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Driving Miss Daisy
(1989)
Album Cover Art
Composed, Arranged, Performed, and Produced by:
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LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Varèse Sarabande
(December 12th, 1989)
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ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
Awards
AWARDS
Nominated for a Grammy Award.
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ALSO SEE




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Availability | Awards | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you seek ultimate proof that Hans Zimmer can uncork whimsically breezy and setting-appropriate music of immense personality and style with only his one-man electronic ensemble.

Avoid it... if you quickly tire of Zimmer's rhythmic light drama and romance music of this era in his career, because Driving Miss Daisy is simply a bluesy variation on those early trademarks of the composer's work.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,498
WRITTEN 3/17/10
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Zimmer
Zimmer
Driving Miss Daisy: (Hans Zimmer) The surprise hit of late 1989 and early 1990 was Bruce Beresford's Driving Miss Daisy, one of the most highly acclaimed adaptations of an off-Broadway play to ever hit the big screen. Morgan Freeman reprised his role from the play and was joined by Jessica Tandy and Dan Aykroyd to form a cast that, along with the film, swept through many of the major awards that year. Most of that recognition came because of the production's ability to remain light-hearted in its character interactions (and PG rating) while also making comments about prejudices against blacks and Jews in America's state of Georgia prior to the civil rights movement. Too old to drive herself around the 1940's countryside, a feisty widow (Tandy) is provided a driver (Freemen) by her son (Aykroyd) and, despite their differences, the woman and her chauffeur become close friends. That bond spans more than two decades and several events that defy racial and religious prejudices of the era, and the film concludes on an incredibly sweet and positive note. The small production, with the help of its immense critical acclaim and awards wins, went on to gross almost twenty times its budget. It was the second year in a row in which rising composer Hans Zimmer had scored the top Oscar-winning picture, though his music for Driving Miss Daisy, despite making an impact in the picture, only received a Grammy nomination. Given the film's slim budget, it's no surprise that the soundtrack was reportedly entirely synthetic, featuring no live instruments in the mix. But what definitely is a surprise, and has always been when listening to this score, is the fact that Zimmer managed to produce so much personality and style from his electronic ensemble for Driving Miss Daisy. The amount of genuine flavor in the solo performances of melody in the work is symbolic of the best of Zimmer's early creativity. This music has all the bluesy and/or jazzy sensibilities of similar passages in Thomas Newman's Fried Green Tomatoes and Jerry Goldsmith's Love Field, but without the benefit of acoustic instrumentation. There is a whimsical, breezy aspect to the score that gives it an undeniably easy flow, too. When you hear about long-time collectors of Zimmer's music complaining about how lifeless the composer's eventual blockbuster mannerisms sound (despite the improvement in synthesizer and sample technologies), scores like Driving Miss Daisy remain the benchmark by which those comparisons are drawn.

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VIEWER RATINGS
143 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3.31 Stars
***** 38 5 Stars
**** 34 4 Stars
*** 29 3 Stars
** 19 2 Stars
* 23 1 Stars
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Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 35:57
• 1. Kiss of Fire - performed by Louis Armstrong (3:04)
• 2. Santa Baby - performed by Eartha Kitt (2:23)
• 3. Driving (6:50)
• 4. Home (3:23)
• 5. Georgia (7:55)
• 6. End Titles (4:51)
• 7. Song to the Moon (Excerpt from the Opera Rusalka) - composed by Antonin Dvorak (6:05)

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NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes no extra information about the score or film.
Copyright © 2010-2015, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from Driving Miss Daisy are Copyright © 1989, Varèse Sarabande and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 3/17/10 (and not updated significantly since).
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