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Red Planet
(2000)
Album Cover Art
Composed, Performed, and Co-Produced by:

Conducted by:
Nick Ingram

Orchestrated by:
Tim Simonec

Score Vocals by:
Emma Shapplin
Melissa Kaplan

Chorus Led by:
Jenny O'Grady

Co-Produced by:
Paul Haslinger
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Pangaea Records
(November 7th, 2000)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
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ALSO SEE




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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you appreciate unconventional, crossover, and postmodern film music, for Red Planet is a notably lovely merging of opera and electronica.

Avoid it... if you expect to hear some of the best music from the film on album (and vice versa, which is the truly curious aspect of this flawed production).
Review Icon
EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #557
WRITTEN 10/31/00, REVISED 9/28/08
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Revell
Revell
Red Planet: (Graeme Revell) The year 2000 saw two high profile movies about Mars, and debates ensued about which one was worse. Arguably, the earlier Mission to Mars loses the battle, though Red Planet has its fair share of problems. The directorial debut of Antony Hoffman proposed that a few decades into the future, Earth's environment would be poisoned and humans initiate an attempt to terraform Mars to give it an inhabitable atmosphere. A crew of six astronauts is sent to the planet to determine what has gone wrong with the remote process, and, after freak accidents and mutinous robots, among other problems, only a couple of them survive. The film's extremely poor character development, combined with ridiculously shallow dialogue and logical fallacies, sunk its chances at the box office, and it's no surprise that studios kept the topic of Mars at a distance for years. Both Graeme Revell and Ennio Morricone's scores for the two Mars films of 2000 were extremely unconventional. The Morricone work for Mission to Mars is an interesting study apart from the film, but is an absolute disaster in context. In fact, it remains one of the poorest matches with its visuals of any score in the Digital Age. Revell's work for Red Planet is much more difficult to evaluate, because so little of it is actually used in the final cut of the film. Like Morricone, Revell recorded his music in a concert-like format that doesn't always follow synchronization points in the narrative. But Revell wrote, performed, and produced extensive material that was not heard in the film, making Red Planet a bit perilous to examine in terms of its impact. Some of this material had carried over from his score for Strange Days. Complicating matters is the fact that the score fanned the flames of the debate about unconventional, crossover, and postmodern film music. The issue of postmodernism in film scores had come to the forefront in the 1990's thanks to Elliot Goldenthal and, more popularly, Don Davis' The Matrix in 1999. Revell's imaginative blend of opera and electronica is one of the most obvious, vibrant, and beautiful entries in that field of experimental sounds.



Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
818 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3.39 Stars
***** 217 5 Stars
**** 210 4 Stars
*** 179 3 Stars
** 104 2 Stars
* 108 1 Stars
  (View results for all titles)

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COMMENTS
18 TOTAL COMMENTS
Read All Start New Thread Search Comments
Here they are...
Pettengill - June 21, 2010, at 2:38 a.m.
1 comment  (1059 views)
Partially utterly goregoues
huntress - June 14, 2009, at 4:56 a.m.
1 comment  (1506 views)
Rescue Choir Track?
Chris - August 2, 2007, at 8:07 p.m.
1 comment  (1830 views)
Strange Days ---> Red Planet
Thom Jophery - July 15, 2007, at 10:38 p.m.
1 comment  (1988 views)
Looking for a song..
NASH - November 17, 2005, at 1:14 a.m.
1 comment  (2111 views)
Back Cover of the Soundtrack
Cybertron - April 5, 2005, at 1:03 a.m.
1 comment  (2122 views)
More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 56:26
• 1. The Tower That Ate People - performed by Peter Gabriel (4:05)
• 2. The Inferno - written by Graeme Revell/performed by Emma Shapplin (4:31)
• 3. A Thousand Years - performed by Sting (5:57)
• 4. Mars Red Planet - written by Graeme Revell (3:25)
• 5. The Fifth Heaven - written by Graeme Revell/performed by Emma Shapplin (4:53)
• 6. MontokPoint - performed by Strange Cargo (7:13)
• 7. Canto XXX - written by Graeme Revell/performed by Emma Shapplin (5:11)
• 8. Alone - written by Graeme Revell (2:13)
• 9. Dante's Eternal Flame - written by Graeme Revell/performed by Melissa Kaplan (3:40)
• 10. Crash Landing - written by Graeme Revell (5:13)
• 11. The Tower That Ate People (Remix) - performed by Peter Gabriel (6:27)
• 12. When the World is Running Down (You Can't Go Wrong) - performed by Different Gear Vs. The Police (3:35)

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes no extra information about the score or film, with only extensive credits and legal jargon.
Copyright © 2000-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from Red Planet are Copyright © 2000, Pangaea Records and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 10/31/00 and last updated 9/28/08.
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