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The Godfather
(1972)
Album Cover Art
Composed and Produced by:
Nino Rota

Conducted by:
Carlo Savina
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LABEL & RELEASE DATE
MCA Records
(March 26th, 1991)
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ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
Awards
AWARDS
Originally nominated for an Academy Award, but ruled ineligible due to re-use of previously written material. Winner of a BAFTA Award, a Golden Globe, and a Grammy Award.
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ALSO SEE




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Availability | Awards | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you have fond memories of the classic Nino Rota themes that enamored and impressed audiences with their ability to merge Sicilian tradition with symphonic romanticism for this influential production.

Avoid it... if you expect to hear either a truly well-rounded score outside of its primary three themes or, for that matter, any decent album release of the score whatsoever.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,346
WRITTEN 10/3/09
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The Godfather: (Nino Rota) It has been successfully argued many times that no film has had as much impact on cinema as Francis Ford Coppola's original The Godfather. The 1972 powerhouse not only defined the entire subsequent genre of mob-related films, but remains a brutally memorable exhibit of dramatic storytelling at its most compelling. The adaptation of Mario Puzo's best-selling and controversial novel, accomplished by Coppola and the author himself, was so encapsulating that it warranted every minute of its nearly three-hour running time, leaving enough room for the longer plot of the second film in this franchise to expand even further upon the same characters. Whereas most films utilize, intentionally or not, stereotypes in the definition of their characters, Puzo and Coppola invented an entire realm of new stereotypes in The Godfather. The story of the now famous trilogy of films follows the progression of the original New York mafia families in their efforts to survive and adapt in the times from the 1900's to the 1990's, the first two films tackling the initial threat posed by the introduction of the drug trade into the traditional operations of these bases of power. The trilogy ultimately defines itself as the story of Michael Corleone, desperate to retain the Sicilian traditions of his father while moving the family forward into these new, more global avenues of wealth. His ultimate failure, foreshadowed in his ascension in The Godfather and progressively more shocking in the endings of the two sequels, guides the music of these films to a similarly depressing end. Like the films, the work of Nino Rota and Carmine Coppola for the soundtracks of these productions is engrained in the memory of the mainstream, defining the sound of mafia music much like the characters influenced later incarnations of essentially the same idea. If you boil down the plot elements of The Godfather to their most basic ingredients, they would be tradition, love, and fear. Rota's score for the film perfectly embodies these three aspects of the story, licensing ten or so existing pieces for source usage. Carmine Coppola, the director's father, wrote a small amount of original source material for The Godfather, increasing his efforts in this regard as the trilogy progressed.

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VIEWER RATINGS
278 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3.86 Stars
***** 133 5 Stars
**** 54 4 Stars
*** 41 3 Stars
** 20 2 Stars
* 30 1 Stars
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COMMENTS
2 TOTAL COMMENTS
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The Godfather Formula
Bruno Costa - December 5, 2010, at 4:39 a.m.
1 comment  (694 views)
Was "The Pickup" used in the film?
Richard Kleiner - October 26, 2009, at 6:56 p.m.
1 comment  (922 views)
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Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 31:30
• 1. The Godfather Waltz or Main Title (3:04)
• 2. I Have But One Heart - written by Johnny Farrow and Marty Symes, performed by Al Martino (2:57)
• 3. The Pickup (2:56)
• 4. Connie's Wedding - written by Carmine Coppola (1:33)
• 5. The Halls of Fear (2:12)
• 6. Sicilian Pastorale (3:01)
• 7. Love Theme from The Godfather (2:41)
• 8. The Godfather Waltz (3:38)
• 9. Apollonia (1:21)
• 10. The New Godfather (1:58)
• 11. The Baptism (1:49)
• 12. The Godfather Finale (3:50)

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes no extra information about the score or film. It doesn't even include the same amount of credits information as the much older LP record album.
Copyright © 2009-2015, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from The Godfather are Copyright © 1991, MCA Records and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 10/3/09 (and not updated significantly since).
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