SUPPORT FILMTRACKS! CLICK HERE FIRST:
Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk
iTunes (U.S.)
Amazon.ca
Amazon.fr
eBay (U.S.)
Amazon.de
Amazon.es
Half.com
Glisten Effect
Editorial Reviews
Scoreboard Forum
Viewer Ratings
Composers
Awards
   NEWEST MAJOR REVIEWS:
     1. Transformers: Last Knight
    2. Cars 3
   3. The Mummy
  4. Wonder Woman
 5. POTC: Dead Men Tell No Tales
6. Alien: Covenant


   CURRENT BEST-SELLING SCORES:
       1. Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
      2. Fantastic Beasts/Find Them
     3. Willow
    4. The Ghost and the Darkness
   5. An American Tail
  6. The Wind and the Lion
 7. Doctor Strange
8. 10 Cloverfield Lane
   CURRENT MOST POPULAR REVIEWS:
         1. Star Wars: Force Awakens
        2. E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
       3. Titanic
      4. Avatar
     5. Nineteen Eighty-Four
    6. Gladiator
   7. Star Wars: A New Hope
  8. Animal Farm
 9. LOTR: Fellowship of the Ring
10. Harry Potter: Sorcerer's Stone
Home Page
Triumph of the Spirit
(1989)
Album Cover Art
Composed, Conducted, and Produced by:

Orchestrated by:
Mark McKenzie
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Varèse Sarabande
(December 10th, 1989)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
Also See Icon
ALSO SEE




Decorative Nonsense
PRINTER FRIENDLY VIEW
(inverts site colors)



   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you respect the melodramatic awe that a truly well researched and rendered Holocaust score can provide.

Avoid it... if poor depth of sound in recording quality tends to distract you during heavily layered orchestral scores.
Review Icon
EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,283
WRITTEN 6/19/01, REVISED 5/6/07
Shopping Icon
BUY IT


iTunes (9.99)


Eidelman
Eidelman
Triumph of the Spirit: (Cliff Eidelman) Among the lesser known dramas about the Holocaust, Triumph of the Spirit featured the story of a prisoner (Willem Dafoe) who survives the death camps by becoming a boxing champion over other prisoners at Auschwitz. Understandably gloomy in the trials of the main character, the film was ultimately an arthouse affair with a predictably bittersweet ending. After scoring a string of even more obscure releases, the newly arrived musician Cliff Eidelman was recommended for a composing position in the production of Triumph of the Spirit at a very young age, only a few years out of his music studies. Not many people are familiar with the scores of Cliff Eidelman from his pre-Star Trek days, but there is no doubt that Triumph of the Spirit is the strongest of the young composer's early works. When presented with the prospect of working on the true WWII/Auschwitz story, Eidelman jumped at the opportunity, noting that the film had lengthy sequences without dialogue, allowing the score to flourish in emotion for extended cues. As part of the process of creating a few demonstration pieces for the producers of the film, Eidelman manually researched the instrumentation and language of the Greek Jew culture that was depicted in the story, and this attention to ethnic detail won Eidelman the job. Because of those lengthy sequences without dialogue, Eidelman would utilize a large performing group and chorus to represent the emotional intangibles of the tale, traveling to Rome to record this score with the large group of performers and singers of the Unione Musicisti Di Roma. A common question regarding the choral renditions involves the unconventional use of language in the spoken chants; the language in which the chorus performs is actually a native Ladino, a cross between Hebrew and Spanish that Greek Jews in Spain and Eastern Europe spoke at the time. Eidelman also took note of the instrumentation from the same pre-WWII time and regions of Europe. Along with a primary role for strings (which carry much of the emotional weight of the score), a mixture of Eastern and Western instruments was used, including guitars, tamboras, mandolins, and mandolas. Accenting the stark visuals for the film, this precise choice of instrumentation provides one of the more authentic holocaust sounds in film score history.



Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
310 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3.37 Stars
***** 76 5 Stars
**** 87 4 Stars
*** 66 3 Stars
** 39 2 Stars
* 42 1 Stars
  (View results for all titles)

Comments Icon
COMMENTS
0 TOTAL COMMENTS
Read All Start New Thread Search Comments


No Comments

More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 53:27
• 1. Main Title (2:25)
• 2. Love in Wedlock (0:49)
• 3. Dark Tunnel to Auschwitz (1:53)
• 4. There Was a Time (1:45)
• 5. Answer Us (3:53)
• 6. Mi Dyo Mi (0:49)
• 7. Avram Refuses to Work (2:22)
• 8. Longing for Home (1:48)
• 9. A Hard Felt Rest (1:28)
• 10. Hell Realization (0:32)
• 11. Elena's False Dreams (2:00)
• 12. There Was a Memory (4:26)
• 13. Begging For Bread (1:04)
• 14. The Mourning (2:13)
• 15. The Slaughter (2:15)
• 16. It Was a Month Before We Left (1:29)
• 17. Hunger (1:20)
• 18. Mercy on to Us (1:27)
• 19. Salamo Desperately Finds Allegra (3:27)
• 20. Allegra's Punishment (1:36)
• 21. A New Assignment (1:44)
• 22. Death March (5:37)
• 23. Epilogue/End Credits (6:54)

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes no extra information about the score or film.
Copyright © 2001-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from Triumph of the Spirit are Copyright © 1989, Varèse Sarabande and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 6/19/01 and last updated 5/6/07.
Reviews Preload Scoreboard decoration Ratings Preload Composers Preload Awards Preload Home Preload Search Preload