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The Name of the Rose
(1986)
Album Cover Art
1986 Virgin (French)
1986 Teldec (German)
Album 2 Cover Art
1991 PDI (Spanish)
Album 3 Cover Art
Composed, Conducted, Performed, and Produced by:
Labels Icon
LABELS & RELEASE DATES
Virgin (French)
Teldec (German)
(1986)

PDI (Spanish)
(1991)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
No American release has ever existed for this title. A pair of 1986 albums from France and Germany were joined by a Spanish re-issue in 1991; all of these products contain the same music but utilize different cover art.
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None.
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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... only if you have specifically appreciated James Horner's mostly electronic and somber score in context and would be satisfied with only a few late performances of the composer's somewhat pretty (though still morbid), synth-string primary theme.

Avoid it... if you find a synthetic and very understated approach to a murder mystery in a 14th Century Italian monastery to be not only incredibly dull, but curiously misdirected as well.
Review Icon
EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,399
WRITTEN 8/20/09
Horner
Horner
The Name of the Rose: (James Horner) The 1986 European production of The Name of the Rose helmed by Jean-Jacques Annaud went largely unnoticed in the United States despite its lead star, likely testimony to the fact that the film's 14th-Century, religiously-embroiled plot had little appeal to American sensibilities. A bare-headed Sean Connery plays William of Baskerville, a Franciscan monk trying to solve a murder mystery in a 1327 Benedictine Abbey before more irrational minds in the Church call upon a Holy Inquisitor (F. Murray Abraham) to use less scientific means of accusing and punishing a supposed killer. The Northern Italian setting and its monastery are gloomy locations for the topic of the mystery, shot mostly with extremely dark shades and using the grim castle-like structure as its own character. The pursuit of the murder is seen through the frustrating lens of illogical pious behavior, though that didn't stop Annaud from exhibiting some nudity in a popular sex scene involving Christian Slater as William's young assistant. By no means a particularly memorable film, The Name of the Rose is still solid entertainment, relying upon the performances by the two older leads to carry the mystery to its thoughtful conclusion. Composer James Horner was already becoming a mainstream name by 1986, with several high profile projects already under his belt. In the 1980's (and again sporadically in the 2000's), the composer experimented with almost completely synthetic scores, sometimes by necessity and other times for impact. One of the composer's more curious synthetic scores indeed belongs to The Name of the Rose, a production that on the surface does not seem to suggest that such an approach would be viable. There is a fair amount of source material that better addresses popular expectations of what one should hear when viewing scenes within a 14th Century monastery, and Horner assisted in the recording of three specific traditional choral pieces (with a soloist and school ensemble, seemingly) that match the oppressive atmosphere of the story. This music translates into the most varied and easily accessible portion of the many European album releases of the soundtrack for The Name of the Rose, though even in these portions it's difficult to find much more than solemn beauty of a highly restrained character. As for Horner's original contribution, there is no doubt that the composer sought to accentuate the morbid ambience of a murder mystery first and cater to the period and locale second. The result is unfortunately a very pedestrian and cold effort.



Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
122 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 2.72 Stars
***** 24 5 Stars
**** 17 4 Stars
*** 20 3 Stars
** 24 2 Stars
* 37 1 Stars
  (View results for all titles)

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COMMENTS
5 TOTAL COMMENTS
Read All Start New Thread Search Comments
Review
Joel - May 26, 2013, at 1:57 p.m.
1 comment  (636 views)
It helps to listen to it at night
Richard Kleiner - November 5, 2010, at 4:13 p.m.
1 comment  (925 views)
rubbish review
Roger - August 21, 2010, at 11:38 p.m.
1 comment  (994 views)
Re: Der Name Der Rose   Expand >>
orion_mk3 - September 12, 2009, at 1:57 p.m.
2 comments  (1719 views)
Newest: September 12, 2009, at 2:34 p.m. by
John
More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
All Albums Tracks   ▼Total Time: 41:57
• 1. Main Titles (3:01)
• 2. Beata Viscera** (2:19)
• 3. First Recognition (2:28)
• 4. The Lesson (4:18)
• 5. Kyrie* (2:22)
• 6. The Scriptorium (3:52)
• 7. Veni Sancte Spiritus* (3:13)
• 8. The Confession (3:10)
• 9. Flashbacks (2:05)
• 10. The Discovery (2:28)
• 11. Betrayed (2:56)
• 12. Epilogue (6:06)
• 13. End Titles (3:12)
* traditional, performed by The Choir School Maria Schutz
** traditional, performed by Charles Brett

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The various inserts include no extra information about the score or film, but some do contain a welcome screenshot of nudity from the film.
Copyright © 2009-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from The Name of the Rose are Copyright © 1986, 1991, Virgin (French) Teldec (German), PDI (Spanish) and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 8/20/09 (and not updated significantly since).
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