SUPPORT FILMTRACKS! CLICK HERE FIRST:
Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk
iTunes (U.S.)
Amazon.ca
Amazon.fr
eBay (U.S.)
Amazon.de
Amazon.es
Half.com
Glisten Effect
Editorial Reviews
Scoreboard Forum
Viewer Ratings
Composers
Awards
   NEWEST MAJOR REVIEWS:
     1. Transformers: Last Knight
    2. Cars 3
   3. The Mummy
  4. Wonder Woman
 5. POTC: Dead Men Tell No Tales
6. Alien: Covenant


   CURRENT BEST-SELLING SCORES:
       1. Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
      2. Fantastic Beasts/Find Them
     3. Willow
    4. The Ghost and the Darkness
   5. An American Tail
  6. The Wind and the Lion
 7. Doctor Strange
8. 10 Cloverfield Lane
   CURRENT MOST POPULAR REVIEWS:
         1. Star Wars: Force Awakens
        2. E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
       3. Titanic
      4. Avatar
     5. Nineteen Eighty-Four
    6. Gladiator
   7. Star Wars: A New Hope
  8. Animal Farm
 9. LOTR: Fellowship of the Ring
10. Harry Potter: Sorcerer's Stone
Home Page
Panic Room
(2002)
Album Cover Art
Composed, Orchestrated, Conducted, and Produced by:
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Varèse Sarabande
(April 16th, 2002)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
Also See Icon
ALSO SEE




Decorative Nonsense
PRINTER FRIENDLY VIEW
(inverts site colors)




   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you still have a soft spot for Howard Shore's tense, brooding thrillers, in which the orchestral ensemble is used as a blunt tool for rumbling ambience for much of the scores' duration.

Avoid it... if a mostly themeless, gut-wrenching underscore of thirty unmemorable minutes on album isn't your cup of tea.
Review Icon
EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,221
WRITTEN 6/16/03, REVISED 2/18/09
Shopping Icon
BUY IT



Shore
Shore
Panic Room: (Howard Shore) Let's start by asking this question: if you're looking at purchasing a home that comes with a panic room, isn't that some kind of indication that you're moving into the wrong neighborhood? A novelty item that was strangely becoming popular in upscale homes at the turn of the century, a panic room was the defining subject of the 2002 thriller named, not surprisingly, Panic Room. David Fincher's suburban tale pits a homeowner (Jodie Foster with just enough skin showing to attract more fantasizing criminals) and her daughter against a gang of ruthless burglars. The tension is a high as it can be, with the threat extending from the sexual domain all the way to one of life threatening proportions. Needless to say, it's an unpleasant concept for a film in every regard. It's also the kind of production for which an orchestral score could serve its duty as a footnote for whatever composer was involved, though the footnote in this case is more interesting than in most other cases. The continuing collaboration between Fincher and Howard Shore meant that Panic Room was sandwiched in between the first two scores for Peter Jackson's trilogy of The Lord of the Rings, for which Shore was in the process of winning an Oscar when he recorded Panic Room. The genre of films that these two bring to life are trademark modern thrillers, with The Game and Seven offering bleak scores for troubling films. The amount of psychological trauma that is often inflicted upon the viewer in these productions is something that Shore seems to be able to understand and perpetuate, because the composer has had a knack for bucking Hollywood trends and providing equally disturbing music for these projects. Whereas a composer like Jerry Goldsmith often preferred to score his horror assignments of the time with a more extroverted stylistic and thematic identity, Shore was content to travel closer to the Bernard Herrmann route, occasionally using the orchestra like a blunt tool with which to draw out the primordial emotions of the audience by making an underscore that sounds more like noise rather than music. If not for its accomplished textures, the work would indeed exist in the realm of ambient sound design. Shore specifically responds to the gloomy suspense of Panic Room with an equally abrasive, difficult, and tense orchestral score that shatters whatever comfort you might think exists in suburban lifestyles.



Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
191 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 2.68 Stars
***** 29 5 Stars
**** 33 4 Stars
*** 34 3 Stars
** 39 2 Stars
* 56 1 Stars
  (View results for all titles)

Comments Icon
COMMENTS
9 TOTAL COMMENTS
Read All Start New Thread Search Comments
Brass Section (Hollywood Studio Symphony)
N.R.Q. - June 4, 2007, at 7:48 a.m.
1 comment  (1582 views)
Aww ...
Panic Room Fan - May 19, 2006, at 9:58 a.m.
1 comment  (1814 views)
CD Length explaination from Varese   Expand >>
Fraley - October 30, 2003, at 11:16 a.m.
2 comments  (2928 views)
Newest: July 6, 2006, at 2:41 a.m. by
Chad Wichterman
30 minutes!?   Expand >>
Miz - October 29, 2003, at 1:47 p.m.
5 comments  (3804 views)
Newest: July 6, 2006, at 2:45 a.m. by
Chad Wichterman
More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 30:09
• 1. Main Title (2:09)
• 2. Caution - Flammable (4:51)
• 3. Working Elevator (4:25)
• 4. Fourth Floor Hallway (3:26)
• 5. Locking Us In (3:16)
• 6. Castle Keep (2:37)
• 7. What We Want is In That Room (3:07)
• 8. Zone 19 Disabled (3:18)
• 9. A Very Emotional Property (3:01)

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes a list of performers, but no extra information about the score or film.
Copyright © 2003-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from Panic Room are Copyright © 2002, Varèse Sarabande and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 6/16/03 and last updated 2/18/09.
Reviews Preload Scoreboard decoration Ratings Preload Composers Preload Awards Preload Home Preload Search Preload