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Don't Say a Word
(2001)
Album Cover Art
Composed and Produced by:

Orchestrated and Conducted by:
Ken Kugler

Electronics Programmed by:
Jeff Beal
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Varèse Sarabande
(October 16th, 2001)
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ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
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ALSO SEE




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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... only if you are an enthusiast of tense and suspenseful scores that are somewhat predictable in their formation but nevertheless enjoyable.

Avoid it... if only about ten minutes of engaging highlights bracketing twenty minutes of mundane ambience do not justify your time and effort.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #776
WRITTEN 10/27/01, REVISED 2/9/09
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Isham
Isham
Don't Say a Word: (Mark Isham) Although promising in its basic premise, Gary Fleder's Don't Say a Word attempts to wrap too many sub-plots around the compelling coercion of a renown psychiatrist into extracting a six-digit code from the paranoid mind of one of his patients. In yet another role as the contemporary victim, Michael Douglas is the man pushed to the limit of his emotional and physical endurance (a Hollywood formula still in use at the time despite the actor's advancing age). The film was very similar to the other kinds of nightmarish situations that Douglas seemed enjoy being a part of, and although Don't Say a Word fared relatively well, it had the misfortune of debuting at a time when audiences were looking for happier topics in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on America one month prior. Along for the ride in a familiar setting as well was composer Mark Isham, who was a veteran of writing music for catatonic, urban films of a thrillingly grim nature (with the likes of Blade and The Net already on his resume). Undoubtedly, Don't Say a Word was exactly the kind of film that lent itself well to the style of contemporary suspense that Isham was comfortable producing at the time. The music that he wrote for the film, as it falls in the very generic genre of thrillers, could easily be inserted into similar Douglas vehicles like The Game or Fatal Attraction and probably serve just as well. Isham's reputation in some circles entailed that he was able to produce adequately functional music for the usually substandard films he worked for, with an occasionally superior score in the ranks. But that body of work had yet to translate into a popularization of his music outside of context, and nothing heard in Don't Say a Word was destined to change that reputation. The music has brief glimpses of originality and enjoyable character, but it is ultimately the kind of suspense work that supplements a film far better than it can solely occupy the airspace in a room. The foundation of the score is constructed on a basic level with a single piano, providing the delicate family aspect of the film (as well as the innocent child-like side of the deranged young woman with whom Douglas' character is forced to interact) with an often solemn voice. In the conclusive "A Family," the piano is finally allowed a hearty major-key expression of harmony and a much-needed sense of relief. Until that point, the score is consistently grim.



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VIEWER RATINGS
1,002 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 2.98 Stars
***** 170 5 Stars
**** 176 4 Stars
*** 267 3 Stars
** 249 2 Stars
* 140 1 Stars
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COMMENTS
3 TOTAL COMMENTS
Read All Start New Thread Search Comments
Brass Section (Hollywood Studio Symphony)
N.R.Q. - June 2, 2007, at 8:11 a.m.
1 comment  (1611 views)
Don't Say a Word, but Save the Last Dance!   Expand >>
Don Smith - October 30, 2001, at 2:58 p.m.
2 comments  (5376 views)
Newest: May 13, 2002, at 10:38 a.m. by
jason b.
More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 30:49
• 1. Heist (6:02)
• 2. Elisabeth (4:40)
• 3. Kidnapped (4:28)
• 4. A Body (1:37)
• 5. Hart Island (3:38)
• 6. Subway (4:06)
• 7. Mishka (3:13)
• 8. A Family (3:24)

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert contains a list of performers (from the American Federation of Musicians), but no extra information about the film or score.
Copyright © 2001-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from Don't Say a Word are Copyright © 2001, Varèse Sarabande and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 10/27/01 and last updated 2/9/09.
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