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Fair Game
(2010)
Album Cover Art
Composed and Produced by:

Co-Orchestrated and Conducted by:
Gavin Greenaway

Co-Orchestrated by:
John Ashton Thomas
Tommy Laurence
Germaine Franco
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Lakeshore Records
(November 2nd, 2010)
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ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
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AWARDS
None.
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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you like music that reminds you of the fact that government should make you feel uncomfortable, a sound competently conveyed by John Powell in this cold, prickly score.

Avoid it... if you value continuity of construct beyond just the instrumental palette, in which case this very light variation on the rhythmic movement and percussive slapping of The Bourne Identity will bore you.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,721
WRITTEN 11/17/10
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Powell
Powell
Fair Game: (John Powell) All you apologists for former American Vice President Dick Cheney out there need not pay attention to Doug Liman's 2010 adaptation of the books written by Valerie Plame and Joseph Wilson, because if you're an apologist for Cheney's evil tenure as the grand puppet master of the White House from 2001 to 2009, then Fair Game is likely to only piss you off. Such staunch conservatives will surely brush aside Fair Game as the stuff of liberal fantasies (especially with actor Sean Penn involved), but the truly scary aspect of the film is the amount of fact included in its narrative. The basics about Plame and Wilson aren't really disputed; the government operative and diplomat were the victims of Cheney's retribution for Wilson's public rebuke of George W. Bush's primary case for war against Iraq (that being the probable existence of weapons of mass destruction). After the revelation of the identity of Plame as a CIA agent, several important contacts working with the American government around the world were killed, and the office of the Vice President was forever tarnished for its political viciousness. The film portrays the spin of these events without relying upon too much narrative fiction (depicting nearly everyone by their real names, including roles for administration henchmen Scooter Libby, Ari Fleisher, and Karl Rove), the villain clearly being Cheney and the clueless goat clearly shown to be Bush, though the tension that makes Fair Game a political thriller despite using recent, known events is generated through the concurrent examination of the complex marriage between Plame and Wilson. Those attempting to forget the Bush administration's disastrous tenure may find redemption in this second half of emphasis in Fair Game, bolstered by strong performances by Penn as Wilson and Naomi Watts as Plame. Not unexpectedly, the film was received with considerable critical praise and was immediately adopted as a likely candidate for awards recognition given its inevitable anti-Bush spin. Liman had collaborated with composer John Powell for his two more successful action/chase thrillers of the 2000's, The Bourne Identity and Mr. & Mrs. Smith, and Powell once again returns, this time for a production with a far more limited budget. There is a sense of propulsive movement to the events in Fair Game that would suggest that a light variant of the score for The Bourne Identity would be merited, the instrumentation largely the same but the tone scaled back to emphasize the intrigue of more realistic espionage and political deceit.



Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
215 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 2.57 Stars
***** 15 5 Stars
**** 34 4 Stars
*** 59 3 Stars
** 59 2 Stars
* 48 1 Stars
  (View results for all titles)

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COMMENTS
4 TOTAL COMMENTS
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Clearly you had too much fun writing this review, Christian.   Expand >>
Jockolantern - November 22, 2010, at 7:50 p.m.
4 comments  (1560 views)
Newest: November 29, 2010, at 8:11 p.m. by
Mikal
More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 40:10
• 1. Kuala Lumpur (1:40)
• 2. The White House (2:22)
• 3. Gathering Intel (3:04)
• 4. Joe's Report (3:57)
• 5. Bruises (1:37)
• 6. Smaky (1:00)
• 7. Sixteen Words (2:59)
• 8. Run Up to War (2:55)
• 9. Change the Story (3:08)
• 10. Uncomfortable Love (6:04)
• 11. Breaking Point (3:58)
• 12. Ready to Fight (2:55)
• 13. Testify (4:32)

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NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes no extra information about the score or film.
Copyright © 2010-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from Fair Game are Copyright © 2010, Lakeshore Records and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 11/17/10 (and not updated significantly since).
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