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The Crucible
(1996)
Album Cover Art
Composed, Conducted, and Co-Produced by:

Orchestrated by:
Jeff Atmajian

Co-Produced by:
Eliza Thompson
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LABEL & RELEASE DATE
RCA Victor/BMG
(November 26th, 1996)
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ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
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ALSO SEE




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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... only if you have a lingering attachment to this film or wish to complete your collection of vintage George Fenton dramas, this one lacking the passion of the composer's similar works.

Avoid it... if you figure that Fenton would have conjured a blend of romance and dread for this disturbing topic, an approach that he basically attempted but somehow managed to miss entirely in the execution phase.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,780
WRITTEN 2/10/12
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Fenton
Fenton
The Crucible: (George Fenton) Human stupidity is the topic of Arthur Miller's famous play, "The Crucible," which recounts the events of the laughably primordial Salem witch trials. Religious persecution has a rich history in the world, and in the 1690's Massachusetts incident, these senseless acts were efforts to serve the purposes of marital infidelity and jealousy over men. Several imaginative girls pretended to be under the spell of the devil (behavior that would be considered cool and hip at parties just 400 years later) and blamed a number of people in the town for causing their faked medical conditions with witchcraft. Innocent people were hanged in response to the idiotic, prevailing religious customs of the era, all because judges and other governmental institutions were taken advantage of by these girls' whims. When Miller wrote his play in the early 1950's, he was making a thinly-veiled connection between the persecution of the Salem era and the actions of Senator Joe McCarthy and the House Committee on Unamerican Activities that was attempting to root out communists at the time. He returned to the topic in 1996, when he spent a significant amount of time adapting his story into a screenplay for a film to be shot by Nicholas Hytner. Miller was nominated for an Academy Award for his efforts, and the cast, anchored by Daniel Day-Lewis, Winona Ryder, and Joan Allen, was widely praised as well. The story's metaphorical meaning wasn't as potent in the mid-1990's, however, and the movie, despite a reasonably impressive critical reception, failed miserably at the box office. Continuing his collaboration with Hytner was composer George Fenton, who was in between his period of frequent Academy Award recognition in the 1980's and early 1990's and the Emmy-defined post-2000 period dominated by his work for nature documentary programs. Fenton was a major name in Hollywood at the time, his music for the drama genre popular with the art house crowd. His involvement with The Crucible followed directly from The Madness of King George and was one of the production's attempts to push strongly for similar awards recognition. While Fenton's style could stray wildly at times even back then (this trait is more familiar in the 2000's for listeners who compare his documentary music with an endless series of silly comedies), he featured a pretty static orchestral drama mode that was being challenged by Thomas Newman and Richard Robbins by the 1990's, and The Crucible is very standard within that sound.



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VIEWER RATINGS
58 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 2.6 Stars
***** 7 5 Stars
**** 11 4 Stars
*** 10 3 Stars
** 12 2 Stars
* 18 1 Stars
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Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 56:58
Salem, 1692:
• 1. The Crucible Front Titles: Dancing in the Forest (5:19)
• 2. John Proctor (3:58)
• 3. The Village (2:07)

The Witch Hunt Begins:
• 4. Reverend Hale (2:58)
• 5. Meeting at the Inn (1:28)
• 6. Tituba's Confession (3:36)
• 7. Judge Danforth Arrives (1:13)

• 8. Vengeance (4:46)

Accusation:
• 9. Elizabeth Accused (2:25)
• 10. Hale Leaves the Village (2:47)
• 11. Taking Elizabeth (3:04)
• 12. Interrogation (5:46)

• 13. The Hanging (2:13)
• 14. Abigail Disappears (3:02)

Resolution:
• 15. The Beach (2:11)
• 16. Proctor Confesses (6:53)
• 17. Forgive Us (The Crucible End Credits) (3:19)

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes a brief note from the composer about the score. There are no track titles listed on the exterior of the packaging and empty pages on inside of the insert indicate serious design problems with the product.
Copyright © 2012-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from The Crucible are Copyright © 1996, RCA Victor/BMG and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 2/10/12 (and not updated significantly since).
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