SUPPORT FILMTRACKS! CLICK HERE FIRST:
Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk
iTunes (U.S.)
Amazon.ca
Amazon.fr
eBay (U.S.)
Amazon.de
Amazon.es
Half.com
Glisten Effect
Editorial Reviews
Scoreboard Forum
Viewer Ratings
Composers
Awards
   NEWEST MAJOR REVIEWS:
     1. Jurassic World
    2. Tomorrowland
   3. San Andreas
  4. Mad Max: Fury Road
 5. Avengers: Age of Ultron
6. Cinderella
   BEST OF JAMES HORNER (1953-2015):
         1. Star Trek II: Wrath of Khan
        2. Willow
       3. The Land Before Time
      4. Glory
     5. Legends of the Fall
    6. Apollo 13
   7. Titanic
  8. The Legend of Zorro
 9. Avatar
10. The Amazing Spider-Man
Home Page
Who Framed Roger Rabbit
(1988)
Album Cover Art
1988 Buena Vista
1988 Touchstone
Album 2 Cover Art
2002 Walt Disney
Album 3 Cover Art
Composed, Conducted, and Produced by:

Orchestrated by:
James Campbell

Performed by:
Labels Icon
LABELS & RELEASE DATES
Buena Vista Records
(1988)

Touchstone Records
(1988)

Walt Disney Records
(April 16, 2002)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
The 1988 Buena Vista Promo (CD 010) and 1988 Touchstone Records commercial album are both out of print, but their extensive original pressing made them relatively easy to find on the secondary market. The 2002 Walt Disney Records album was a regular U.S. release, but fell out of print as well.
Awards
AWARDS
Nominated for a Grammy Award.
Also See Icon
ALSO SEE




Decorative Nonsense
PRINTER FRIENDLY VIEW
(inverts site colors)



Availability | Awards | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you can't get enough of that old Warner Brothers, Looney Tunes style of frenetic, enthusiastic orchestral slapstick music.

Avoid it... if dizzy, swinging, and dynamic music for cartoons makes you want to strangle an animated character.
Review Icon
EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #495
WRITTEN 7/1/03, REVISED 3/18/09
Silvestri
Silvestri
Who Framed Roger Rabbit: (Alan Silvestri) Hailed as one of the most successful technological breakthroughs in the history of the animated film genre, Who Framed Roger Rabbit was an incredibly popular merging of animated and live-action filming technologies in 1988. And while the seamless integration of these two genres was heralded to no end at the time, the film strangely had little impact on the actual future of animation and live action films. It would take until 2003's Looney Tunes: Back in Action before the technique could be perfected in the digital realm. Ironically, the industry encountered even greater grosses in the interim by going back to the strictly animated scene, and Disney would hit the financial pot of gold beginning the next year with The Little Mermaid and continuing through all of the Alan Menken-composed projects of the 1990's. Despite the success of the visuals, Who Framed Roger Rabbit turned out to have a bigger legacy in the other realm in which it dabbled: cross-studio character mingling. It was also famous for its rare collaboration between Warner Brothers and Disney, and the licensing and copyright nightmare that the film ended up creating unfortunately made it a one-time experiment for quite some time. No better a director to pull off this competitive corporate challenge than Robert Zemeckis. Having proven with Back to the Future that he was a bankable director, Zemeckis tackled the project with charm and succeeded in making a film that was much better than the nightmarish corporate circumstances under which it was created. Zemeckis had discovered composer Alan Silvestri during the production of Romancing the Stone just a few years earlier, and their work together on Back to the Future created undeniable movie magic. The director naturally continued to trust Silvestri's talents, bringing the aural atmosphere of a fictional cartoon studio to life in Who Framed Roger Rabbit before concentrating solely on the Back to the Future sequels. Ultimately, Silvestri's task for Who Framed Roger Rabbit would be to do a little merging of his own, too. The old, frentic Looney Tunes style of writing had to be infused into the jazzy atmosphere of 1940's Los Angeles that still exuded a hint of noir personality.

Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
460 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3.66 Stars
***** 175 5 Stars
**** 101 4 Stars
*** 87 3 Stars
** 48 2 Stars
* 49 1 Stars
  (View results for all titles)

Comments Icon
COMMENTS
4 TOTAL COMMENTS
Read All Start New Thread Search Comments
Music from the Maroon Moviola   Expand >>
Mark Toonery - March 18, 2010, at 9:16 p.m.
2 comments  (1020 views)
Newest: December 7, 2011, at 11:28 a.m.by RiosJOHANNA34
Silvestri strikes again   Expand >>
David - August 21, 2003, at 4:20 p.m.
2 comments  (2861 views)
Newest: August 22, 2003, at 11:27 a.m.by Composer
More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
1988 Buena Vista Album Tracks   ▼Total Time: 39:15
• 1. The Setup (6:01)
• 2. Judge Doom (6:12)
• 3. The Will (9:17)
• 4. On the Lam (6:12)
• 5. Toontown (2:21)
• 6. The Last Laugh (9:12)
1988 Touchstone and 2002 Disney Albums Tracks   ▼Total Time: 46:02

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The inserts for all available albums include no extra information about the score or film.
Copyright © 2003-2015, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from Who Framed Roger Rabbit are Copyright © 1988, 2002, Buena Vista Records, Touchstone Records, Walt Disney Records and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 7/1/03 and last updated 3/18/09.
Reviews Preload Scoreboard decoration Ratings Preload Composers Preload Awards Preload Home Preload Search Preload