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Warlock: The Armageddon
(1993)
Album Cover Art
Composed, Co-Orchestrated, Conducted, and Produced by:

Performed by:
The Southwest Symphony Orchestra

Co-Orchestrated by:
Patrick Russ
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LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Intrada Records
(September 24th, 1993)
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ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you seek a somewhat campy but ultimately rewarding early horror score from Mark McKenzie, with two lovely melodies to sustain your interest.

Avoid it... if the underwhelming ensemble performances and abysmal recording quality in parts are too much of a detriment to an otherwise fine composition.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,027
WRITTEN 1/23/00, REVISED 1/20/08
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McKenzie
McKenzie
Warlock: The Armageddon: (Mark McKenzie) Sometimes the sequels to dumb and campy horror films take a stab at a serious follow-up to the obvious stupidity of the original. Luckily, director Anthony Hickox makes no such attempt with 1993's Warlock: The Armageddon, the sequel to 1989's Warlock. Actor Julian Sands returns for more hilarious overacting as a son of Satan, anxiously awaiting the opportunity to amuse himself at the expense of mortal humanity. His torment of innocent people is really the highlight of the film, but his acts are destined to be disrupted by the Druids who historically have contained his evil. In this case, two unsuspecting youngsters turn out to be the warriors meant to destroy the warlock, and along their adventures to save the world from doom, with magical transformations and ceremonious maturation, they fall in love. Violence, gore, sex, nudity, and profanity all grace Warlock: The Armageddon, but perhaps its greatest asset is its sense of humor regarding its own B-grade production characteristics. Whether you try to make your horror film campy or serious, a melodramatic score can't hurt, and young composer Mark McKenzie stirred up a frenzy of orchestral power for the occasion. Only the second feature film score of his career, Warlock: The Armageddon was the composer's second obscure horror project, which, at a time a decade later when he is typecast as a provider of fluffy Hallmark-style music, may seem odd. Already well known as an orchestrator, McKenzie was still testing the waters with his compositions and, needless to say, his talents were already clearly evident. His score for Warlock: The Armageddon exceeds anything you would expect from a second-time composer for a low rate horror film. Performed by an orchestra and choir of reasonable size, but suffering from occasionally questionable sound quality, it is McKenzie's melodic mastery that makes this score and album shine, ranking among the best of his career. Operating on an extremely tight budget, McKenzie had just a matter of days to assemble a makeshift studio for the recording and only a matter of hours in which to record it. Between copying mishaps, confusion amongst the players, and the warehouse that was ultimately transformed into a scoring page, the situation was a near disaster. Distracting stage sounds do plague the score's album.



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VIEWER RATINGS
200 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3.02 Stars
***** 40 5 Stars
**** 43 4 Stars
*** 40 3 Stars
** 36 2 Stars
* 41 1 Stars
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Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 40:59
• 1. The Battle Has Just Begun (4:57)
• 2. Swimming (2:09)
• 3. Birth of the Warlock (3:16)
• 4. Ken's Magic (3:13)
• 5. May I Help You Sir? (3:35)
• 6. Give Me the Stones (2:33)
• 7. Samantha and Ken's Love (2:10)
• 8. Party Crasher (2:25)
• 9. Samantha Becomes a Warrior (2:34)
• 10. Ken's New Life (4:09)
• 11. Warlock Gathers the Stones (2:16)
• 12. Armageddon Averted (3:21)
• 13. A Warlock Fantasia (4:03)

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes a note from the album's executive producer, Douglass Fake, from which following excerpt is taken:

    "After his first composing effort, Son of Darkness: To Die For 2, Mark turned to another horror film, this time scoring for a large orchestra and chorus. The score was recorded using three different sized orchestras, but because of a number of insurmountable problems the largest and most difficult music had to be recorded in a single 90 minute period, a very difficult challenge indeed. The resulting work is impressive, large scale, combining huge gothic sonorities for full orchestra laced with complex and aggressive outbursts from the orchestra for the horrific moments."


The text for the chorus, derived from the classic Requiem Mass, includes:

    Dies irae dies illa - The day of wrath, that day
    solvet saeclum in favilla - shall dissolve the world in ashes
    quantus tremor est futurus - what trembling shall there be
    Tremens factus sum ego - I am made to tremble and to fear
    et timeo dum discussio venerit - at the destruction that shall come.
    Calamitatis et miseriae - calamity and misery
    dies magna et amara valde - great and exceedingly bitter day

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The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from Warlock: The Armageddon are Copyright © 1993, Intrada Records and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 1/23/00 and last updated 1/20/08.
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