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The Edge
Album Cover Art
1997 BMG/RCA
2010 La-La Land
Album 2 Cover Art
Composed, Conducted, Co-Orchestrated, and Produced by:

Co-Orchestrated by:
Alexander Courage

2010 Album Produced by:
Nick Redman
Mike Matessino
Labels Icon
BMG Music/RCA Victor
(Sept 30th, 1997)

La-La Land Records
(June 15th, 2010)
Availability Icon
The 1997 BMG/RCA album was a regular U.S. release but went out of print by the early 2000's and sold for $75 or more. The 2010 La-La Land album is a limited pressing of 3,500 copies, available at soundtrack specialty outlets for $20.
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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you collect Jerry Goldsmith's soaring and majestic title themes of uninhibited harmony for bold horns and want to hear the composer creatively orchestrate most of his own material for the first time in decades.

Avoid it... if you expect Goldsmith's trademark strength for extended periods of time in action and suspense sequences that reflect the mannerisms of The Ghost of the Darkness without capturing the same intensity.
Review Icon
WRITTEN 10/1/97, REVISED 6/23/10
The Edge: (Jerry Goldsmith) If you like seeing rich businessmen and smarmy socialites stranded in the Alaska's wilderness and chased by nasty wildlife (and each other), then The Edge is a film far more likely to amuse you than thrill you. Even more impressive than Anthony Hopkins and Alec Baldwin battling the elements and their distrust of each other is the combination of the Alaska landscape (actually shot in Alberta, Canada) and the always intriguing acting work of Bart the Bear, this time in one of his final performances. The billionaire and the photographer for his model wife crash in a small plane while searching for locations to do a shoot, and along the road to possible rescue, unnecessary characters are slaughtered and the bear stalks the survivors with the same unyielding, cold attitude as the outdoors itself. It is this natural element that guided Jerry Goldsmith's score for the film, one of the veteran's more memorable efforts of his later years and an arguably superior listening experience to his concurrent, more highly praised L.A. Confidential. For long time collectors of the composer, The Edge has always been a second-tier favorite, but the score is more importantly an unusual work for Goldsmith in that era of his career. While the composition may, on the whole, resemble most of his other action scores from the 1990's, it has a few distinct characteristics that set it apart. First, despite the film's highly concentrated character development, none of the main principals receives any kind of theme (or even any motif, really). Some may argue that the title theme alternately belongs to Hopkins' character, but its application is more closely tied to the general concept of sophistication versus nature. Second, Goldsmith treats his title theme quite differently in The Edge, with much more significant airtime provided for the broad, graceful theme than in his usual writing. To this end, horn lovers should rejoice, because this score uses more massively harmonic, unimpeded performances by the instrument than in nearly any other Goldsmith score. Third, director Lee Tamahori instructed Goldsmith not employ his usual array of synthesizers and, as a result, Goldsmith would largely orchestrate the score himself (a task he had not accomplished in many decades). Finally, with a little extra recording time left at the end of the sessions, Goldsmith and Tamahori decided it would be fun to manipulate the grand title theme into an intimate jazz rendition. The result of all of these little quirky aspects of The Edge is a score that is just as intriguing to study (for a collector of the composer) as it is to sit back and enjoy.

Ratings Icon
Average: 3.4 Stars
***** 384 5 Stars
**** 478 4 Stars
*** 569 3 Stars
** 297 2 Stars
* 107 1 Stars
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One Fine Score
Chris_FSB*25 - April 10, 2013, at 5:43 p.m.
1 comment  (485 views)
A very good soundtrack
Rende - October 4, 2006, at 2:45 p.m.
1 comment  (2541 views)

Track Listings Icon
Audio Samples   ▼
1997 BMG/RCA Album Tracks   ▼Total Time: 38:03
• 1. Lost in the Wild (3:01)
• 2. The Ravine (4:38)
• 3. Birds (2:24)
• 4. Mighty Hunter (1:34)
• 5. Bitter Coffee (3:03)
• 6. Stalking (5:47)
• 7. Deadfall (6:16)
• 8. The River (2:21)
• 9. Rescued (6:04)
• 10. The Edge (2:57)
2010 La-La Land Album Tracks   ▼Total Time: 66:05

Notes Icon
The insert of the 1997 BMG/RCA album includes no extra information about the score or film. The 2010 La-La Land album's insert contains notes about both, though it does not address the role that the director had in shaping the score.
Copyright © 1997-2015, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from The Edge are Copyright © 1997, 2010, BMG Music/RCA Victor, La-La Land Records and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 10/1/97 and last updated 6/23/10.
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