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United 93
(2006)
Album Cover Art
Composed and Produced by:

Conducted by:
Gavin Greenaway

Orchestrated by:
John A. Coleman
John Ashton Thomas
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Varèse Sarabande
(June 6th, 2006)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
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ALSO SEE




Decorative Nonsense
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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... only if you can satisfy yourself with about five minutes of deeply engaging, full ensemble heroism with an effective, propulsive touch of dread.

Avoid it... if an otherwise mundane, ambient environment for basic gravity threatens to bore you as thoroughly as the plethora of similarly conservative scores for television documentaries and second-rate dramas.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,768
WRITTEN 10/20/10
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Powell
Powell
United 93: (John Powell) In the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, mainstream entertainment avoided the topic of airplanes, terrorism, and the attack itself for fear of repelling audiences. Five years seemed to be the right amount of time for serious cinematic explorations of 9/11 to begin to appear, and before too long there were action films with crashing planes and crazed terrorists sprouting up as before. Both Paul Greengrass' United 93 and Oliver Stone's World Trade Center opened the wounds of the events in 2006, the former taking a partially fictionalized look at the actions aboard the fourth and final plane to be hijacked that day. Like the previous television film Flight 93, a merging of documentary format and personalization gives United 93 as much credibility as possible. Nobody knows the exact events leading up to the nosedive of the flight into a Pennsylvania field that day, but Greengrass uses all the available known facts and fills in just enough necessary fiction to make a coherent and plausible narrative. Conspiracy theorists have long claimed that the plane was hijacked as part of an elaborate scheme by the American government, but the evidence in the case of this particular flight is too significant in quality and consistency to doubt anything that Greengrass recreates. The film performed extremely well with critics, eventually earning two Academy Award nominations (for direction and editing), and it doubled its $15 million budget domestically and tripled the investment elsewhere. There were no particularly big names associated with United 93, despite Greengrass' involvement with The Bourne Supremacy. Still, he choose to continue his collaboration with composer John Powell, who had officially arrived at the forefront of the composing industry with multiple major blockbusters just prior to United 93. The musical needs of the film were relatively minor; unlike Jerry Goldsmith and John Williams, Powell seemed to have no need to write an emotionally overflowing requiem for the event. Instead, United 93 required little more than the type of generic, minimally rendered ambience that you typically hear in cheap, second-rate television documentaries involving character struggles. And while it has been mentioned many times that United 93 was not meant to be a documentary, the score that Powell assembled for the production really does fall into the aforementioned category of mundane background noise.



Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
122 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 2.95 Stars
***** 17 5 Stars
**** 32 4 Stars
*** 27 3 Stars
** 21 2 Stars
* 25 1 Stars
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COMMENTS
1 TOTAL COMMENTS
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One of Powell's finest accomplishments
Erik Woods - December 19, 2010, at 9:42 p.m.
1 comment  (996 views)
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Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 43:22
• 1. Prayers (6:02)
• 2. Pull the Tapes (4:14)
• 3. Take Off (3:07)
• 4. 2nd Plane Crash (2:27)
• 5. Making the Bomb (3:57)
• 6. The Pilots (1:21)
• 7. The Pentagon (1:43)
• 8. Phone Calls (10:49)
• 9. The End (5:50)
• 10. Dedication (3:51)

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes a short note from the director about the film and score.
Copyright © 2010-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from United 93 are Copyright © 2006, Varèse Sarabande and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 10/20/10 (and not updated significantly since).
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