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The Final Cut
(2004)
Album Cover Art
Composed, Co-Orchestrated, Conducted, and Produced by:

Co-Orchestrated by:
Robert Elhai
Dana Niu

Notable Solo Performances by:
Charles Jacot
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Varèse Sarabande
(September 28th, 2004)
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ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
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ALSO SEE




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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you appreciated the sustained style of tempo and cyclical structure that Brian Tyler utilized in other suspense scores of the era (such as Godsend) and have great patience for his subtler fare.

Avoid it... if you require transparent narrative development of motifs and more extroverted personality in the tone of your Tyler scores, because this entry is effectively mundane.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,134
WRITTEN 10/23/04, REVISED 10/17/11
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Tyler
Tyler
The Final Cut: (Brian Tyler) In yet another film which attempts to merge introspective drama with a touch of intriguing science fiction, Omar Naim's The Final Cut deals with the premise that people of the future will have a memory chip implanted in themselves that will observe every waking moment of their life. When a person dies, the chip is extracted and a professional known as a "cutter" will surf through that person's memories and produce a two-hour film containing all of the best moments of his or her life so that the family of that deceased person can enjoy the memories together. One of the better "cutters" is Robin Williams' character, a detached and somber individual troubled by his own memories, and The Final Cut allowed Williams to further explore the darker genres he had seemed to prefer in films since 2002. As a finished product, The Final Cut suffers from the fact that it creates a variety of fascinating storylines, theoretical possibilities, and worthy questions without addressing even a fraction of them. Without the action of the similarly themed The Minority Report from a few years prior, this 2004 Naim film simply failed to convince audiences and critics of its sincerity. The project did, however, capture the interest of composer Brian Tyler, whose predictable fascination with the morbid subject matter thrilled the director and led to an amicable and fluid relationship between the two on this project. Despite his relatively newfound position in the industry, Tyler had already scored a fair share of suspense films and stakes his career on them, including those in the most recent year. Both Godsend and Paparazzi fall under this genre, though Godsend is far more closely related to The Final Cut than the latter score. In fact, many of the same underlying techniques relating to tempo and application of melody are similarly explored in Godsend and The Final Cut, and listeners who enjoyed the first will likely find merit in the second. Their accessibility and general tone are largely the same, despite the latter's tendency to remind more often of other composers' music. Less openly tense than some of Tyler's equivalent works, The Final Cut relies upon intrigue rather than thrills. Despite a few crescendos that lead cues to false conclusions (as in "Zoe Revelation"), the mass of the score is orchestrally cyclical and somewhat minimalistic by nature. The sound of the music differs from the composer's other entries, too, likely due to the recording of the score in a Washington chapel and the comparatively dry ambience that surprisingly results.



Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
160 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 2.95 Stars
***** 27 5 Stars
**** 27 4 Stars
*** 45 3 Stars
** 33 2 Stars
* 28 1 Stars
  (View results for all titles)

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COMMENTS
4 TOTAL COMMENTS
Read All Start New Thread Search Comments
Enchanted Days is good
Kris - November 6, 2004, at 10:45 p.m.
1 comment  (2063 views)
What's with Tyler's hair?
no name - October 27, 2004, at 12:07 p.m.
1 comment  (2148 views)
Review inaccuracy   Expand >>
Ryan - October 27, 2004, at 11:17 a.m.
2 comments  (3097 views)
Newest: October 27, 2004, at 2:59 p.m. by
Randy G
More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 63:12
• 1. The Final Cut Main Title (3:55)
• 2. Fletcher the Cutter (1:48)
• 3. Download Preparation (1:41)
• 4. Dreams (2:51)
• 5. Protestors (1:41)
• 6. Don't Touch (0:58)
• 7. Zoe Revelation (2:51)
• 8. Desperate Pursuit (1:58)
• 9. Absolution (1:17)
• 10. Enchanted Days - performed by Kathryn Bostic (4:03)
• 11. Eye Tech (3:06)
• 12. Bittersweet (1:23)
• 13. Tattoo Parlor (1:14)
• 14. Alan's Memory (4:39)
• 15. Hollow - performed by Ja Wah (3:31)
• 16. Enter Apartment (1:58)
• 17. Alan the Cutter (3:43)
• 18. Sin Eater (1:38)
• 19. Inversion (1:22)
• 20. Seeing a Ghost (1:49)
• 21. Violation (1:44)
• 22. Riga de Pichetto (1:13)
• 23. Outside Theater (0:42)
• 24. The Amazing Alan (1:05)
• 25. Journey Back (4:27)
• 26. I, Bannister (0:40)
• 27. Rememory (2:39)
• 28. The Final Cut End Title (3:01)

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes a short note from the director about Tyler and the score.
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The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from The Final Cut are Copyright © 2004, Varèse Sarabande and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 10/23/04 and last updated 10/17/11.
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