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The Glass House
(2001)
Album Cover Art
Composed and Co-Produced by:

Co-Produced by:
Flavio Motalla
Jonathan Price

Conducted by:
Pete Anthony
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LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Varèse Sarabande
(September 11th, 2001)
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ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
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AWARDS
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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you appreciate Christopher Young's suspense scores that anchor themselves with a solid melodic presence and the melancholy performances of a solo piano.

Avoid it... if the grim and anxious environment of such scores is too overbearing in tone to relax to the seven minutes of purely harmonic thematic exploration in this work.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,215
WRITTEN 9/25/01, REVISED 2/10/09
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Young
Young
The Glass House: (Christopher Young) The brainless storyline of 2001's The Glass House involves the adoption of two teenagers by a couple who were the best friends of the kids' parents before they were promptly disposed of early in the film via the typical car crash scenario. Making matters worse is a creepy cliff-side house on the ocean where the adopting couple becomes the target of the surviving teen girl's suspicion of foul play. Could it be that these adoptive parents are actually diabolical agents of evil poised to steal the considerable fortune left behind for the kids? It's not a unique story-line, but the setting plays a minor role in how veteran composer Christopher Young chose to approach the scoring of the film. The methodology of suspense was no stranger to Young, whose long and busy career had already been highlighted by several popular scores in that genre. It is this area in which Young garnered his fame, and while he may have increasingly experimented in other genres as his career matured, he has never lost his touch for orchestral fright. Granted, he hasn't produced a score with the overwhelming brute force of Hellraiser II in many years, but works such as Copycat, Species, and The Glass House offer an intelligently balanced alternative to the usual slasher scoring techniques heard in countless low budget productions of the genre. There is nothing flashy about Young's score for The Glass House, but not only is it sure to impress the veteran composer's fan base, it also extends a hand to listeners otherwise repulsed the predictability of the application of dissonance in such scores. Young's suspense scores sometimes contain two elements that the composer has utilized to the point of mastery, and The Glass House features both. First, the role of the piano is prominent in the majority of the score. The cliff-side setting of the house, along with the grand vista of the ocean offered through its enormous windows, present the tumultuous sea in all of its glory and chaos, and Young counters by creating a fluid movement in his trademark melancholy piano compositions. The expressions of the title theme for the film, exhibited impressively in the opening and final tracks on the album presentation, include piano performances that wander as elegantly but unpredictably as the ocean itself, and they offer an aural enhancement of the slow, but momentous build-up of suspicion in the plot. Unfortunately, the piano doesn't figure into many of the cues in between, replaced by a cello in a few places, but the identity of the score is still clearly established in the piano's domain.



Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
458 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 2.86 Stars
***** 75 5 Stars
**** 73 4 Stars
*** 118 3 Stars
** 97 2 Stars
* 95 1 Stars
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COMMENTS
2 TOTAL COMMENTS
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Alternative review.
Fernando Pereyra - October 9, 2001, at 3:37 p.m.
1 comment  (2121 views)
Wow, thats lovely
bucky - October 5, 2001, at 3:17 a.m.
1 comment  (2156 views)
More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 36:44
• 1. The Glass House (2:22)
• 2. Sunken Bells (3:17)
• 3. Even If I Had an Ax (3:25)
• 4. Through A Glass Eye (2:33)
• 5. Twice Told Tales (4:49)
• 6. Sotto Voce (2:12)
• 7. Glasseration (3:27)
• 8. Diabetic Dancer (2:40)
• 9. Where in Time? (4:01)
• 10. Soubrette (2:55)
• 11. This Too Shall Pass (4:38)

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes a list of performers, but no extra information about the score or film.
Copyright © 2001-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from The Glass House are Copyright © 2001, Varèse Sarabande and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 9/25/01 and last updated 2/10/09.
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