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The Meg
(2018)
Album Cover Art
Composed, Conducted, and Produced by:

Orchestrated by:
Alastair King

Additional Music by:
Stephanie Economou
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LABEL & RELEASE DATE
WaterTower Music
(August 3rd, 2018)
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ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Digital-only commercial release with no high-resolution option.
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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you approach this marginally entertaining score with lowered expectations, Harry Gregson-Williams supplying some surprisingly engaging ethnicity and tonality to this otherwise formula equation.

Avoid it... if you demand a monster or superhero-worthy power anthem to accompany the story's battle of oversized character egos, the themes of this score sufficient and at times impressive but not leaving a lasting impact.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,913
WRITTEN 10/26/18
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Gregson-<br>Williams
Gregson-
Williams
The Meg: (Harry Gregson-Williams) There's only so much a movie can accomplish with a shark as its villain (until the day sharks can fly!), and many of the alternatives already spoken for on the big screen, 2018's The Meg, the highly sought adaptation of the studio-bait novel, decided to make the beast really, really big. With a bit of prehistoric mythos owing to Japanese monster films, the topic postulates that accidental human activity deep in the Western Pacific Ocean (in this case, the attempted rescue of a floundering submarine) releases the largest shark ever suspected of existing into the open waters. Naturally, it battles the pesky human researchers it encounters and eventually makes its way to a beach where vacationing civilians await their sorry fate. Ball-busting action star Jason Statham applies his fists symbolically to the monster, of course, allowing for solid box office performance. The problem with The Meg, however, is that it's not scary or gory enough to satisfy adults and too frightening for children, so it's ultimately not particularly satisfying or memorable for anyone. Any shark-related film in which too many minor characters survive is destined for disappointment, and a monster of Megalodon size needs to consume more amusing targets than shown. Director Jon Turteltaub was realistic about one aspect of his production, though, and that was the original score. Having collaborated with Hans Zimmer and associates throughout his career, he turned to early Zimmer enterprises graduate Harry Gregson-Williams for The Meg, and he made it clear to the composer that no emulation of John Williams' famous Jaws music was to be attempted. This is, after all, more of a monster action flick than a straight horror one, and Gregson-Williams approached it as such. While the orchestral and synthetic blend that the veteran uses for this occasion is pretty much rendered as expected, he does incorporate more than a small touch of Chinese sensibility into his equation. This ethnic influence provides most of the score's attractive moments and owes to the film's location (a Chinese resort is the location of the attack late in the film) and its Chinese production backers. The composer's merging of Eastern woodwinds and percussion with bass-heavy orchestra and electronics serves well enough; the resulting action blend resorts to typical, thrashing action of a synthetic tilt in some passages but manages to infuse enough character into the subject to keep the score more interesting than Gregson-Williams' concurrent and rather pointless The Equalizer 2.



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VIEWER RATINGS
90 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 2.81 Stars
***** 8 5 Stars
**** 18 4 Stars
*** 28 3 Stars
** 21 2 Stars
* 15 1 Stars
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Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS
Total Time: 51:04
• 1. Sub Disaster (4:16)
• 2. Mana One (1:32)
• 3. A New World (4:57)
• 4. Jonas Descends (3:12)
• 5. Prehistoric Species (2:41)
• 6. Toshi's Sacrifice (2:33)
• 7. Non-Extinct (1:46)
• 8. Meiying Explores (2:24)
• 9. Even the Score (2:10)
• 10. Tracker (2:42)
• 11. Shark Cage (3:52)
• 12. You Saved Me (0:56)
• 13. Dr. Zhang (2:35)
• 14. We Have a Plan (1:20)
• 15. Pippin (0:43)
• 16. Beach Attack (2:48)
• 17. Jonas vs Meg (5:56)
• 18. To Our Friends (4:41)

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NOTES AND QUOTES
No packaging exists from the label for this album.
Copyright © 2018, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from The Meg are Copyright © 2018, WaterTower Music and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 10/26/18 (and not updated significantly since).
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