SUPPORT FILMTRACKS! CLICK HERE FIRST:
Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk
iTunes (U.S.)
Amazon.ca
Amazon.fr
eBay (U.S.)
Amazon.de
Amazon.es
Half.com
Glisten Effect
Editorial Reviews
Scoreboard Forum
Viewer Ratings
Composers
Awards
   NEWEST MAJOR REVIEWS:
     1. Transformers: Last Knight
    2. Cars 3
   3. The Mummy
  4. Wonder Woman
 5. POTC: Dead Men Tell No Tales
6. Alien: Covenant


   CURRENT BEST-SELLING SCORES:
       1. Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
      2. Fantastic Beasts/Find Them
     3. Willow
    4. The Ghost and the Darkness
   5. An American Tail
  6. The Wind and the Lion
 7. Doctor Strange
8. 10 Cloverfield Lane
   CURRENT MOST POPULAR REVIEWS:
         1. Star Wars: Force Awakens
        2. E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
       3. Titanic
      4. Avatar
     5. Nineteen Eighty-Four
    6. Gladiator
   7. Star Wars: A New Hope
  8. Animal Farm
 9. LOTR: Fellowship of the Ring
10. Harry Potter: Sorcerer's Stone
Home Page
The Road to El Dorado
(2000)
Album Cover Art
American Commerial
Japanese Commerial
Album 2 Cover Art
Bootleg #1
Album 3 Cover Art
Bootleg #2
Album 4 Cover Art
Co-Composed and Co-Produced by:

Co-Composed by:
John Powell

Co-Conducted and Co-Produced by:
Gavin Greenaway

Co-Conducted by:
Rupert Gregson-Williams

Orchestrations Supervised by:
Bruce L. Fowler

Guitar Performances by:
Heitor Pereira
Labels Icon
LABELS & RELEASE DATES
Dreamworks Records (American)
(March 14th, 2000)

Polygram (Japan)
(March 23th, 2000)

Bootlegs
(2001)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
The commercial albums are regular releases in their respective nations. The bootlegs circulate regularly on the secondary market. The first bootleg number is 'HZCD-012LR' and the second bootleg number is 'RTCD-7443-02.' Other variants exist.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
Also See Icon
ALSO SEE




Decorative Nonsense
PRINTER FRIENDLY VIEW
(inverts site colors)




   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... on any of the commercial or bootleg albums only if you are a major fan of the film, because both have considerable flaws that cannot compensate for about five minutes of truly appealing score material.

Avoid it... on the commercial album if Elton John makes you sick, and avoid the bootlegs if five minutes of extra, relatively uninteresting score material isn't worth the trouble.
Review Icon
EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #674
WRITTEN 10/9/03, REVISED 3/22/09
Zimmer
Zimmer
Powell
Powell
The Road to El Dorado: (Elton John/Hans Zimmer/John Powell) As part of Dreamworks' continuing attempt to steal the heart of the animated movie genre away from Disney, the studio followed up their hit film The Prince of Egypt in 1998 with The Road to El Dorado two years later. Despite spirited vocal performances by Kenneth Branagh and Kevin Kline for their characters' adventures in the new world, The Road to El Dorado met the same doom that Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas would encounter a few years later. Audiences spoiled by spectacular leaps forward in animated film graphics and photography tended to shun animations unless they had either spectacular new visuals or, if that failed, fantastic songs. Indeed, The Road to El Dorado would suffer from a lack of advancement in animation technology, and perhaps knowing this fault ahead of time, the producers of the film decided to sculpt the project into a musical extravaganza. With composer Hans Zimmer and his Media Ventures organization established as a tested and successful score producing entity for this genre, the producers decided to team Zimmer once again with songwriter and performer Elton John (the collaboration that had won Oscar gold for The Lion King). With the arrival of John came the transformation of the project from a traditional animated musical (which had been the goal of The Prince of Egypt) into a pop-oriented one, as The Lion King and Tarzan had been. The film came at a good time for John, who decided to make the film his own personal album release of new songs. When considering the music for the film, he said publicly, "Instead of just having the usual five songs on a soundtrack album and the rest of it being score, let's make an album out of this and include songs we wrote that didn't make the movie." So out the window went the traditional animated musical structure. John would saturate the film and its soundtrack album with semi-relevant material, using it as a platform for his own promotion. As such, it foreshadowed the exact problem that would plague Brother Bear a few years later, with the re-teaming of Tarzan duo Phil Collins and composer Mark Mancina yielding an album that really functioned as only a Collins affair.



Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
387 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 2.95 Stars
***** 74 5 Stars
**** 69 4 Stars
*** 86 3 Stars
** 82 2 Stars
* 76 1 Stars
  (View results for all titles)

Comments Icon
COMMENTS
3 TOTAL COMMENTS
Read All Start New Thread Search Comments
Opinion on music & movie
LordoftheFuture - November 26, 2012, at 12:39 p.m.
1 comment  (515 views)
The trail we blaze bootleg #1
ben - April 21, 2009, at 4:32 p.m.
1 comment  (1390 views)
Weird review ...
Scara - October 28, 2004, at 1:05 p.m.
1 comment  (2292 views)
More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
American Commercial Album Tracks   ▼Total Time: 62:08
Songs by Elton John:
• 1. El Dorado (4:22)
• 2. Someday Out of the Blue (Theme from El Dorado) (4:47)
• 3. Without Question (4:47)
• 4. Friends Never Say Goodbye (4:20)
• 5. The Trail We Blaze (3:53)
• 6. 16th Century Man (3:39)
• 7. The Panic in Me (5:40)
• 8. It's Tough to Be a God - duet with Randy Newman (3:49)
• 9. Trust Me (4:45)
• 10. My Heart Dances (4:51)
• 11. Queen of Cities (3:56)

Score by Hans Zimmer:
• 12. Cheldorado - suite of "Cheldorado"/"We Are Safe" (4:26)
• 13. The Brig (2:58)

Score by John Powell:
• 14. Wonders of the New World - suite of "To Shibala"/"Save El Dorado"/"The Ball Game" (5:55)
Japanese Commercial Album Tracks   ▼Total Time: 65:57
Bootleg #1, HZCD-012LR Tracks   ▼Total Time: 37:02
Bootleg #2, RTCD-7443-02 Tracks   ▼Total Time: 60:12

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The commercial albums contain lyrics for the songs, but no extra information about the score or film. The original bootlegs had no internal packaging.
Copyright © 2003-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from The Road to El Dorado are Copyright © 2003, Dreamworks Records (American), Polygram (Japan), Bootlegs and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 10/9/03 and last updated 3/22/09.
Reviews Preload Scoreboard decoration Ratings Preload Composers Preload Awards Preload Home Preload Search Preload