SUPPORT FILMTRACKS! CLICK HERE FIRST:
Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk
iTunes (U.S.)
Amazon.ca
Amazon.fr
eBay (U.S.)
Amazon.de
Amazon.es
Half.com
Glisten Effect
Editorial Reviews
Scoreboard Forum
Viewer Ratings
Composers
Awards
   NEWEST MAJOR REVIEWS:
     1. Transformers: Last Knight
    2. Cars 3
   3. The Mummy
  4. Wonder Woman
 5. POTC: Dead Men Tell No Tales
6. Alien: Covenant


   CURRENT BEST-SELLING SCORES:
       1. Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
      2. Fantastic Beasts/Find Them
     3. Willow
    4. The Ghost and the Darkness
   5. An American Tail
  6. The Wind and the Lion
 7. Doctor Strange
8. 10 Cloverfield Lane
   CURRENT MOST POPULAR REVIEWS:
         1. Star Wars: Force Awakens
        2. E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
       3. Titanic
      4. Avatar
     5. Nineteen Eighty-Four
    6. Gladiator
   7. Star Wars: A New Hope
  8. Animal Farm
 9. LOTR: Fellowship of the Ring
10. Harry Potter: Sorcerer's Stone
Home Page
Extreme Close-Up
(1990)
Album Cover Art
Composed, Conducted, and Co-Performed by:

Produced by:
Douglass Fake

Co-Performed by:
Randy Kerber
Ian Underwood
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Intrada Records
(October 26th, 2009)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Limited pressing of 1,500 copies, retailing for $20 and available only through soundtrack specialty outlets. Its price escalated to $30 or more after the product sold out.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
Also See Icon
ALSO SEE




Decorative Nonsense
PRINTER FRIENDLY VIEW
(inverts site colors)



   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... only if you seek to complete your collection of James Horner scores with this appropriately introspective and depressing piano, woodwind, and synthesizer music.

Avoid it... if you ever want to emerge from the foggy and dreary atmosphere of this sparsely respectful and pretty score during its brief and arguably monotonous running time.
Review Icon
EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,786
WRITTEN 5/26/10
Shopping Icon
BUY IT

Horner
Horner
Extreme Close-Up: (James Horner) The topic of depression has rarely been hammered home as thoroughly as it was in the MGM television film Extreme Close-Up, produced by Ed Zwick and airing October 22nd, 1990, on NBC. Despite positive reviews all around, the movie went on to limited exposure and failed to gain a video or DVD release. Starring Blair Brown and Craig T. Nelson in the roles of parents of three children, Extreme Close-Up deals with the depression and ineffectiveness of those characters, though examined in a different way. The mother's attempts at suicide and eventual self-destruction are viewed in flashbacks through the video tapes of one of her sons, who is obsessed with living his life through the edited movies he creates from his constantly rolling tape. As frustrating as the mother's spiraling existence is, the son's inability to grasp the real world is the troubled center of the story. Only by rearranging portions of his footage into new montages can he finally break loose and not only connect with reality, but also help to bring his ailing family together. As you can tell, Extreme Close-Up isn't exactly the kind movie you seek for pure enjoyment, and for anyone who has dealt with the successful suicide of a family member, it's a touchy subject. This film goes a bit far in pushing the topic, arguably, by making the fiery automobile accident that claimed the mother's life available on videotape, however, which seems too conveniently concocted. By 1990, composer James Horner had graduated from the realm of television which he had considered a place where many promising scoring careers go to die. He was always the type to seek only the opportunities in feature film scoring, though he did take a few early assignments for the small screen. One of his later endeavors was indeed Extreme Close-Up, brought about through the overwhelmingly successful collaboration with Zwick on the previous year's Glory. Horner had clearly established himself as a master of fantasy, science-fiction, drama, and any other genre conducive to scores of substantial scope. The early 1990's saw a shift towards intimate character scores of equal harmony and lesser volume from the composer, however, and Extreme Close-Up is an early reflection of the resulting style of music.



Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
84 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 2.63 Stars
***** 9 5 Stars
**** 13 4 Stars
*** 21 3 Stars
** 20 2 Stars
* 21 1 Stars
  (View results for all titles)

Comments Icon
COMMENTS
0 TOTAL COMMENTS
Read All Start New Thread Search Comments


No Comments

More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 37:41
• 1. Extreme Close-Up (1:03)
• 2. Late Night Video (3:06)
• 3. Mother's Funeral (4:39)
• 4. David and Dad Talk (3:12)
• 5. Attempted Suicide (7:31)
• 6. It Wasn't a Crime (3:29)
• 7. New Rules (3:03)
• 8. Mother's Accident (4:01)
• 9. Final Tribute (7:18)

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes basic information about the score and film.
Copyright © 2010-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from Extreme Close-Up are Copyright © 2009, Intrada Records and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 5/26/10 (and not updated significantly since).
Reviews Preload Scoreboard decoration Ratings Preload Composers Preload Awards Preload Home Preload Search Preload