SUPPORT FILMTRACKS! CLICK HERE FIRST:
Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk
iTunes (U.S.)
Amazon.ca
Amazon.fr
eBay (U.S.)
Amazon.de
Amazon.es
Half.com
Glisten Effect
Editorial Reviews
Scoreboard Forum
Viewer Ratings
Composers
Awards
   NEWEST MAJOR REVIEWS:
     1. Jurassic World
    2. Tomorrowland
   3. San Andreas
  4. Mad Max: Fury Road
 5. Avengers: Age of Ultron
6. Cinderella
   BEST OF JAMES HORNER (1953-2015):
         1. Star Trek II: Wrath of Khan
        2. Willow
       3. The Land Before Time
      4. Glory
     5. Legends of the Fall
    6. Apollo 13
   7. Titanic
  8. The Legend of Zorro
 9. Avatar
10. The Amazing Spider-Man
Home Page
John Carter
(2012)
Album Cover Art
Composed and Produced by:

Co-Orchestrated and Conducted by:
Tim Simonec

Co-Orchestrated by:
Andrea Datzman
Peter Boyer
Mark Gasbarro
Ira Hearshen
Norman Ludwin
Cameron Patrick
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Walt Disney Records
(March 6th, 2012)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release. The CD version of the soundtrack, despite its bargain retail pricing, was advertised as being "limited," but the quantity of the production run was never specified.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
Also See Icon
ALSO SEE




Decorative Nonsense
PRINTER FRIENDLY VIEW
(inverts site colors)



   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you constantly yearn for a return to the days of John Williams' symphonic adventure and fantasy style of bombastic and dynamic "space opera" grandeur from the late 1970's and early 1980's.

Avoid it... if you expect Michael Giacchino, despite his uncanny ability to emulate some of the best Williams techniques, to reach the same level of narrative mastery despite writing an enthusiastic and entertaining throwback romp.
Review Icon
EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,058
WRITTEN 4/2/12
Shopping Icon
BUY IT


iTunes (5.99)


Giacchino
Giacchino
John Carter: (Michael Giacchino) It only took one hundred years for Edgar Rice Burroughs' 1912 science fiction novels to be adapted to the big screen, but not due a lack of trying. The concept was originally set to become the first feature-length animated movie in American history in the mid-1930's, though MGM pulled the plug after years of production work because the concept was deemed to outlandish for audiences at the time. Through the subsequent decades, the concept languished in limbo due to perpetual assessments that special effects technology had not matured enough to do justice to the story. When Disney finally went ahead with John Carter in the 2010's, the studio envisioned a trilogy of adventures, the first establishing how the titular Earthling came to become a hero on Mars. The former American Confederate Cavalry solider is transported accidentally to Mars in 1868 and finds himself in the midst of a civil war between various races of creatures that range from normal humanoids to the tall, nasty-looking green aliens more commonly associated with the planet. A mixture of beasts from Middle-Earth and flight technology from the future collide in this conflict, and Carter fortunately discovers that due to Mars' lesser gravity and his own bone density, he has movement and fighting capabilities beyond those of the native inhabitants. There is, of course, a princess involved, as well as massive battles for control of the planet and some misdirection back on Earth to set up a cinematic sequel. Disney, however, did not impress critics and American audiences upon the debut of John Carter, the highly mixed reviews (largely praising the look but lambasting the script) translating into surprisingly poor domestic box office numbers. While the international earnings for the movie were substantially better (seemingly bringing overall grosses nearly even with the $250 million budget), Disney publicly declared the film a massive loss after all considerations. Oblivious to all of this turmoil was composer Michael Giacchino, who was instructed by director Andrew Stanton to write a hugely orchestral space opera score from the height of the 1970's and 1980's for the concept. Giacchino had affirmed his feature career scoring Pixar movies in the 2000's, but for Disney and John Carter, he impressively supplies music of a different level of bravado and scale in the fantasy genre. It's the kind of throwback assignment that typically makes composers giddy, especially with the resources available to Giacchino for this project.

Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
478 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3.7 Stars
***** 173 5 Stars
**** 127 4 Stars
*** 87 3 Stars
** 48 2 Stars
* 43 1 Stars
  (View results for all titles)

Comments Icon
COMMENTS
8 TOTAL COMMENTS
Read All Start New Thread Search Comments
Review
FilmMusicSite.com - July 5, 2013, at 1:56 a.m.
1 comment  (374 views)
Michael Giacchino's compelling achievement in music writing
LordoftheFuture - November 12, 2012, at 7:16 p.m.
1 comment  (698 views)
Great Score!
NjabuloPhungula - May 21, 2012, at 12:02 a.m.
1 comment  (800 views)
Dan Wallin.   Expand >>
hewhomustnotbenamed - April 4, 2012, at 3:19 a.m.
4 comments  (1558 views)
Newest: December 23, 2013, at 3:17 p.m.by NoImSparticus
Music Muse Review - John Carter (Michael Giacchino
KK - April 2, 2012, at 6:03 p.m.
1 comment  (940 views)
More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 74:13
• 1. A Thern for the Worse (7:38)
• 2. Get Carter (4:24)
• 3. Gravity of the Situation (1:20)
• 4. Thark Side of Barsoom (2:55)
• 5. Sab Than Pursues the Princess (5:33)
• 6. The Temple of Issus (3:24)
• 7. Zodanga Happened (4:01)
• 8. The Blue Light Special (4:11)
• 9. Carter They Come, Carter They Fall (3:54)
• 10. A Change of Heart (3:03)
• 11. A Thern Warning (4:03)
• 12. The Second Biggest Apes I've Seen This Month (2:35)
• 13. The Right of Challenge (2:22)
• 14. The Prize is Barsoom (4:28)
• 15. The Fight for Helium (4:32)
• 16. Not Quite Finished (2:05)
• 17. Thernabout (1:18)
• 18. Ten Bitter Years (3:11)
• 19. John Carter of Mars (8:53)

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes a list of performers and short notes about the score from the composer and director.
Copyright © 2012-2015, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from John Carter are Copyright © 2012, Walt Disney Records and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 4/2/12 (and not updated significantly since).
Reviews Preload Scoreboard decoration Ratings Preload Composers Preload Awards Preload Home Preload Search Preload