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Article 99
(1992)
Album Cover Art
Composed and Produced by:

Conducted by:
Shirley Walker

Orchestrated by:
Steve Bartek
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Varèse Sarabande
(March 17th, 1992)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
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ALSO SEE




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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you have always loved Danny Elfman's early film music but have never heard any of Article 99, because this pleasant, lightweight score will make you nostalgic for that period.

Avoid it... if you have no interest in hearing Elfman sleepwalk through redemptive melodies while revisiting shadows of the trademarks that made his other scores of that era so great.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,823
WRITTEN 3/25/10
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Elfman
Elfman
Article 99: (Danny Elfman) Issues of fair treatment for American veterans of war are a serious subject, especially when it comes to the care of those injured in the line of fire. Scandals have helped to illuminate the need to more funding of these services, but back in 1992, veterans with battlefield wounds and complications extending beyond them were in a particularly shunned position. Howard Deutch's movie of that year, Article 99, sought to raise awareness of this government oversight while also entertaining crowds. A solid cast in the roles of creatively devious doctors highlights a script about a Kansas City veterans' hospital in disrepair, the kind of facility that makes those stricken by war wish they had never survived. The director only cares about minimizing the budget, leaving the doctors no choice but to falsify records and go to their own heroic measures to meet the needs of their patients. Unfortunately, Article 99 also attempted to be a comedy from start to finish, formulating television sitcom-like dialogue that pressed for laughs far too often. The consequent cheapening of the subject caused the film to be almost universally pummeled by critics, and the production only grossed about $6 million before fading away into obscurity. The score for Article 99 has proven to be just as obscure for composer Danny Elfman, in part likely because of issues relating to the circumstances of rights eliminating the chance for a sampling of this score to appear on the composer's popular "Music for a Darkened Theatre" compilations of the 1990's. It was Elfman's first feature, solo score after a year of absence following his wildly popular Edward Scissorhands, sneaking onto album just a few months prior to his hyped return to the bright spotlight with Batman Returns. A quickly out of print album didn't help this score's cause, though a certain amount of indifference towards this music also probably arises due to the score's functional but not overwhelming stature. Expectations for Elfman at the time were sky high, and Article 99 seemed like a pleasant but derivative extension of ideas collected from the composer's previous (albeit limited) works. It's a satisfying listening experience, even with obnoxiously poor brass performances, but the focus of the composer's attention was obviously on emphasizing the heart of the story, yielding the kind of conservatively pretty score that Elfman and dozens of other composers could crank out in their sleep.



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VIEWER RATINGS
176 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3.51 Stars
***** 61 5 Stars
**** 42 4 Stars
*** 24 3 Stars
** 25 2 Stars
* 24 1 Stars
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Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 34:25
• 1. Main Title (4:00)
• 2. Death (4:23)
• 3. Mayday (2:47)
• 4. Montage (1:35)
• 5. Shooter (2:57)
• 6. Revelation (1:11)
• 7. Rebellion (3:10)
• 8. Salute (1:29)
• 9. Love Theme (1:00)
• 10. Confrontation (5:01)
• 11. End Credits (6:46)

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes no extra information about the score or film.
Copyright © 2010-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from Article 99 are Copyright © 1992, Varèse Sarabande and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 3/25/10 (and not updated significantly since).
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