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The Last Castle
(2001)
Album Cover Art
Composed, Conducted, and Produced by:

Orchestrated by:
Mark McKenzie
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LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Decca Records
(October 16th, 2001)
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ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if your heart could be stirred by the solemn and defiant merging of the complexly vengeful Rambo scores with echoes of trumpet performances from Patton.

Avoid it... if, despite the impressive tribute recording to the victims of September 11th, 2001, your primary interest in the score is based on originality in construct and instrumentation.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #691
WRITTEN 10/17/01, REVISED 1/25/09
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Goldsmith
Goldsmith
The Last Castle: (Jerry Goldsmith) In a rare return to acting without directing at the same time, Robert Redford places himself in the role of a decorated American general who refuses to obey an executive order and is thus sent to a military prison called "the castle." His stubborn will to resist the unreasonable actions of the prison's warden in The Last Castle earn him the respect of the men, and only through his sacrifice in an uprising can he bring proper justice to its confines. The Rod Lurie film was undoubtedly too long in running time, dragging its story out for over two hours and hitting the patriotism and redemption buttons too frequently. While making use of a few blues songs during that time, The Last Castle was among the last five scores written and recorded by the legendary Jerry Goldsmith, taking advantage of the composer's rich history of uplifting patriotic works. Forgotten by some listeners in the composer's late string of ethnically powerful action and solemn mystery scores was the fact that Goldsmith was very capable of assembling a rousing, country-first score for brass and percussion. Thirty years prior, his military marches for Patton and MacArthur burst into movie music history, establishing Goldsmith as an artist with a mastery of pompous and even arrogant military music. That style of writing from Goldsmith would turn bittersweet in his three Rambo scores, producing a haunting theme for a fallen soldier that remains atop his resume. In the 1990's, Goldsmith's military-related work had more of a swashbuckling edge, with scores such as Air Force One and Executive Decision melding patriotism with all out adventure. All of the aforementioned scores are dominated by lead performances by brass instruments, with bold themes that often graced the composer's compilations and concerts. In The Last Castle, as the gritty, court-martialed general leads his insurrection, Goldsmith returns to emotional territory that is closest in relation to the complexly vengeful Rambo scores, but with a prominent role for trumpet and rolling motif usage that will very obviously remind even mainstream listeners of Patton.



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VIEWER RATINGS
1,663 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3.29 Stars
***** 285 5 Stars
**** 421 4 Stars
*** 588 3 Stars
** 242 2 Stars
* 127 1 Stars
  (View results for all titles)

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COMMENTS
16 TOTAL COMMENTS
Read All Start New Thread Search Comments
Thank you for the insightful reviews, Filmtracks
Kyle Scott - August 23, 2002, at 6:48 p.m.
1 comment  (1789 views)
A Jerry quickie?
Renardclochard - July 9, 2002, at 12:39 p.m.
1 comment  (2084 views)
September 11, 2001 - used by MSNBC?   Expand >>
Jan B. - November 19, 2001, at 12:31 p.m.
2 comments  (2660 views)
Newest: March 30, 2002, at 1:05 p.m. by
Steve
Trailer Music   Expand >>
JnB - November 13, 2001, at 6:29 p.m.
2 comments  (2112 views)
Newest: November 18, 2001, at 2:40 a.m. by
Levente Benedek
Academy nomination? Can he have it?
Levente Benedek - November 9, 2001, at 11:43 a.m.
1 comment  (1571 views)
Castle's sound distortion
Robert Ritchie - November 1, 2001, at 4:31 p.m.
1 comment  (1703 views)
More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 43:06
• 1. The Castle (1:32)
• 2. Irwin Arrives (2:18)
• 3. The Rock Pile (5:03)
• 4. Get Behind the Mule - performed by John Hammond (5:54)
• 5. Let's Go Ladies (2:40)
• 6. Full Alert (2:54)
• 7. Military Justice (2:22)
• 8. The Count Down (2:20)
• 9. Hold Them (1:52)
• 10. Taking Command (3:36)
• 11. The Flag (5:54)
• 12. September 11, 2001 - Theme from The Last Castle (2:46)
• 13. Chiseled in Stone - performed by Dean Hall (3:48)

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert contains an interesting recollection by the director, Rod Lurie, about the process of obtaining Goldsmith's services, as well as his vaulted opinion of the composer. He finishes by describing his reaction to the title theme:

    "Twenty-four notes. All in C minor.
    Twenty-four notes that have haunted me ever since.
    Twenty-four notes that left me in tears.
    Twenty-four notes that are a gift to soldiers; to sailors; to Americans.
    Twenty-four notes that, I think, will help to cement Jerry Goldsmith as the maestro of our time."

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The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from The Last Castle are Copyright © 2001, Decca Records and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 10/17/01 and last updated 1/25/09.
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