/07
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Kloser
Kloser
The Thirteenth Floor: (Harald Kloser/Thomas Wanker) Based on Daniel Galouye's 1964 novel Simulacron-3, The Thirteenth Floor was part of a mad rush in the late 1990's to develop films that challenge audiences' notions of reality. The king of this movement was obviously The Matrix, though spinoff ideas in Dark City and eXistenZ took advantage of the hype to lesser degrees. The Thirteenth Floor conceptually shares the most with The Matrix, switching constantly between the real world and a simulated one, with the real world being the one less expected. The problem with The Thirteenth Floor is that any audience can figure out the twist early in the film, leaving it as merely an exhibition of different scenery designs in 1937 and 1999. A lackluster cast and crew assembled by producer Roland Emmerich, mostly Germans, would create a film released with both Star Wars: The Phantom Menace and The Matrix in the theatres, dooming the project to a quick death on video shelves. While Emmerich claimed to narrow his search for a composer to one of five, Hollywood novice and Austrian Harald Kloser would receive his big break. While his career would include both The Day After Tomorrow and Alien vs. Predator in the coming years, neither would be as strong as The Thirteenth Floor and his career would languish back in Europe. Considering these three major entries into mainstream scoring, the most immediately obvious aspect of his writing is his inability to form a distinct personality or style in his large-scale scores. This is partly due to the fact that he seems incapable of writing a theme or motif and developing it to satisfaction in any of these films, but Kloser's other problem exists in his faceless and unpredictable approach to these scores. The Thirteenth Floor, like the others, has some highlights. And, in this case, the highlights are easily the best of anything in the three. But despite these high points, The Thirteenth Floor is a score without an identity, relying on the pleasure of the moment to appease listeners trying to establish a continuity to the entire package. That continuity never happens.



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VIEWER RATINGS
306 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 2.5 Stars
***** 38 5 Stars
**** 38 4 Stars
*** 59 3 Stars
** 78 2 Stars
* 93 1 Stars
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COMMENTS
2 TOTAL COMMENTS
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Filmtracks Sponsored Donated Review
Timothy Turner - August 27, 2007, at 7:51 p.m.
1 comment  (1490 views)
Alternative review
Joep - January 12, 2007, at 7:26 a.m.
1 comment  (1514 views)
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Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 52:15
• 1. Downtown L.A., 1937 (1:38)
• 2. Jane's Theme (2:57)
• 3. Downloading (4:35)
• 4. Desert (2:28)
• 5. Locker Chase (1:34)
• 6. Bookstore (2:33)
• 7. Caravan* (4:04)
• 8. St. Louis Blues* (3:04)
• 9. Easy Come, Easy Go* (3:31)
• 10. The 13th Floor (3:49)
• 11. Fuller Goes to Sleep (4:22)
• 12. Techno Download (2:54)
• 13. Flatliner (1:59)
• 14. End of the World (4:28)
• 15. Showdown (1:47)
• 16. Hall is Dead (3:36)
• 17. Where are We? (2:53)

* The Wilshire Swing Suite, performed by Johnny Crawford and his Dance Orchestra

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert notes include a statement about the score by producer Roland Emmerich.
Copyright © 1999-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from The Thirteenth Floor are Copyright © 1998, Milan Records and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 6/3/99 and last updated 8/27/07.
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