SUPPORT FILMTRACKS! CLICK HERE FIRST:
Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk
iTunes (U.S.)
Amazon.ca
Amazon.fr
eBay (U.S.)
Amazon.de
Amazon.es
Half.com
Glisten Effect
Editorial Reviews
Scoreboard Forum
Viewer Ratings
Composers
Awards
   NEWEST MAJOR REVIEWS:
     1. Transformers: Last Knight
    2. Cars 3
   3. The Mummy
  4. Wonder Woman
 5. POTC: Dead Men Tell No Tales
6. Alien: Covenant


   CURRENT BEST-SELLING SCORES:
       1. Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
      2. Fantastic Beasts/Find Them
     3. Willow
    4. The Ghost and the Darkness
   5. An American Tail
  6. The Wind and the Lion
 7. Doctor Strange
8. 10 Cloverfield Lane
   CURRENT MOST POPULAR REVIEWS:
         1. Star Wars: Force Awakens
        2. E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
       3. Titanic
      4. Avatar
     5. Nineteen Eighty-Four
    6. Gladiator
   7. Star Wars: A New Hope
  8. Animal Farm
 9. LOTR: Fellowship of the Ring
10. Harry Potter: Sorcerer's Stone
Home Page
The Postman
(1997)
Album Cover Art
Composed, Co-Orchestrated, and Produced by:

Conducted by:
Artie Kane
Paul Salamunovich

Co-Orchestrated by:
Brad Dechter
Jeff Atmajian
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Warner Bros. Records
(December 23rd, 1997)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
Also See Icon
ALSO SEE




Decorative Nonsense
PRINTER FRIENDLY VIEW
(inverts site colors)





   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you have always enjoyed James Newton Howard's general adventure and fantasy material on a large scale, because The Postman was something of a template for many similar scores to follow from the composer.

Avoid it... if you seek unique themes, instrumental applications, or other techniques in what is essentially a pleasantly generic entry for Howard in the genre.
Review Icon
EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,671
WRITTEN 7/16/10
Shopping Icon
BUY IT



Howard
Howard
The Postman: (James Newton Howard) The sudden decline of Kevin Costner's star power in the late 1990's was a subject of much banter and ridicule, his pair of monumental flops of the era, Waterworld and The Postman, both produced by their lead actor. For Costner, the 1997 post-apocalyptic film The Postman was the first directorial venture since Dances With Wolves, and it came at a dead period in his career that signaled the end of his marketability. Costing $80 million to make and only generating $18 million in return, The Postman was universally mocked by critics as a vehicle for Costner's ego, a description not aided by the fact that the story tells of humanity in the future erecting and admiring a large statue of his likeness. He plays a nomad in America's not so distant future, a desolate place due to a global societal meltdown and suggested nuclear winter. Local fascist militias battle with stubborn communities of the Northwest, and the nomad escapes enlistment in the militia and somewhat accidentally starts a rumor that he is a postal carrier for America's restored government, a lie that spawns a myth that causes the people of the region to start their own mail services and connect the states from California to Washington. Among the only lasting unique distinctions for The Postman is the fact that it swept every category in which it was nominated at the Razzie awards for the worst of cinema. As expected, Costner hired James Newton Howard to provide the score for the picture, receiving a result not substantially different from Waterworld. In both cases, the composer overachieved when considering the quality of Costner's films, the music engagingly melodic with rich orchestral textures. For The Postman, a collection of light country and folk songs written by Jono Manson and John Coinman supplemented Howard's score, and Costner would choose to stroke his ego even further by performing a duet with Amy Grant for the highlighted song of the production. The entire package actually works reasonable well, with no part of the score or songs offensive to the ears or too incongruent with each other to handle. The Grant and Costner song ("You Didn't Have to Be So Nice") is the best of the batch, the actor surprisingly sufficient in a secondary, backup role for Grant. The album devotes its entire second half to the sung material, and none of it directly correlates its tunes with Howard's far more interesting score, which itself provides most of the album's running time.



Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
159 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3.27 Stars
***** 33 5 Stars
**** 38 4 Stars
*** 43 3 Stars
** 29 2 Stars
* 16 1 Stars
  (View results for all titles)

Comments Icon
COMMENTS
0 TOTAL COMMENTS
Read All Start New Thread Search Comments


No Comments

More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 73:36
• 1. Main Titles (2:21)
• 2. Shelter in the Storm (6:23)
• 3. The Belly of the Beast (6:49)
• 4. General Bethlehem (6:55)
• 5. Abby Comes Calling (10:49)
• 6. The Restored United States (6:43)
• 7. The Postman (9:50)
• 8. Almost Home - performed by Jono Manson (3:59)
• 9. It Will Happen Naturally - performed by Jono Manson (2:18)
• 10. The Next Big Thing - performed by Jono Manson (2:19)
• 11. This Perfect World - performed by John Coinman (3:38)
• 12. Once This Was the Promised Land - performed by John Coinman (2:06)
• 13. I Miss My Radio - performed by Jono Manson and John Coinman (2:42)
• 14. Come and Get Your Love - performed by John Coinman (3:06)
• 15. You Didn't Have to Be So Nice - performed by Amy Grant and Kevin Costner (3:38)

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert contains extensive credits and a production photo of Howard with some of the musicians, but no extra information about the score or film.
Copyright © 2010-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from The Postman are Copyright © 1997, Warner Bros. Records and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 7/16/10 (and not updated significantly since).
Reviews Preload Scoreboard decoration Ratings Preload Composers Preload Awards Preload Home Preload Search Preload