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The Karate Kid
(2010)
Album Cover Art
Composed, Co-Orchestrated, Conducted, and Co-Produced by:

Co-Orchestrated by:
J.A.C. Redford

Performed by:
The Hollywood Studio Symphony

Co-Produced by:
Simon Rhodes
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Madison Gate Records
(June 15th, 2010)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release, available only via digital download and Amazon.com's CD-R on demand service.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
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ALSO SEE




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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you are consistently pleased with James Horner's familiar, wholesome character scores, especially those that range from intimate piano solos to full ensemble grandeur.

Avoid it... if you expect something other than a straight extension of the thematic material from Avatar, a striking and disappointing reaffirmation of Horner's bizarre obsession with recycling his ideas from prior scores.
Review Icon
EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,151
WRITTEN 6/29/10
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Horner
Horner
The Karate Kid: (James Horner) The studios will never let a few fatal fallacies of logic stand in the way of immense profits, regardless of how offensive or stupid the concept or a rebooted concept may be. The 1984 smash hit The Karate Kid was responsible for a rush of popularity for karate across the world, though despite the 2010 remake's use of the name to generate familiar interest, Will Smith's blatant production vehicle for his son changes the location of the protagonist's troubles from Los Angeles to China and replaces karate with kung fu. Thus, asserting in the title that young Jaden Smith is the "karate kid" is not only misleading, but insulting to karate. Nevertheless, Sony's resurrection of The Karate Kid trounced 20th Century Fox's like-minded 80's remake of The A-Team at the box office and blasted past the $100 million mark so quickly that a sequel was immediately put into the planning stages. Critical reactions to The Karate Kid were punctuated not only by fallacy of the title, but also the young ages of the children in the film. Despite these questions of authenticity, however, the basic premise of the 1984 classic remains intact, and the boy must learn from Jackie Chan the physical and mental ability to defeat the clan of bullying kids in his new city. The music for 2010's The Karate Kid hasn't been particularly well coordinated, with most of the attention going to the Justin Bieber hip hop single "Never Say Never" that has been advertised as the film's official song and debuted in the top 40 on the American Billboard charts. Originally slated to write the score was Atli Orvarsson, one of the many Hans Zimmer associates to emerge from the Remote Control clone factory, though he was reportedly dismissed without having recorded any material for the film. His replacement was none other than veteran James Horner, fresh off of his monumental success for Avatar. Horner's involvement came as quite a surprise to the film score community given that the composer typically does not take this kind of mainstream assignment any longer. Some argued that Bill Conti should be hired to continue his legacy in the franchise (his music for the original four films spanned ten years and multiple casts and crews), though the dreams of lingering Conti enthusiasts were not to become a reality.



Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
552 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3.23 Stars
***** 119 5 Stars
**** 135 4 Stars
*** 133 3 Stars
** 88 2 Stars
* 77 1 Stars
  (View results for all titles)

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COMMENTS
7 TOTAL COMMENTS
Read All Start New Thread Search Comments
Great Job!   Expand >>
Trevor - July 4, 2010, at 1:42 p.m.
2 comments  (1610 views)
Newest: July 11, 2010, at 10:27 a.m. by
ZooMom
Sounds like "The New World"   Expand >>
Sam - July 2, 2010, at 9:21 p.m.
2 comments  (1609 views)
Newest: July 20, 2010, at 11:42 a.m. by
Hubs
Horner should clone himself.   Expand >>
IndianaSchwartz - June 30, 2010, at 7:10 p.m.
3 comments  (1494 views)
Newest: July 1, 2010, at 4:17 p.m. by
Matt S.
More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 64:12
• 1. Leaving Detroit (2:55)
• 2. Looking for Mr. Han (1:29)
• 3. Kung Fu Heaven (1:19)
• 4. I Want to Go Home/The Forbidden City (4:29)
• 5. The Lunchroom (2:29)
• 6. Backstreet Beating (3:34)
• 7. Han's Kung Fu (1:39)
• 8. Ancient Chinese Medicine (1:26)
• 9. Beijing Valentine (1:34)
• 10. Mei Ying's Kiss (3:23)
• 11. Jacket On, Jacket Off (2:32)
• 12. Journey to the Spiritual Mountain (8:49)
• 13. Hard Training (1:21)
• 14. All Work and No Play (1:41)
• 15. From Master to Student to Master (10:33)
• 16. Dre's Gift and Apology (3:07)
• 17. Tournament Time (5:09)
• 18. Final Contest (6:48)

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes a list of performers, but no extra information about the score or film. The back cover explicitly states that the product does not include the Justin Bieber song. The CD-R packaging looks professional, but it has a terrible odor on the inside of the insert upon first opening.
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The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from The Karate Kid are Copyright © 2010, Madison Gate Records and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 6/29/10 (and not updated significantly since).
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