SUPPORT FILMTRACKS! CLICK HERE FIRST:
Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk
iTunes (U.S.)
Amazon.ca
Amazon.fr
eBay (U.S.)
Amazon.de
Amazon.es
Half.com
Glisten Effect
Editorial Reviews
Scoreboard Forum
Viewer Ratings
Composers
Awards
   NEWEST MAJOR REVIEWS:
     1. Transformers: Last Knight
    2. Cars 3
   3. The Mummy
  4. Wonder Woman
 5. POTC: Dead Men Tell No Tales
6. Alien: Covenant


   CURRENT BEST-SELLING SCORES:
       1. Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
      2. Fantastic Beasts/Find Them
     3. Willow
    4. The Ghost and the Darkness
   5. An American Tail
  6. The Wind and the Lion
 7. Doctor Strange
8. 10 Cloverfield Lane
   CURRENT MOST POPULAR REVIEWS:
         1. Star Wars: Force Awakens
        2. E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
       3. Titanic
      4. Avatar
     5. Nineteen Eighty-Four
    6. Gladiator
   7. Star Wars: A New Hope
  8. Animal Farm
 9. LOTR: Fellowship of the Ring
10. Harry Potter: Sorcerer's Stone
Home Page
Ransom
(1996)
Album Cover Art
Composed, Co-Orchestrated, Conducted, and Produced by:

Additional Music by:
Billy Corgan

Co-Orchestrated by:
David Slonaker
Don Davis
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Hollywood Records
(November 5th, 1996)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
Also See Icon
ALSO SEE




Decorative Nonsense
PRINTER FRIENDLY VIEW
(inverts site colors)




   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... only if you're a Smashing Pumpkins fan and are seeking Billy Corgan's 25 minutes of rocking, bone-headed score on the album.

Avoid it... if re-hashed James Horner ideas lifted directly from a plethora of other scores in his past would simply irritate you, not to mention the grossly disparate and painfully insufferable music from Corgan.
Review Icon
EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #748
WRITTEN 11/10/96, REVISED 11/9/11
Shopping Icon
BUY IT



Horner
Horner
Ransom: (James Horner/Billy Corgan) Based on the same screenplay by Richard Price and Alexander Ignon that inspired the 1956 Glenn Ford movie of the same name, Ron Howard's Ransom of late 1996 places the director in exactly the genre at which he excels the most: group tension. The film was somewhat of a success, with the script perhaps needing two or three fewer loose ends, and Mel Gibson's performance is often credited for Ransom's appeal. The story offered the angry actor the opportunity to delve in a role that suits him best, seeking answers in an agitated state and ultimately trying to take the law into his own hands. The post-production of the movie wasn't free from hiccups, and one late-arriving piece of news was the rejection of composer Howard Shore's score for the film. Howard turned to previously scheduled collaborator James Horner with only a little over two weeks to spare until the score had to be dubbed into the film. At least Horner didn't go "Troy" on Shore's work and publicly trash the composer's capabilities in the industry. Making the situation for Ransom even muddier, though, was the studio's hiring of Billy Corgan of the Smashing Pumpkins rock band to write and perform music for several cues throughout the film as well. Given Shore's substantial work in the genre of urban thrillers, it's difficult to understand how his music eventually became an obvious emergency job by Horner, not to mention some replacement by the completely irrelevant music of Corgan. No matter who wrote the score, the script of Ransom involved much introversion while the two main stars of the plot play their intellectual game of cat and mouse. It's a "thinking man's suspense score," with occasional explosive bursts of energy as the hero and villain meet a few times under duress. From Horner, the resulting score is still mostly a drawn-out exercise in meandering ambience, while Corban's music fails to make any sense whatsoever and deserves practically no credit in either this review or the film itself. On Horner's part, it's easy to get the impression that Howard had tracked several cues from the composer's previous works into Ransom in an attempt to rectify the direction the film had seemed to take with Shore's music. What the listener hears in the end is a Horner score that is little more than easily identifiable pieces of his music from previous works strung together to supply a make-shift soundtrack for Ransom.



Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
152 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 2.51 Stars
***** 17 5 Stars
**** 21 4 Stars
*** 31 3 Stars
** 37 2 Stars
* 46 1 Stars
  (View results for all titles)

Comments Icon
COMMENTS
3 TOTAL COMMENTS
Read All Start New Thread Search Comments
Ransom Formula
Bruno Costa - November 18, 2010, at 4:38 a.m.
1 comment  (1105 views)
If Horner would take some of the drugs that Corgan uses...   Expand >>
Julio Gomez - May 28, 2005, at 2:58 p.m.
2 comments  (3540 views)
Newest: August 24, 2005, at 4:13 p.m. by
Person
More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 72:32
• 1. The Kidnapping (4:34)
• 2. Delivering the Ransom (12:04)
• 3. The Quarry (4:21)
• 4. A Two Million Dollar Bounty (4:23)
• 5. Parallel Stories (2:35)
• 6. A Fatal Mistake (4:51)
• 7. A Dark Reunion (3:08)
• 8. The Payoff/End Credits (12:21)
• 9. Rats* (3:06)
• 10. Worms* (4:17)
• 11. Spiders* (3:34)
• 12. Lizards* (3:11)
• 13. Worms, Part 2* (4:39)
• 14. Squirrels with Tails* (5:21)
* written and performed by Smashing Pumpkins' Billy Corgan

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes no extra information about the score or film.
Copyright © 1996-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from Ransom are Copyright © 1996, Hollywood Records and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 11/10/96 and last updated 11/9/11.
Reviews Preload Scoreboard decoration Ratings Preload Composers Preload Awards Preload Home Preload Search Preload