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Invincible
(2002)
Album Cover Art
Co-Composed by:

Co-Composed, Conducted, and Produced by:
Klaus Badelt

Vocals Performed by:
Roni Kirwan
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Milan Records
(September 10th, 2002)
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ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
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AWARDS
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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you seek a combination of the yearning beauty of the string motifs in The Thin Red Line and the melodramatic weight of The House of the Spirits.

Avoid it... if you agree with critics who believe that Hans Zimmer's "mushy" tone of over-extended emotional reach tends to wash the tension out of serious dramas.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #912
WRITTEN 9/21/03, REVISED 3/2/09
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Zimmer
Zimmer
Badelt
Badelt
Invincible: (Hans Zimmer/Klaus Badelt) The first mainstream film by director Werner Herzog in many years, 2002's Invincible was a polarizing tale of human dignity and religious allegory set in Nazi Germany during its early pre-war years. It tells the story of the world's strongest man, a modern carnival attraction that was popular even back as far as the early 1930's. A talent scout finds this man of strength and brings him to a German show house with live acts (run by Tim Roth, who brutally portrays the theatre owner and a clairvoyant for Hitler), where the boyish strongman lifts boulders and performs other outstanding feats. The conflict of the story arises in the fact that the strongman is a Polish Jew in a country slowly being squeezed by the Nazis. And, as part of the necessary allegory of the story, the strongman, like Samson, reveals his true self during a live performance (tearing off his blonde wig and gladiator's uniform). The surprising tale spirals from there, including a love triangle and a predictably unhappy ending. The film was met with either immense praise or intense dissatisfaction by critics and viewers, with the morbidly depressing allegory balanced on screen by phenomenally beautiful art direction and stunning cinematography within the theatre itself. Always attempting to expand upon the genres of films that he accepted as assignments, composer Hans Zimmer had been fighting a recent typecasting into the role of scoring big action and drama films by 2002. In fact, despite similar blockbuster scores early in his career, Zimmer was well respected for taking projects like Invincible and providing them with highly effective music. In this case, Zimmer teamed up once again with German counterpart Klaus Badelt; the previous year, the two had collaborated on an equally dramatic, but far more introspective and personal score for the character drama The Pledge. While Invincible does not exist on as remote a level of instrumentation and alienation as The Pledge, it does offer the same heavily dramatic base as that score, this time with a symphonic ensemble. Zimmer's sensibilities can be heard throughout Invincible, but it's likely that Badelt's greater role in the production of this score was an ongoing trend that would lead him to take primary credit over Zimmer (as legally necessary) for their forthcoming blockbuster hit, Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl.



Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
412 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3.43 Stars
***** 113 5 Stars
**** 108 4 Stars
*** 87 3 Stars
** 52 2 Stars
* 52 1 Stars
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Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 47:39
• 1. The Journey (2:45)
• 2. Siegfried, the Iron King (2:09)
• 3. Master of the Occult (8:12)
• 4. The Prophecy (1:41)
• 5. Souls (3:07)
• 6. Martha Lifts the Elephant (2:07)
• 7. Visions (6:34)
• 8. The Unknown Just (7:21)
• 9. Benjamin Believes (2:08)
• 10. 3rd Piano Concerto 2nd Movement - written by Beethoven (3:30)
• 11. Ombra mai fú - written by Handel (3:15)
• 12. Sweet & Lovely - performed by Max Raabe (2:59)
• 13. You're the Cream in my Coffee - performed by Max Raabe (3:13)

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NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes no extra information about the score or film.
Copyright © 2003-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from Invincible are Copyright © 2002, Milan Records and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 9/21/03 and last updated 3/2/09.
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