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We Were Soldiers
(2002)
Album Cover Art
Composed, Arranged, Conducted, and Co-Produced by:
Nick Glennie-Smith

Additional Music by:
Joseph Rizza Kilna

Orchestrated by:
Ashley Irwin

Co-Produced by:
Malcolm Luker
Randall Wallace
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Sony/Columbia/Legacy
(May 14th, 2002)
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ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release, but out of print as of 2008.
Awards
AWARDS
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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you value harmonious simplicity in circumstances that call for melodramatic and compelling heroism, for this music is lovely and effective despite its obvious sources of inspiration.

Avoid it... if the sum of all the perfect ingredients for a score doesn't always culminate in a satisfying recipe, especially for a picture that transcended formula production values in its other elements.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,650
WRITTEN 11/23/09
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Glennie-Smith
Glennie-Smith
We Were Soldiers: (Nick Glennie-Smith) To his credit, writer and director Randall Wallace absolved himself of his wretched screenplay for 2001's Pearl Harbor with We Were Soldiers the following year. Generally regarded as a very intelligently written story of the people and families affected by the initial battle between the North Vietnamese and Americans in the 1960's, the film represented only his second feature directorial project. It followed the pattern of extremely realistic battle violence made acceptable by Saving Private Ryan and Black Hawk Down, showing heroic deeds by average soldiers without dehumanizing the enemy. Thankfully, Wallace managed to convey the "people stories" of the primary characters without testing the limits of audience patience, ensuring those characters' actions in the height of battle an extra layer of meaning. Solid acting performances helped solidify generally positive reviews for We Were Soldiers, though despite worldwide grosses in excess of $100 million, the production didn't net as much as hoped (nor did it receive any serious award consideration). Wallace not surprisingly extended an offer once again to former Hans Zimmer associate Nick Glennie-Smith for scoring duties on We Were Soldiers; the two had collaborated on the writer's only other venture in the director's chair (The Man in the Iron Mask) and the leftovers of the general Media Ventures sound had come to define this genre at the time. The partnership, while limited to these two productions, inspired Glennie-Smith to some of his best achievements, We Were Soldiers remaining arguably the composer's most popular score of dramatic merit. His approach to handling the subject matter is largely predictable, using strains of Zimmer's music for The Thin Red Line and Black Hawk Down as clear guidance in places. But through a combination of two notable specialty performers and an extremely effective imitation of hymns traditional to the American military, Glennie-Smith managed to overcome the weaknesses of the majority of the work to produce one that delivers at the end. It is a score that requires a significant amount of patience, for the character-building sequences before the eventual battles do cause the ideas to take a fair amount of time to reach any truly satisfying dramatic statement. These cues, as well as those for conversational scenes in Vietnam, follow the Zimmer rule of conservatively melodramatic low string harmony, emulating The Thin Red Line at their most active moments of volume.



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VIEWER RATINGS
109 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3.2 Stars
***** 25 5 Stars
**** 26 4 Stars
*** 22 3 Stars
** 18 2 Stars
* 18 1 Stars
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We Were Soldiers
JoAnna - August 28, 2010, at 1:05 p.m.
1 comment  (931 views)
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Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 57:19
• 1. Prelude (0:56)
• 2. What is War (3:33)
• 3. Look Around You (8:45)
• 4. Flying High (2:51)
• 5. First Step (2:04)
• 6. NVA Base Camp (1:12)
• 7. Telegrams (1:21)
• 8. More Telegrams (0:55)
• 9. I'll Go With You (1:17)
• 10. Horrors (1:27)
• 11. Photo Montage (2:31)
• 12. That's a Nice Day (2:42)
• 13. Jack (0:33)
• 14. Jack's Death (1:38)
• 15. Final Battle (8:31)
• 16. Final Departure (10:30)
• 17. End Credits (6:33)

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NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes no extra information about the score or film.
Copyright © 2009-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from We Were Soldiers are Copyright © 2002, Sony/Columbia/Legacy and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 11/23/09 (and not updated significantly since).
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