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Dad
(1989)
Album Cover Art
Composed, Conducted, Co-Produced, and Performed by:

Orchestrated by:
Greig McRitchie

Co-Produced by:
Jay Gruska
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
MCA Records
(1989)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release, but the album fell out of print quickly. It sold for over $50 in online auctions but eventually became readily available on the secondary market in the 2000's.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you seek inoffensively pretty music in the upper tier of James Horner's personal and subtle human drama scores.

Avoid it... if even the most charming and melodic of Horner's more restrained efforts cannot sustain your interest compared to his otherwise robust orchestral inclinations.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #817
WRITTEN 8/29/97, REVISED 11/7/11
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Horner
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Dad: (James Horner) A story about the self-discovery and reaffirmation of an average, contemporary American family, Dad is another lesson on how to and how not to take care of your parents once they reach the frustrating age of senility. A busy banker in the big city is forced to take leave to attend to his ailing parents and the "coming together" experience helps heal years of distant relationships and the story shows the audience about how older folks can learn to cope with their illnesses and other age-related ailments. The 1989 film dances without finesse between the realms of drama and comedy, perhaps to a level of fault that it cannot recover from. Written and directed by Gary David Goldberg, Dad represented his first feature film after years of directing TV's popular "Family Ties" show. Critical reaction to Dad pounced on this inexperience and often related the problems with the film to the pitfalls typical to sitcom comedies. All of the actors in the production would go on to better representations of their characters in subsequent films (especially Jack Lemmon in the Grumpy Old Men movies), and the same could arguably be said for composer James Horner as well. Best known for his adventure and high drama scores in the 1980's, Horner used his budding efforts in children's genre entries like An American Tail and The Land Before Time to prepare himself for these kind of syrupy, small-scale human drama pictures that would become associated with his sound over the rest of his career. His collaboration with Steven Spielberg's Amblin Entertainment came into play once again in Dad and would lead to several similarly curious projects involving the composer during the following few years. Of his efforts in the intimate human drama genre, many of which become redundant after you evaluate three or four such similar scores, Dad remains one of the more personable and enjoyable works, building a consistently easy-going listening experience around the foundation of one of Horner's very typical children's-styled themes of the era. While Dad isn't exactly a children's film, of course, the composer handles it as such by applying equivalent sensibilities in his light touch and friendly instrumentation. There is nary an offensive moment in what some may find a pedestrian tackling of the topic.



Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
214 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3.1 Stars
***** 54 5 Stars
**** 39 4 Stars
*** 42 3 Stars
** 33 2 Stars
* 46 1 Stars
  (View results for all titles)

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COMMENTS
14 TOTAL COMMENTS
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Review at Movie Wave
Southall - July 15, 2015, at 12:59 p.m.
1 comment  (422 views)
This score really grows on me...   Expand >>
thw - May 1, 2006, at 12:01 a.m.
2 comments  (2820 views)
Newest: June 10, 2007, at 12:09 p.m. by
Sherlock
This site has gotten totally lame!   Expand >>
ElfmanFanatic - October 13, 2005, at 5:10 p.m.
11 comments  (7411 views)
Newest: October 16, 2005, at 5:27 p.m. by
brad
More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 39:13
• 1. Prologue and Main Title (5:15)
• 2. Saying Goodnight (2:31)
• 3. Mopping the Floor (1:01)
• 4. Playing Catch/The Farm (3:26)
• 5. The Vigil (2:22)
• 6. Taking Dad Home (6:39)
• 7. Dad (3:11)
• 8. Recovery (1:26)
• 9. The Greenhouse (4:04)
• 10. Goodbyes (9:09)

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes no extra information about the score or film. The text on the packaging is very difficult to read.
Copyright © 1997-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from Dad are Copyright © 1989, MCA Records and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 8/29/97 and last updated 11/7/11.
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