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The Truman Show
(1998)
Album Cover Art
Co-Composed and Co-Produced by:
Burkhard Dallwitz

Co-Composed by:
Philip Glass

Co-Produced by:
Kurt Munkacsi
Peter Weir
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Milan Entertainment/BMG
(June 2nd, 1998)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
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ALSO SEE




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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if a collection of beautiful highlights from the original music by both Burkhart Dallwitz and Philip Glass for this film await your rearrangement into a highly compelling, if not simplistic new age style of listening experience.

Avoid it... if you rightfully expect the director's choices of the application of this music to the film to match the intellectual and thought-provoking nature of the plot itself, because The Truman Show remains one of the most excruciating missed opportunities for dual scores in recent cinema.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,633
WRITTEN 11/23/09
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Glass
Glass
The Truman Show: (Burkhart Dallwitz/Philip Glass) There's so much to love and loath about the 1998 drama The Truman Show by Peter Weir, and for those studying the impact of mass media on society, it opens countless doors to lengthy debate. Among its greatest assets is its incredible originality, a trait pushed heavily by Paramount at the time of the film's release amidst summer blockbusters of the normal action variety. It's a thinking man's film, postulating about the impact of the fictional, longest-running television show in history on its star. The catch is that the star doesn't realize that he is the subject of the show, filmed by thousands of hidden cameras and surrounded by actors for his entire life. His struggle to realize his identity and eventually escape from the massive town-sized bubble that serves as the studio set is the literal plotline, though issues of God relations and media manipulation are unfortunately left wanting in the production's unexpectedly short running time. Therein lie the catastrophic problems with The Truman Show. While the exploration of all the facets of the production is fascinating to both view and contemplate, the film is perhaps the most disturbing tale of abuse ever conceived. The plot seems to ignore the facts that the civil rights of Jim Carrey's title character are unequivocally violated and the cost of such a production at startup would never be acceptable to any studio. And what about this man's sex life? Can't a guy masturbate in the living room without a studio producer waiting for him to finish? These overwhelming fallacies of logic are devastating counterweights to the originality of the tale and some of the minimal humor conveyed in its early scenes (the "It Could Happen to You" poster of an airplane impaled by lightning in the travel agency office is nothing less than classic and should have been marketed as one of the film's alternate posters). Nevertheless, the film was an enormous success and finally allowed Carrey to leave his rubbery slapstick mannerisms aside. One of the most interesting conundrums created by Weir is the role of music in The Truman Show. It exists on two levels, one meant to address the broadcast of the show and thus aimed at its fictional viewers within the tale, and a second meant to actually score the overarching film itself.



Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
280 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3.25 Stars
***** 48 5 Stars
**** 73 4 Stars
*** 86 3 Stars
** 48 2 Stars
* 25 1 Stars
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Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 56:30
• 1. Trutalk* (contains dialogue) (1:18)
• 2. It's a Life* (1:30)
• 3. Aquaphobia* (0:40)
• 4. Dreaming of Fiji** (1:54)
• 5. Flashback* (1:19)
• 6. Anthem - Part 2 (from Powaqqatsi, written by Philip Glass) (3:50)
• 7. The Beginning (from Anima Mundi, written by Philip Glass) (4:06)
• 8. Romance - Larghetto (2nd Movement from Piano Concerto No. 1 in E Minor, Opus II, written by Frederic Chopin) (10:42)
• 9. Drive* (3:34)
• 10. Underground* (0:56)
• 11. Do Something!* (0:44)
• 12. Living Waters (from Anima Mundi written by Philip Glass) (3:48)
• 13. Reunion* (2:26)
• 14. Truman Sleeps** (1:51)
• 15. Truman Sets Sail* (1:55)
• 16. Underground/Storm* (3:37)
• 17. Raising the Sail** (2:13)
• 18. Father Kolbe's Preaching - written by Wojciech Kilar (2:26)
• 19. Opening (from Mishima, written by Philip Glass) (2:14)
• 20. A New Life* (not contained in film) (1:58)
• 21. Twentieth Century Boy - written by Marc Bolan and performed by The Big Six (3:07)
* original score by Buckhard Dallwitz
** original score by Philip Glass

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes a note from the director about the soundtrack and some biographical information about Dallwitz.
Copyright © 2009-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from The Truman Show are Copyright © 1998, Milan Entertainment/BMG and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 11/23/09 (and not updated significantly since).
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