SUPPORT FILMTRACKS! CLICK HERE FIRST:
Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk
iTunes (U.S.)
Amazon.ca
Amazon.fr
eBay (U.S.)
Amazon.de
Amazon.es
Half.com
Glisten Effect
Editorial Reviews
Scoreboard Forum
Viewer Ratings
Composers
Awards
   NEWEST MAJOR REVIEWS:
     1. Transformers: Last Knight
    2. Cars 3
   3. The Mummy
  4. Wonder Woman
 5. POTC: Dead Men Tell No Tales
6. Alien: Covenant


   CURRENT BEST-SELLING SCORES:
       1. Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
      2. Fantastic Beasts/Find Them
     3. Willow
    4. The Ghost and the Darkness
   5. An American Tail
  6. The Wind and the Lion
 7. Doctor Strange
8. 10 Cloverfield Lane
   CURRENT MOST POPULAR REVIEWS:
         1. Star Wars: Force Awakens
        2. E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
       3. Titanic
      4. Avatar
     5. Nineteen Eighty-Four
    6. Gladiator
   7. Star Wars: A New Hope
  8. Animal Farm
 9. LOTR: Fellowship of the Ring
10. Harry Potter: Sorcerer's Stone
Home Page
Saw
(2004)
Album Cover Art
Composed and Performed by:
Charlie Clouser

Produced by:
Jonathan Scott Miller
Jonathan Pratt
Stu Songs

Additional Arrangements by:
Eric Gorfain
Robert Cross
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Koch Records
(October 5th, 2004)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
Awards
AWARDS
None.




Decorative Nonsense
PRINTER FRIENDLY VIEW
(inverts site colors)





   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... only if you appreciated the ridiculously brutal tone of the film and have a taste for extremely difficult, heavily metallic industrial scores.

Avoid it... if you understand the meaning of the word "empathy."
Review Icon
EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,762
WRITTEN 11/13/09
Shopping Icon
BUY IT


iTunes (-1)


Saw: (Charlie Clouser) It's always funny to watch and read the reactions of people who think films like the 2004 gore-fest Saw have some kind of artistic merit when you use such films as examples of why every successive generation of kids is growing up more aggressive and violent. If you denounce Saw as being not only repulsively violent but also a detriment to society, these people cry foul and claim that despite its plethora of fallacies of logic and a total lack of moral integrity, the film is still entertaining because of its unique concept and plot twists. Ironically, the only way their point is valid is if you accept the basic premise that the general movie-going population has indeed degenerated in its integrity. Make no mistake about it, Saw is a film that glorifies torture. It takes David Fincher and Seven as inspiration and hammers the concept into even more grotesque, NC-17 territory. The entire Saw franchise is built upon the fact that audiences like seeing other people tortured in ridiculous fashion. They liked it so much the first time that they rewarded novice director James Wan and his $1.2 million creation with over $100 million in worldwide grosses, spawning a franchise that included a sequel in each successive year for the rest of the decade. The first film, even if you set aside the gore and logical improbabilities (which is practically impossible), suffered from really wretched acting performances (Danny Glover was inexcusably bad and Cary Elwes was only tolerable because his career's evolution) and an obnoxious visual style that clearly indicated that the young director was trying far too hard to make an impression. Equaling the film's faux sense of intelligence was its soundtrack, which divides audiences along the same lines as the film itself. Essentially, if you thought that the film was a brilliant spectacle of horror, then the grinding, industrial score and similarly heavy songs will seem equal in both quality and emotional response. In reality, though, Wan's film received a score that functions primarily as unnerving sound effects, only developing any distant sense of compelling depth in the final few minutes. That was perhaps all that could have been expected of Nine Inch Nails keyboardist and producer Charlie Clouser, for whom Saw was a surprising launching pad into a career of trashy, low budget horror scores that included the aforementioned sequels to this mainstream feature debut (each increasingly difficult for his collectors or Saw enthusiasts to find on album).



Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
144 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 2.06 Stars
***** 10 5 Stars
**** 12 4 Stars
*** 20 3 Stars
** 38 2 Stars
* 64 1 Stars
  (View results for all titles)

Comments Icon
COMMENTS
2 TOTAL COMMENTS
Read All Start New Thread Search Comments
Charlie Clouser
Reptile - May 17, 2013, at 9:55 a.m.
1 comment  (549 views)
Nailed again
Richard Kleiner - November 25, 2009, at 6:47 p.m.
1 comment  (1203 views)
More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 57:20
• 1. Sturm - performed by Front Line Assembly (6:06)
• 2. Hello, Adam (3:57)
• 3. Bite the Hand That Bleeds - performed by Fear Factory (4:01)
• 4. Last I Heard (4:40)
• 5. Action - performed by Enemy (3:43)
• 6. Reverse Beartrap (4:47)
• 7. You Make Feel So Dead - performed by Pitbull Daycare (3:49)
• 8. X Marks the Spot (4:34)
• 9. Wonderful World - performed by Psycho Pomps (5:00)
• 10. Cigarette (3:07)
• 11. We're Out of Time (3:48)
• 12. Fuck This Shit (4:09)
• 13. Hello Zepp (3:00)
• 14. Zepp Overture (2:34)

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes a note from the director that praises this score with all the stereotypical descriptors given by an inexperienced filmmaker that doesn't know the difference between a good score and pure shit.
Copyright © 2009-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from Saw are Copyright © 2004, Koch Records and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 11/13/09 (and not updated significantly since).
Abysmal franchises like this one exist because of an intellectually bankrupt society that actually believed that George W. Bush was a good idea.
Reviews Preload Scoreboard decoration Ratings Preload Composers Preload Awards Preload Home Preload Search Preload