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Prometheus
(2012)
Album Cover Art
Composed and Produced by:
Marc Streitenfeld

Orchestrated and Conducted by:
Ben Foster

Additional Music by:
Harry Gregson-Williams
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Sony Classical
(June 12th, 2012)
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ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
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AWARDS
None.
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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you're an enthusiast of the music for the Alien franchise and can forgive Marc Streitenfeld for creating something of a tribute to his predecessors while cranking up the organically melodramatic aspect of the concept.

Avoid it... if you expect the four new themes in this score to develop into a clear narrative, a task made difficult by the intrusion of significant and challenging sound design into the mix for the suspense and horror sequences.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #913
WRITTEN 6/10/12
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Streitenfeld
Streitenfeld
Gregson-<br>Williams
Gregson-
Williams
Prometheus: (Marc Streitenfeld/Harry Gregson-Williams) At war in director Ridley Scott's 2012 visual stunner Prometheus are audience expectations for neatly-wrapped explanations of a classic old story and the filmmakers' desire to tantalize those audiences by raising more questions than they answer. The franchise that followed the 1979 Scott movie Alien never explained many of the original story's mysteries, and in the early 2000's, Scott and Aliens director James Cameron sought to explore a prequel that would expand upon the fascinating scenes in Alien that continued to baffle with their origins. While the intrusion of the Predator franchise into the scene ultimately drove Cameron away, Scott revisited the Alien concept in his much revised story for Prometheus, setting the stage for the events later seen in Alien without actually establishing a narrative that directly flows into the 1979 film (defying the format of The Thing prequel in 2011). The famous scene of the giant, dead "space jockey" creature in Alien inspires much of Prometheus, though Scott explores existential and mythological territory (akin to Blade Runner) surrounding that race's activities in the universe. These "engineers" seem not only to be responsible for the creation of the human race, but also the genetic experimentation that leads to the establishment of the feared "alien" race of unknown purpose. Whether the classic aliens are meant as a biological weapon specifically bred to wipe out humanity is as much a mystery as the engineers' role in creating humans in the first place. A strong feminine hero, a somewhat creepy android, and a whole lot of gruesome killings are showcased in typical Scott fashion, utilizing visuals that were almost universally praised by critics. Response to Prometheus was mixed due to the filmmakers' decision to leave the door open for a direct sequel rather than explicitly explain the involvement of the specific engineer in the context of Alien. Musically speaking, the Alien franchise has never enjoyed any remote level of musical consistency through its decades of rotating between directors and composers. While the soundtrack for each individual entry has its own merits, the general approach to all of these entries has varied wildly since Jerry Goldsmith's first score in 1979. Perhaps one of the most interesting developments in Prometheus is the choice to pay homage to several of the previous franchise scores' themes and techniques rather than blaze an entirely new trail.

Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
538 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3.03 Stars
***** 83 5 Stars
**** 129 4 Stars
*** 130 3 Stars
** 116 2 Stars
* 80 1 Stars
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COMMENTS
10 TOTAL COMMENTS
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Modern Music's place in film music   Expand >>
Hyun21K - July 17, 2012, at 1:40 p.m.
2 comments  (931 views)
Newest: January 30, 2013, at 5:26 a.m.by Bernardo
Music Muse Reviews "Prometheus" by Marc Streteinfeld
KK - June 29, 2012, at 9:45 p.m.
1 comment  (914 views)
Chronological Order?
Joel A. Griswell - June 13, 2012, at 4:47 a.m.
1 comment  (1501 views)
Incompetent reviewer writes pathetic review   Expand >>
angry reader - June 11, 2012, at 9:08 a.m.
6 comments  (1723 views)
Newest: June 19, 2012, at 2:45 a.m.by paolo
More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 56:54
• 1. A Planet (2:37)
• 2. Going In (2:03)
• 3. Engineers (2:29)
• 4. Life* (2:30)
• 5. Weyland (2:04)
• 6. Discovery (2:32)
• 7. Not Human (1:49)
• 8. Too Close (3:20)
• 9. Try Harder (2:03)
• 10. David (3:00)
• 11. Hammerpede (2:42)
• 12. We Were Right* (2:42)
• 13. Earth (2:35)
• 14. Infected (1:56)
• 15. Hyper Sleep (2:01)
• 16. Small Beginnings (2:11)
• 17. Hello Mommy (2:04)
• 18. Friend From the Past** (1:14)
• 19. Dazed (4:29)
• 20. Space Jockey (1:29)
• 21. Collision (3:05)
• 22. Debris (0:44)
• 23. Planting the Seed (1:35)
• 24. Invitation (2:16)
• 25. Birth (1:24)
* composed by Harry Gregson-Williams
** contains music composed by Jerry Goldsmith

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes no extra information about the score or film. The actual credits and thank you section of that insert does not recognize Harry Gregson-Williams in any way.
Copyright © 2012-2015, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from Prometheus are Copyright © 2012, Sony Classical and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 6/10/12 (and not updated significantly since).
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