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Home Page
1941
(1979)
Album Cover Art
1990 Alhambra
1990 Bay Cities
Album 2 Cover Art
1997 Varèse
Album 3 Cover Art
2011 La-La Land
Album 4 Cover Art
Composed, Conducted, and Produced by:

Orchestrated by:
Herbert W. Spencer
Labels Icon
LABELS & RELEASE DATES
Alhambra A
(1990)

Bay Cities
(1990)

Varèse Sarabande
(September 9th, 1997)

La-La Land Records
(September 27th, 2011)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
The three 1990 and 1997 albums were regular commercial releases, though the 1990 issues are out of print. The 1997 Varèse product was priced at normal retail levels for over a decade. The 2011 La-La Land album is limited to 3,500 copies and available through soundtrack specialty outlets for an initial price of $30.
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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you're among the many who have heard your local marching band crucify the famous title march from 1941 and seek to enjoy the official performances of that sickeningly positive idea as they dominate the entire parody score.

Avoid it... if you don't believe that John Williams can do no wrong, because there is mental instability to be gained from extended exposure to this, the most obnoxious score from the best period of his career.
Review Icon
EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,382
WRITTEN 8/15/09, REVISED 10/12/11
Williams
Williams
1941: (John Williams) As much as director Steven Spielberg has attempted through the years to defend his 1979 production of 1941, his sympathetic audience is limited. Nestled in between Close Encounters of the Third Kind and Raiders of the Lost Ark, the silly parody of World War II Hollywood hysteria was a joint venture between Columbia and Universal that earned enough at the box offices to satisfy the studios (the film lost money in America but doubled its numbers overseas) but failed to gain much support among critics or parts of the industry. It was an important learning experience for the director, who thereafter was more disciplined in his adherence to schedules and budgets. Actor John Wayne, offered a role in the film despite being in his dying days, condemned the picture as unpatriotic and attempted to persuade Spielberg to abandon it. Eventually, 1941 gained a bit more respect in its lengthier, televised director's cut and was recognized with three technical Academy Award nominations. The difficulty that most had with the film is that its puns simply weren't funny, and the entirety of the script was offensive in many socio-political ways (especially to the Japanese). Despite a stellar cast and pokes of fun at other films (including Jaws in the opening reel and The Godfather later on), Spielberg's sense of humor was lost on many who didn't appreciate the subtleties that he was referencing, especially in regards to Hollywood insider topics, ultimately leaving it up to spectacles like exploding gas stations and a submarine-destroyed Ferris wheel (admittedly an amusing idea) to retain interest. The plot basically outlines the mostly fictitious fears of Hollywood right after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, a time at which the mainland figured that Los Angeles could be the next target. Spielberg once remarked that 1941 might have fared better as a musical and, in retrospect, that's a keen observation. Instead, he requested 90 minutes of straight forward comedy music (on top of some source usage) from John Williams, with whom he had already enjoyed great success.

Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
191 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3 Stars
***** 36 5 Stars
**** 41 4 Stars
*** 40 3 Stars
** 36 2 Stars
* 38 1 Stars
  (View results for all titles)

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COMMENTS
2 TOTAL COMMENTS
Read All Start New Thread Search Comments
A Butcher
Antonio - January 11, 2014, at 11:37 a.m.
1 comment  (465 views)
March Vs. Score
Will - September 3, 2009, at 9:42 a.m.
1 comment  (1416 views)
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Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
All 1990 and 1997 Albums Tracks   ▼Total Time: 38:02
• 1. The March from 1941 (4:06)
• 2. The Invasion (8:17)
• 3. The Sentries (3:28)
• 4. Riot at the U.S.O.* (1:16)
• 5. To Hollywood and Glory (3:12)
• 6. Swing, Swing, Swing (4:03)
• 7. The Battle of Hollywood (5:37)
• 8. The Ferris Wheel Sequence** (1:28)
• 9. Finale (6:14)
* traditional, based on "The Rakes of Mallow," arranged by John Williams
** includes "By the Beautiful Sea," composed by Harry Carroll
2011 La-La Land Album Tracks   ▼Total Time: 155:14

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The inserts in the 1990 and 1997 albums contain a short note from Spielberg. That of the 2011 La-La Land album includes extensive details about score and film. In fact, the booklet in the 2011 album is so thick that it barely fits into the jewel case.
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The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from 1941 are Copyright © 1990, 1997, 2011, Alhambra A, Bay Cities, Varèse Sarabande, La-La Land Records and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 8/15/09 and last updated 10/12/11.
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